102. Maggie Tincher | CrossFit Reston

102. Maggie Tincher | CrossFit Reston

In today episode Fern chat with Maggie Tincher. Maggie is a long-time member of Semair Staff, is a level 4 Coach, former firefighter and owns two Affiliates: CrossFit Fairfax and CrossFit Reston. Along with at, she’s been running an affiliate for 13 years plus, that incredible. This a just a shortlist of the Maggie’d accomplishments. She’s also been mentoring Fern. See even host need mentoring and help! – This is a great episode for anyone who wants to be a long-time coach and whats to have affiliate open for 13 years. Honestly, she really is the boss lady. Maggies is really that much of a badass.

Time Stamps:

(04:30) Opening a second affiliate

(13:47) In house coaching development

(18:10) Hiring the Coaches 

(21:54) 30min to 45min to an Hour 

(24:50) Class size 

(34:02) Running a business with your partner. 

Soical media: 

@Crossfitfairfax
@CrossFit Reston
@Magstinche

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Fern:
Hi, guys. Welcome back to the best hour of your day. Jason, again, be better hosts of the two of the Jason's here with my mentor, my current mentor, Maggie Tincher. Maggie's 0G and the Crossfit, World owns two affiliates, Crossfit, Rest in Crossfit,. Fairfax has coached all over the globe a former firefighter. And just all around.

Maggie Tincher:
Bad ass,.

Fern:
Bad ass, I was going to let you say it. I was gonna let you, as she likes, refer to herself as the lady boss. Definitely good at bossing people around. But where we out this weekend, this past weekend.

Maggie Tincher:
This is actually not nowhere. I was home, I had this next two weekends off, so.

Fern:
What are you going to do?

Maggie Tincher:
Well, last weekend was just Murph. This coming week. We have a girls retreat. Ladies retreat.

Fern:
So for you gym?

Maggie Tincher:
Yes. Yes, we have a nice farm, some big estate. One of our clients owns that and he's living, as you said. And we're just going to go there and we're just going to have some fun friday Saturday and Sunday.

Fern:
How many ladies will be attending this retreat?

Maggie Tincher:
It is about 14 of us. It's a lot. Yeah, it is. I'm in the and the property is beautiful.

Fern:
Is is is amazing how much wine is on order for that?

Maggie Tincher:
They say that I bought several bottles, but when I went there Friday to look at the property one more time, I mean they have wine they have. wine? I mean, you don't even have bottles, cases of wines and alcohol there, so.

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah. The pros of having wealthy clients.

Maggie Tincher:
Yes, it is. And clients that love to share.

Fern:
And this is no dudes, right. Just just the ladies right?

Maggie Tincher:
Just ladies, I think the dudes are actually going to be doing it next weekend is like a happy men day or something like that. They're going to go to a distillery again. One of our clients owns a distillery whiskey.

Fern:
Father's Day is coming up. So go out there. Buy some whiskey for your dad.

Maggie Tincher:
Go there and just enjoy some whiskey.

Fern:
That's really cool. Is that the first year? Is it the first time you've ever done it?

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. Is it the first year.

Fern:
That's cool. That's. Do you guys do a lot of community events like that, in your gym or just like the first kind of like off site? I guess I should.

Maggie Tincher:
Say the upside. Now, we tried to do that. A lot of that, especially the thw, the ladies we've done there. You know, wine tours, we go out into Boston and the bus come pick us up out of side of the gym we're gone for hours, come back and everybody gets home safely. We go happy hours, events in inside the gym.

Fern:
But this super side note, who's in charge of that? Are you in charge about it? You have somebody who's the head the lead for that?

Maggie Tincher:
Well, let's see. That say somebody runs it. But I like to give them my input, too. But then you know what we're doing.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah, I can see that. That's very much your style. You know, we like to let people do their thing. But yeah, tell them what to do. It's good. Yes. That's that. That's that Latin American female you all coming out. Yeah, right. I'm the boss. I won't let you think that you're in charge, but I'm the boss.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. This is this is your event. But I have the last word. Yes.

Fern:
OK. Cool So you own two gyms, right?

Maggie Tincher:
Correct. Crossfit Fair Fax and Crossfit Reston.

Fern:
Which always forget which one. Fairfax is the original, right?

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. Right. Well up in Fairfax in 2006 and then rested in 2010.

Fern:
So 13 years. I don't think we may have had somebody who's been open that long on the show, but there's not a whole lot of gyms. That had been open for 13 years was a long time. We're coming up on 10 this year for my four hour one facility. That's a long time. And then how long after that until you open Reston?

Maggie Tincher:
The Reston 2010,.

Fern:
OK.

Maggie Tincher:
It was four years after Weald had opened Fairfax.

Fern:
Dam. So you guys are coming up. Oh, you guys are almost at two facilities over 10 years.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah, yeah, we have next year actually. Yeah, next year is going to be used for Reston.

Fern:
That's crazy.

Maggie Tincher:
Yes. Man

Fern:
What's. So obviously, there's a little gap there. About a four year gap between opening those two. But I mean, I could speak to this, but I would much prefer you speak because you've been doing it longer. But what are some of the things that when you open the second one? What were some of the challenges that you guys went through that you didn't anticipate? I mean, obviously, everybody thinks it's like two gyms, double the money. That could be the case. But generally it is not.

