104. Chris Spigner | 7 Mile Strength and Fitness

104. Chris Spigner | 7 Mile Strength and Fitness

Today Ackerman is chatting with Chris Spigner, they met Chris was up for re-validation of his level one. Chris’s name may sound familiar he use to play for the Boston Red Socks, sorry Yankee fans. Chris gets deep on what happened when he got released from the Red Sock due to injury and how he gained a lot of weight, stating it was the saddest time of this life. Examples The catalyst that creating that change in life and his Crossfit journey. Chris talk about how he learnt from Semair Staff and how he ended up in the Cayman Island coaching full time, met his wife and has a baby on the way. – The dream, but he talks about how it took time to get to this point. 

They get into the amazing work Chris and his team are doing with 7 miles. This great episode for coaching how are worried about taking that leap and don’t really know how to start with that move into full-time coaching. 

Time Stamp

(8:33) Taking the leap to full-time coaching/how Chris found crossfit 

(17:32) 7 Miles Strength and Fitness

(20:36) Actional Advice for member retention

(25:44) 7 Mile Corrective 

(31:25) Make it full time living

Social Media:

@7milecorretive
@coachchris345

Recommend book:

Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less -Greg McKeown

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Ackerman:
All right. Chris, this is I think it’s my first international. Oh, I know I had someone on from Spain the other day, your My second international,.

Chris Spigner:
Damn it.

Ackerman:
Second international episode. But Chris is a big part of my life, right? So I met you. Did we meet at your revalidation for your level one? Is that when we actually met?

Chris Spigner:
That was in Miami. Yes. That was correct.

Ackerman:
So talk about it in the book coming out. But your whole crew of Chris’s head coach, I guess you’re all kind of head coaches. Are you a head coach or just a coach?

Chris Spigner:
I’m the head coach here. But we have the de split up into basically are two morning full, full time coaches where two morning coaches were there at our two evening coaches lunch. The rest of