Maggie Tincher:
It's not in from the first one, actually. First one and the second one or approach, it was completely different. Like the first one, we open Crossfit, friends. Actually, when we are Fillion, we do not have a facility. Right. But we are affiliated because we wanted to pretty much train firefighters. So Dallas, Dallas or or I get a we we doing these with firefighters managed as well. Just do this whole Crossfit, thing with them. And now we started inside. The a gym, it was fitness, 24 guys were really nice, but is like a you know, we don't know this Crossfit,. Let's just call it boot camp. Whatever? Or cross call it Crossfit, Boot camp. So we started there until we were kicked out like eight months later or something like that because up was an issue of the trainers that they felt that we were a threat because we were stealing the clients. Right. They wanted to do these Crossfit,. So when we started with Fairfax, he was like a think capital was like. I it was a $3000, that was it, but we were pretty lucky that when we were kicked, one of our clients, they had a warehouse, it was about three thousand a square foot and they were using only half of it to store computers. So they say, guys, you know, you guys can use the one of the warehouse as long as you train.

Maggie Tincher:
The family liked like a pretty good deal. So we've put up a T-shirt and they was fourteen hundred square foot. Just imagine just pretty small. Had one bathroom. And we were we had one class in the morning, a couple a class in the afternoon. Jeb would call the firefighters like the night before. You guys are going to work out next day because you know, when you some cleint we need some people I like we could. I but most people, they didn't pay. You know, the firefighters will just do that for free. It by bill will bring other people. So because we're still firefighters, right. We work different shifts. So when he was working, I was coaching. When I was coaching. When I was working. He was coaching. Yeah. Well we pretty much like that was or income fire apartment and everything that we'll make it was just to buy equipment. Right. You know, at the end of the month a year Brantly's let's buy one more raw and then we'll place barbells. Let's put another pool, a bar you know. And then after a year we, we had to move because we grow up that, you know, the space was really was crowded. So we we had enough money to find a place. And in from that place, that was about three thousand square square feet. And.

Fern:
I'd say for just for context, how big is Reston?

Maggie Tincher:
Reston is eight thousand square.

Fern:
Square. So from fourteen hundred to a thousand.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. I mean like when we fall in love with four flags we follow coach Glassman approach that he is like a Sizemore. Let your clients tell you when it's time to move in. Actually, that happened. Fairfax. You know, twice from there. Fourteen hundred to the three thousand. And from the three thousand to where Fairfax is now, it's almost 5000 square foot. I know. Lucky enough that all this locations being within like a mile of each other. So there is this that the neighborhood is being the same. Reston was a little bit different. We saw an opportunity. That was the west side of the county. There was no Crossfit, boxes on that side of the county. And we went a little nervous because they'll be like, we'll have to, you know, get some some cash to open that we got again, one of our clients and investors. I ain't I live and work in Reston. I can be your investor. Just open the gym. So we thought about it. And the hardest part about that is because we needed it. Now with two locations, we needed somebody to manage the new location. So I quit the fire department with the thought that if things getting work as planned, I could always go back within that first year. That was nine years ago.

Fern:
Did you have a year? Did they give you like a year window that you were that you could go back? And then after a year you couldn't go back or not?

Maggie Tincher:
They didn't give you officially a year. But, you know, you had the option to before that year. You can apply and go back to the find the time in the same ranks. Seem everything before you resigned. Got it. Yeah. You know, we took the risk, but a didn't have to. I mean, like it simply would weed out. When we got arrested, we budgeted on everything just to be sure that we bought enough equipment. I would even go crazy. I mean it's a thousand isquith food compared to why we were there, like three thousand. That second location for Fairfax. We could have go crazy and buy everything that we wanted. We need it. We just speak for a whole class is going to be like pretty small. And we'd be pretty much would follow the same approach when we buy more equipment and just keep going. And, you know, I think that's pretty pretty that's that's.

Fern:
That's interesting. You bring that up because yesterday we did a one episode on like what? Like how big your classes should be. And Akerman was saying that when he first started, he basically bought equipment for half. So whatever he thought. Class size, you're gonna be like. He bought half the equipment and he got a little creative, which, oddly enough, is exactly what orange theory does to minimize their footprint. As far spaces, I think that is built on like something between thirty five hundred or four thousand square feet. So that positive twenty five have, you know, 12 pieces of equipment.

Fern:
But I think that's one of the things you brought up. Two things. One is equipment and I think that's one of things people over spend on on the front end. Yeah. More often than not. But the other thing that you brought up, which I think is interesting is the investor piece. And. Looking back on it. So I've done this with one that we purchased and then you obviously did it there.

Fern:
I think a lot of people were they potentially make the mistake is kind again, this. It has worked out and there is. But I see it work out far less often when they're partners than just basically having somebody who has cash to loan you. And then they just want their seven to 10 percent over that five year period. And a lot of people want to go in with multiple owners and it generally doesn't work that way.

Fern:
Whereas if I'm an investor, I'm just going to pay interest on that loan over five years and then give it back to him. But what I want to do at the bank end.

Maggie Tincher:
Was basically he was just an a silent investor. I mean, we pay the loan within three years. I mean, what ages and everything like the AWP. We actually pay before we may, you know. And then because of when we signed the papers, he also became part of it was part of the book. Right. And then after that, he was trying to get rid of him for a while. And then eventually we were able to buy him out. And yeah, I think like it work because he was a solid investor. He just I also knew he was a pretty decent person. He wanted us to succeed. You know, he was in being he was not a pain in the ass. He gave it to me. He didn't want anything to do. And at the end of the year, I just hate seeing him get profit and loss. You know, that's paper distribution. And then he was happy.

Fern:
Yeah. And I think that's most people I learned just talked some guy out of buying into a box last weekend. But when you look at it from a number standpoint, it's just not going. Most gym are just not going to gross enough to pay to owners. So that just ends up being generally the investor just gets money back. Who's also an owner? But the person who is the operator is just broke because they're giving the sensually 50 percent or whatever that allocated percentage was away to the investor when they could have just given up five to seven percent, maybe 10 on the high end for three to five years and then gotten all that back. So.

Fern:
So from it's from looks, so I'm here's what from a logistical standpoint, what are the biggest challenges that you have in this kind of a two part question? Because this is something that I film challenging is so obviously you do a good job. First of all, you work level one, level two. How many how many seminars have you worked at this point?

Maggie Tincher:
You have no idea. I know I'm 200 or something, but I'm not I don't know exactly the number.

Fern:
Was it north that it's over two hundred. So it's it's a lot. It's probably close to 300. So a lot of coaching development underneath your belt. How do you guys go about coach development? So I know you have you know, Jeff was on some of our staff a little bit. You're on your Storen seminar stuff.

Fern:
For how long? Ten years.

Maggie Tincher:
May 2000, yet 2007. So that was also.

Fern:
More than twelve years. And then you have another one of your coaches who's now on seminar staff. But you guys are Reklau it all. Oh, is that. Who's the third one? Oh, yeah. Sara. That's right. Yeah.

Maggie Tincher:
Jeron. Alex.

Fern:
Oh, I forgot Jerson was coaching at RBOCs too.

Fern:
Yeah, that's a good pickup. You're gonna stole that one . Well, no, that's smart.

Maggie Tincher:
You know, my girl's got to be smart. You know, girl power.

Fern:
Be out there. The how do you do you guys have a system for coach development? So obviously that's a big deal if you have three red shirts underneath your roof. But but, you know, that speaks a lot to like the quality of coaching that's going on in the closet every day.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. So like before. I mean, he's been a priest actually with change over the past couple of years. And this years is different than previously. Where we tried to do what we tried to do was get both gyms together for a train to trainers. Right. We had like once a month every other month. But I mean, like he does the logistics, like trying to get 40 coaches.

Fern:
Yoy have 40 coaches?

Maggie Tincher:
Between the two gyms where I between coaches, teens, kids, interns. Right. So trying to get all that everybody together. Well, I ended up being only half a band that will show up because this Saturday. You know, and coordinating my escape and making sure that I don't work that weekend. And then the gym wasn't working at the fire department. So it was no, we wanted like trying to get everybody to get by. We wanted they connect you. Right. Basically, we won both both teams, Fairfax and Reston to be united. And we we'll do from things like will learn at the level one. So I did it would TEUs will share my progressions, will talk about how to teach this. We'll talk about lesson planning. We'll talk about a skill. You just name it every every time with some something different this year. Basically, what we've done is we just separated both gyms so that we is more manageable. Still, my general manager of Fairfax, Julie and Alex, they are the ones who are handling that. They train the trainers, the coaches development at Fairfax. And then Jeff and I do the coaches development restin.

Fern:
Okay. Yeah, I I think that's what we're going to end up doing because I don't know if you would agree or not, but I think Phrequency is far more important than like having this perfect setup and making sure that everybody's there. But Frequency is king, you know, because if you only do it once a month, because that's when everybody can get there. If somebody misses a month, that's like 60 days before they get their next piece of that.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah, I agree with you. So we've actually started doing leg and zoom call a you know, I understand. So most of the coaches, they do this is our time, right? So they'll be like, we'll keep you in the mornings and then all Bill just be at home in the evenings, kids, whatever obligations. So we'll try to do a 8:00, 8:30, we're going to do a zoo meeting and then that's what we do it. And a lot of also hands on like inside the gym. I happened to be coaching with somebody. They will get like that coach development right there. So, yes, helping me along with that, too, like especially with our new coaches. She's like mentor, a couple of them. So that is pretty helpful when you have another Risher that helps you with your stuff.

Fern:
What is your protocol for bringing on a new coach? Well, what does it look like for you guys?

Maggie Tincher:
So for I will say I'm a ninety nine percent of all coaches they've come with from within the gym. They have been clients first. That's the main thing, because we wanted to be part of the community before they wanted to be a coach. And it has happened like all of them be like dad. They have clients. And then they're just so in love with Crossfit,. They spent hours at the gym. So May as well just coach. So they approach us a you know, I want to be a coach. You want to be an intern. And they we have a new process where make sure that our interns become c coaches. Just so they leave a spot that is open for a long term and then the internship program depends on their level of commitment. How many hours they they can work a month. You know, you could take them anything between six months to up to a year to finish their internship.

Maggie Tincher:
So there's no set time on that. It's just when you when you when they've hit the criteria, they're on the team.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. They just while they evaluate it, you know, like they have like within the first couple of months, they have to submit like a written test. And then after like three, four, I can remember that they put this in paper. They have we have to do on a practical test. And then through the first six months, they are actually evaluated by different coaches and they would be ready, would do a less practical. And before they are giving the blessing, then it will be three different evaluations with three different coaches.

Fern:
Who gives the blessing? Is that you or Jeff?

Maggie Tincher:
What do you think?

Fern:
I love Jeff, you know. So what's funny what's funny about both of you guys is I was scared to death of both of you for a long time. And the longer I get to know you, the more the more I think you guys are just the nicest people ever.

Maggie Tincher:
But Jeff's got, like, you know, it just like he's got that intensity face, you know, like,.

Fern:
You know, his intensity faces, like I'm going to punch or I'm going to punch your head off your shoulders, face that thing. You know, like it doesn't really matter whether he's happy or upset. He's his Face it,.

Fern:
For one year, I think it was like it was either 2011 or 2012. I was having some issues getting to regionals to compete. And I like showed up late and Jeff was on the floor doing something. And I was like trying to get his attention as a Jeff Jeff. And also he'd just like turn. And he was just like, what? And I was like, never mind. I'll find something else to do. You just look so angry. And I was like, OK. I'm not I'm never gonna be friends with Jeff.

Maggie Tincher:
You know what? He just he doesn't do that well on their stress, like when he was doing the sectionals, the regionals. Those those two years were pretty rough on him.

Fern:
I mean, he's I that's a that's a long, stressful week. And I don't I don't I don't admire anybody that does that stuff. So I don't know. I don't know. I do admire. I don't. I don't. I don't. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Maggie Tincher:
And anybody who was smart enough that, you know, the second year, he's like, you know, what I think Chris made is going to do an awesome job. I think you should ask himYeah.

Fern:
This guy's really good, you guys. It's good, man. Yeah. You guys, that is that is kind of up Chris's alley though. Like that's he's good at that stuff. Yeah. So that's good.

Fern:
So actually, this will actually leads me to another question, because obviously the beauty of Crossfit, is everybody does things a little bit differently, which I think is which is really good because you can just constantly learn what you guys don't run. Typical Crossfit, classes reston, right? Like you guys run forty five minute classes.

Maggie Tincher:
you know what we actually about two months ago we switch to an hour class. I mean we've been doing 40. So this is when we started thefacts. We start with 30 minute classes,.

Fern:
30 minutes.okay.

Maggie Tincher:
30 minutes. Sounds like you know what it is. People love it. And then when we actually switch to forty five minutes, right is like, you know what? We just gonna. We'll get we'll we'll do that during the 30 minutes. We'll write the work out on the whiteboard. So people that were supposed to come before the class to warm up, you know, that were the warmup was written, but that didn't happen.

Fern:
You know, I think that's pretty standard back in the day, though.

Maggie Tincher:
I would like, you know, guys, this this guys is showing up. They don't camp by the warm up. They just went through them. So I told you, we just got to change it. And you know, people that I know we like 30 minutes well in meetings because you know how traffic is in this area. I mean, like, if you tried to get to a class and you get stuck in traffic and then you don't want to wait another hour or so, that 30 minutes for it, a lot of people work. Forty five minutes. They were complaining, but they again, they make it work. And then we talk about a we need to go to that two day, one hour classes. And it was my march I gave, you know, people how we love the forty five minute classes. We switch to the one hour classes. And I'm telling you, the clients. No complaints. Feel them. Yeah. You know, I think they're schedule, but coaches are the ones that I'm more grateful. For.

Fern:
The already know the answer, but elaborate on the why coaches are more grateful?

Maggie Tincher:
Extra fifteen minutes, you know, because the forty five minute classes made you look, you just go. You are just you're running you. You don't have time to mess around. Okay, guys, we've got to go. This is your warmup, right? Let's get you guys started. We're going to try to do a class in those forty five minutes. It was hard, but the thing why work for us for so many years is because we've always had two coaches on foot on the floor. So the classes ended in four or five minutes. The class probably about fifty five minutes by the second coach will get the first. We'll get the next class started. Right. befit them white broad and warm them up . Why the other coach was finishing with the previous class in this space. Allow us to do that too, because Preston is no bigger.

Fern:
But so far most of you guys you I haven't been in Maggie's gym, but of the eight thousand square feet. I mean, seventy five hundred of it is open floor space on it. It's a lot of big.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. But now what we're doing, we're doing the same thing at both gyms in Fairfax is only 5000 square feet. Right. In this Ba'asyir Fairfax grown. Oh, my gosh. A lot. I mean, like right now, even though is like a square foot where bigger Fairfax classes are bigger.

Fern:
What's it like? So that's it, that brings up a good point. How big is an average class for you guys? Like I've I've been in your gym sometimes when I'm like, can't really figure out what's going on. Like people are just swinging from the rafters and everybody's doing all sorts of stuff like what is going on.

Maggie Tincher:
I think, you know, it depends on the time of day, like a light or biggest class in the morning, like the first class, both gyms will be like 20, 20 plus people. By twenty, twenty, twenty five.

Fern:
So that's a big class and you have to go to it on the floor for that.

Maggie Tincher:
You always have two coach in the fall. And then when we get interns, that's when we throw the inter to just to help them. You know, sometimes there's even three coaches. When we have whenever we have free classes, make sure that we have an additional coach to take the person that is trying to class. You know, just take them through the hand, you know, guide them. But yes, so we will follow you.

Fern:
But I want to ask you a question because just so everybody's clear on that, so what you had for them, more so for the coach was a lot of forty five minute class with a little bit of overlap between those two. But the reality is like the the the amount of time people were there under supervision was probably still an hour.

Fern:
It was the same. Yes. Was it the same? Was it the same for your 30 minute classes?

Maggie Tincher:
Oh, no. The 30 I mean, the 30 minute class. That was back in 2000. That was eight thousand seven, six, seven and eight.

Fern:
And there was a 30 minute block. Just basically the workout.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. Yeah. It was just the was. Yeah. And you know, I mean like looking back to the way that we used to Coach back in 2006, 2007, innocent passengers shake my head and I went.

Fern:
So bad. Not bad.

Maggie Tincher:
Thank god. We didn't kill anybody because you know, so a lot of intensity. Right. And now I'm coaching. But I mean, we've come ways from. From that type of coaching. Actually, right now what we do is basically coaching and. Yeah. So for all coaches, it was more time for them to know. So we didn't want them to feel rush when they were coaching in a. It is OK. If somebody wants to go to the bathroom, you don't want to tell them. And they have to hold it, right.

Fern:
Yes.

Maggie Tincher:
And you know what? You also need to take a break to go to the bathroom before the next class. It is OK. So the coaches, it was even do the clients are still it's been in an hour. I think for them it was given that extra fifteen minutes to stay with the class for the whole hour. And then we think we haven't.

Fern:
We've been toying around with with making the class like not necessary. The class would be 60 minutes but basically seventy five minute blocks. So the coach can take a break because if you're going to coach three classes back to back there. That third one is just not that great usually.

Maggie Tincher:
And maybe I mean, let's say it works for us. And he's been working for us because we always have two coaches. So let's say I am I'm the head coach of the first class and you're my helper. You're my assistant coach. So, you know, when I take my class, I'm closing down or whatever we do at the end of the class and you get ready for your class, you go to the bathroom, you ready? So you take the next class, you're going to be hitting that class. Well, I go to the bathroom and then when I'm done, come back and just give your hand. I think you should be done with your warm up and then I help you during a specific warm up and doing the workout.

Fern:
So they do they swap roles.

Maggie Tincher:
Yes.

Fern:
OK. Got it. OK. That makes sense because you don't you know, you're not less engaged, but you're required for a little less energy on your part.

Maggie Tincher:
Yes, all day. One of them leads while the other one assists and the next class. They just reverse the roles. And for us, it's pretty good, too, because, you know, we need one class, the next class they'll leave in we can give them feedback. Otherwise they're always your assistant coaches, you know, and when you're not allowing them to grow. Right. So I hate it and I make mistakes. That's fine. That's what we are there to help them. Right.

Fern:
So that actually brings up a good point from a coach development standpoint. I know a lot of people. Approach this differently. But. When your coaches are when you're doing coach development, do you have kind of this line in the sand where you intervene or you just kind of let them flail and then give the feedback afterwards?

Maggie Tincher:
Well. We only need to be you being as I say, you know, like. As long as they're confident when they teach the class. Right. That it's OK. Clients, sometimes they don't even notice those things. Right. But if it is something that is, you know, safety, they will try to do it. If anything, something that is just less noticeable. A guys. Another thing that we want you to take into consideration as well, you know, just just like a little nugget of wisdom while the coaches coaching. Right. So know nothing that we don't want them to feel like a they screwing things up. No. And not after the class. That will be the feedback. Yeah.

Fern:
Yeah. I think we do it very similar. And I'm basically safety is that line in the sand. And because we've had problems in the past where either sometimes this is a long time ago, this got squashed. But we're a coach who might be either an athlete or sitting off to the side.

Fern:
We'll kind of interject. Oh, OK. You know, I want to add something. Like, no, no. Shut your face off to the side. Your time is not to talk. And I don't think people realize how detrimental that can be to a new coach, because you're basically just cut their knees out from underneath them and took away all of their professional reputation. So I think it's important for people to realize that when you're doing coach development, like you kind of don't have an option. Other than to let people mess up, you know, like there's times you're gonna have to step in, have to figure out how to do that tactfully, but you have to let them fall on their face a little. But you have to let them say things that are incorrect. You have to let them blow the timeline and you are going to be the one who's got to fix that. And that's just the way it goes.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. And you know what? Clients also understand that they know when there is a coach that is in training. They understand that. And, you know, we get a pretty good feedback and a response from our clients seem pretty, really overwhelming. They like men. We really like. Like such as such. You know, it's comfortable. We know how much they have improved develop and from where they started to where they are right now, because we also like their opinion. We do like informal surveys to our clients say, how is this person doing? You how is the coaching? What do you mean?

Fern:
I think that's important because sometimes this will that interaction will hurt my feelings from a standpoint of I think. When you spend your whole life trying to be a technical expert and trying to be a virtuoso of some sort. Sometimes you forget that one of the most enduring qualities is just people are fun.

Maggie Tincher:
Yes.

Maggie Tincher:
So I've watched and evaluated some classes that were just from a technical standpoint or just an abomination. They were just the worst possible thing that you could ever see. But the person did it with a ton of enthusiasm. And the members afterwards are just like, that was great. I love Joe. He's amazing. And I'm like, oh, my God. Like, what? What is going on? But I think it's important for us to get that kind of litmus test on there to realize that it's not all about being perfect. From a technical standpoint, like having people be the best out there, day does mean it needs to be fun.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah, I think I think that's a we I agree with you. The main thing is, one, you clients have to enjoy the classes. You know, they would. Be waiting hours to get to the gym. Right. That's going to be their time. They've been waiting for. So, yeah. They have to have a great time. And for all coaches is like anything we are. And then they know you guys are going to get better. The more you coach. You remember when you quote when you start coaching. I remember when I started coaching. Uses a lot of talking. Right. Sometimes a little teaching. Little cheerleading, too. So I think our job is after so many years I've been doing this, is guide them and help them to be like us, you know, because I know it's whenever a client tells me that, they ask me, a, why haven't you been here? We miss you. You know, we want you to be around. I'm like a you know, I'm coaching in the mornings here, mornings, I'm evenings or vice versa. All right. I want them to feel like even though I'm not there, they're still going to have the same quality of coaching with any of my coaches. That's the only way that we will be able to do that is by helping our coaches grow and develop like a mini versions of ourselves.

Fern:
I want to be a mini version of Maggie i want to be you Speaking of that, what what is some of the biggest? So we kind of deal with this jess and I, but like you and Jeff, obviously are both running facilities. Like what are some of the biggest challenges that you guys have had from a couple of steps? For anybody that's never run a business with their significant other, it kind of goes one or two ways. There's no middle ground there. It's kind of great or it is the thing that you will lock horns on every single day.

Maggie Tincher:
Well, yeah, it is. Been. Yeah, yeah. He's got these. He's pros and cons, right. One is that you you're with your husband. Know you better have all day. You've got lots of things to talk about. And sometimes you just don't even want to talk about anymore about those things. Right. I think for us is more like the. Sometimes you just pick the bottles. Agree to disagree. Like who? You know, he's like, yes, OK. But I want to I want to run in my way. He wants to run his way. You're running away when you're coaching and want to run in my way when I'm coaching in a thing like pretty much if you would help us a lot is giving each other job titles and description of what is your job? So that way eight. Don't worry about that. That's not your job. You know, you're doing this. You're programming your triumph. Even to a maintenance, whatever is right. I'm doing the books. I'm doing the finances. And, you know, it's just so that as we know and we have odd jobs, but that doesn't mean that we don't talk and ask each other advice or something. But I think that having our job description that help a lot. Otherwise, we're just like you would just the owners, but like we do everything.

Fern:
Yeah, that's that. And that's not just for working with the spouses. However, that does help. And again, just still works full time. So she's not as involved in the gym now, but I have found that to be very. Beneficial with the coaching staff because people love to to kind of step on other people's toes, whether it's about programming or about social media or about scheduling. And I think one of the most beneficial things you can do is protect the teams, swim lanes. Like sometimes a leader like that, your job is when somebody chimes in. You do exactly that. Relocated. That's not your job. You worry about you.

Fern:
I'll help him or her get this sorted out. But that's not your job. So don't worry about it. You know, because reality is, you know, myself included. Most of the people on your staff are not doing their job so well that they should have time to worry about other people like you. So that's the hard thing that you have to do. But when I see the team kind of breakdown, it's always because people are just like somebody makes a mistake. And then the other person's like, oh, I think I can do it better. And I'm like, probably not. So just mind your own business, you know?

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. And nothing like you said. The job, the title description help, especially with with thefacts, because, you know, like I haven't gone to Fairfax in God knows how long. Sometimes I just go just for the whatever happens. They have at coaching, I believe last year a club for gym twice for a couple of classes when he couldn't make it. And then we have a duty who basically she manages the gym. There she is. She is the face of facts. And Jeff has been trying to school. It's spend more time addressing the commute, has been killing him. So he just you know, I'm just going to start slowly switching back the rest. And I know he's very much now resting all the time in, but before, like he was too, even for the glitches was hard, like with that management. Right. Like they won something. They will escape the manager and they will go to Jeff. And it was like, well, and then, you know, Jeff's sweetheart is like, you know, like when you have mom and dad and you know that Mammy's going to say no. And then you just go around and they just go to the ad and dad is going to say, yes. That was basically what was going on. Right. So it was that was a lot of conflict, just like the guys. You know, it's like anything, you know, doing just you have a manager here. That's the person that you guys need to go to. That is like in a big you know, I think we got better at, like, anything. Communication for us. And I think when everybody said I look, yeah, this is this is the team and this is how it works. It's gotten much better.

Fern:
How do you go how did you go about choosing that that gym manager like how to watch some of the things you look for in somebody who's going to basically take over and represent your brand? Because, like, that's something. I mean, I fully admit I struggle with that.

Maggie Tincher:
And I think it's been because. The person that is managing first has been around me for I don't even know how many years. Fifteen years, almost 20 years. Trea. You know, we knew each other. I got her to do Crossfit,. She did. Crossfit,. We tried and she tried to go to the fire department when I was there. But then she got the kids. Then she joined the fire department later and it was just like, we're just pretty much doing the same things. I married Jeff and then She married one or just this friend. So it was like but she's been around the gym since we started. So she's seen it. And because she's been so like family, she's seen the struggles and. She sees the gym as it's like camp baby, too. And as basically you have to have somebody that is invested in the gym and they want to make the Games Six succeed. And he does. Does it? You know, like you don't want somebody that I'd be in a baby. Like, you know what? You know, I can go to work because I'm sick or this is it. I'm just an employee. You want them to see the gym as if this isn't. It's me, too. Right. Then he really cares about the gym.

Fern:
Have you have. Are there certain ways that you guys are felt? So obviously you have a relationship there and there's trust, but maybe not everybody has that. So I know a lot of people really struggle with kind of handing that trust over to that person and and kind of giving them the reins because, you know, because they can do it better and all that stuff. But when you. So I guess there's a couple different ways you can look at this like people can either be emotionally or financially invested in something or both like what have you guys found to be? I mean, obviously, I'm assuming you guys pay her a gym manager wage. Yeah.

Maggie Tincher:
Yeah. So it's like we started we just you know, she was just a coach from a coach. She moved to help managing the gym because Jeb was still there. And I will go there. Once we open for Reston, I was must have a ton of the other gym. And, you know, we started I started with a need somebody just help with the admin part, as you know, like you have to start somewhere and understanding what is going on behind behind the doors. And she liked did it. But I feel like regardless of who you choose, you know, it's gonna be somebody that you trust, like, you know, like you, baby. Is right. He has to be somebody that has been around. And that one knows the business, knows you, is part of the community and they care. I feel like the caring part, that's the most important thing, because you care, you are going to do whatever he needs to be done to. Make the business succeed. I don't seem to see it. You needed money, right? Yes. I'm going to tell you still need to keep the money at the end of the day. You need that, too. You know, your bills that if you take care of the people, people are going to stay. Giving and bringing other people. And just basically that, you know, and/or just the cycle. You got to trust Squibb and whoever is going to be in charge of the business is that person.

Fern:
Yeah. For me personally, over the years, it's been it's like when people ask me, though, like when it's somebody like you, when you're the sole person, you start having to give things up. Right. So obviously the service on the floor generally for for a couple of years, you're you're probably the best coach. So that's probably not what you should give up at that point. What I started giving up was all the admin roles that I hated. And I and my general litmus test for giving one of those up is if I messed it up two months in a row. So I messed it up two months in a row. It was time for me to give that up to somebody else. And you pay people for those tasks. And oddly enough, most of those tasks don't require a ton of time, which means from a from an overhead standpoint, it's not going to cost you a lot of money. But it is going to free up a lot of your time. And like so, for instance, I don't do anything with regard to the scheduling or programming. I probably have my hands the most in social media. But that's not even from. Like, I don't even do social media. I just kind of guide social media. And then. But like. The woman who does our scheduling, like she loves spreadsheets. Like she looks she's like spreadsheets make me happy and I'm like, then, you're in charge of scheduling like so and the scheduling gets done and it gets done on time every single month and everybody gets their schedules sorted out. So there are people that like love the things that you hate and then you can develop people to do the things that you love. But that's what I found, is the admin things are generally the easiest to hand off by mistake that I see people make as they don't pay people for that. Just pay. Here's the hourly rate. Here's what I expected to be done here is about how many hours it takes. Like are you? Is that good for you?

Maggie Tincher:
And they'll be like, yeah, I agree with that. Like, you know, you need to pay instead of just giving a free membership or like, you know, create trade services. When I think one of the first thing like we we were just growing and we needed more hours in the day and we just couldn't get any more than 24 hours. One of the first things that we stopped doing was the first one was in the gym. We need to get somebody over here to clean the gym because we will be like if between the morning classes we just get to the democracies and mopping the floor. Right. Do they need it? I mean, we could be doing something more productive with this time instead of spending an hour or just cleaning the gym. Right. Then the next thing is like, you know what? It just bookkeeping. Even though I love numbers, I love bookkeeping. I was like, I just need somebody. And then like, we'll keep her. My accountant been like, oh, my God bless you. Yes. Now they're doing numbers and like you said, lonely. So giving up, you know, things you don't. They do require some training because, you know, you're going to spend more time training that is going to feed you up some time like a nap. You've done it and I've done it. You know, it is the first time it takes a long time. But a. At dawn, the manuals for everything. I had to clients had to add membership's, had to do even for the coaches, had to do things in the Keogh's you had to use or member side, you know. So yeah, it takes some time at the beginning, but then it's easier just to a you know, notice a new person for whatever reason you have to switch assistant A.

Maggie Tincher:
He said he said that the file is just go ahead and go read him and and play with the system. Let me know if you have any questions.

Fern:
I started to do and I started doing video tutorials. So I would do videos like this. I would just screenshot whatever task I was doing because I was doing everything. And while I was doing an actual task that needed to be done, I would just talk through it, screen record it, put it on a shared file and then created modules so people can watch like what FFI or, you know, social media or whatever and created all those so people can literally watch them. And what that did was in time submitted a question. I'm like, go watch the video. Don't ask me the question because you were supposed to watch that already so that we can kind of stiff arm people and force them to learn it.

Maggie Tincher:
And that's pretty good. I like the video idea. I went old-fashion with PD and fire with Sly.

Fern:
Did that first, but it takes way longer. It actually doubles the time because if you do a video version of it, like I'm actually getting work done, I'm just capturing it while you. And so I found it to be way more beneficial, not just to me but to the team as well. So I can walk them through. I can walk through weird scenarios. I'm like the buttons up. You're on the right. Here's how it works. And of the screen is gonna come up kind of funny. So here's where you look in order to make that happen. But you got to do that. You got to do that leg work because then you can start handing those tasks off.

Maggie Tincher:
And as your team grows and if you have 40 coaches like you do, you can't train everybody like that's impossible. That's up. That's up. That is such a ginormous pain in the ass. Watch the module. If you have questions about the module, then do it. And I had a really good friend that was that was a mentor of mine for a long time who owns multiple Chick-Fil-A restaurants. He told me this one time and he said, hey, when you train people, they're gonna mess it up at least five times. So just wrap your brain around that and it's OK. By the fifth time, they'll probably do it better than you do. So just let them mess it up five times.

Maggie Tincher:
Yes.

Fern:
Now, that's cool. I have no idea of any coach. That's a lot of coaches.

Maggie Tincher:
It is. It is. It's just because of the two coaches per class. I mean, we started that and we just kept that. We doing that for you? I don't even know how many years.

Fern:
So this does bring up a question, but I know people have the question of whether they're listening to this. Are your coaches all those people are paid, correct? Yes. And then do they pay a membership or. No, they don't.

Maggie Tincher:
The benefits they get a free membership.

Fern:
I don't think they should. But I know people a lot of people do that differently where they have to work a couple of classes. I don't I don't necessarily agree with that, but everybody does it differently. So, yeah, because I know people have that question and I listen to that. So 40 paid coaches, but I'm sure I'm assuming they're all on different pay rates, too, right?

Maggie Tincher:
Yes. So even with our injuries, we use to be full, we induced to do the exchange of, you know, you get a free membership and then you do you and do shit. But then we actually you know, we need to do this the right way. So we switch. Everybody intends to pay interns and they get the they we follow scale. Right. Depending on your level of experience, whether you're an intern, whether you at a Level 1 Crossfit, coach, whether you are level or to a level 3 or 4. So you're going to follow one of those categories. So basically to move from one to the other that you need so many hours that you need to coach and give you complete. So I think that motivates all coaches also to those who are just the ones who take the level to those were a little too. They're working on the level three. Otherwise they get stuck right there until they get to the level 20.

Fern:
That's cool. And then word on the street is maybe level for this year, but I don't know. We've been hearing that for a while.

Maggie Tincher:
So your guess is as good as it means.

Fern:
I know. Cool. So for the big takeaway. So I got three things on here. So again, taking taking some advice from Maggie Ginger, who's 13 years and one box has two gems coming up on 10 plus years. The first one is Frequency, whether that be coach development or training, just admin stuff like Frequency is king. So you have to do that on a more frequent basis. The second one is communicate, communicate with the coaching staff, communicate with your spouse, communicate with your partners, with your investors. Like over communication is always probably the best communication in my mind.

Fern:
And then the last one is invest in your people, you know, financially, emotionally and anything.

And that's how you build a great culture. Because I don't I don't think you can have 40 staff members if you don't invest in people. I think people would just be jumping ship left and right.

Right. You know, they're part of the team.

The other part of your family, and you have to treat them like you've got to bring them into the fold. And basically you've got to protect them even when they mess up. That's part of your job as a as a as the owners to eat shit sandwiches sometimes that other people make.

Yeah, you have to have your backs.

Well, I was going to talk about South America, but I feel like it's a pretty good place to just stop right there. We can talk about that stuff. Yeah, it could be ours. Did another time. Real quick. So Akerman likes to ask this question, but he asks like what books you're reading? I'm more curious. Are there any series or movie series that you're watching right now?

Well, you know, it just ended. Game of Thrones just ended it, right? So you a Game of Thrones version?

Yes. You know, eight years, 80 years of my life. Yeah. But I've gone, gone, gone. I don't need it to do with my life. No, no. I like you know, I just finished watching the series like a good girls.

Huh? What's it about?

This is three was one mom, sister and a friend who I, you know, supposed to be good girls, but now they face something in their lives and they just like being bad girls. But in a good way, they're doing good doing bad things because they're taking care of their families.

Got it. OK, I mean, I guess the means can justify the ends to pay for what you're doing. But. OK, cool. No. On a serious note, though, what is your favorite podcast other than this one?

You know, I like a Mary can't as Americans. You see, known as what you call American life. Yeah. What's that about? Different things. They're just different topics every day.

Every time is like the podcast will be like 30. It could be from religion to to crime to politics. Yeah. You like some of those murder part? I was going to.

But, you know, I just I tried to find some of those are pretty dear. And I got really I love that they did that mystery thing. Like, you know, they're the ones that investigate murders or whatever. And then at the end of. How many episodes, 13, 20, 30, whatever is still unsolved? Like any man. Now what is going to happen?

So when as I'm plotting Ackerman's death, I'll I'll call you and one map it out so I don't get caught. Yes. Awesome. Where can people find you on social media?

Social media? Well, mine is Max teacher. That's me, Maggie. Teach teacher Facebook.

And then just Crossfit, resident Crossfit, Fairfax resident Crossfit, france. idea. You'll find it as if people in the area kind of want to reach out to you. Do you guys do you help people if they want to come in and like you? Coach development.

Oh, yes, I have. Yet a lot of you know, we have right to so many people are the little ones that will choose and they feel like they need a set of eyes to watch them. And I told them, look, my job is not just my coaches. I can help you be a better coach. Just contact me. I'll be more than happy to watch you. You have to watch me when I don't like people. It's just showing up during the summer just to watch us, coach. You're more than welcome to that.

I think people think that we say that because we feel that we need to. But that's not the case. I think we all genuinely enjoy doing. And I would absolutely do it. So, guys, take us up on the offer.

If you're in the area, if you're in northern Virginia, if you're in Virginia Beach, like one of us up, if you're in Naples, Florida, hanging out there with old people hit up Backerman, like most people in some of our staff have the time and are more than happy to help you do that.

Yes. Call my lady boss. Thank you for your time today. Have a good day. See the wife? I will.

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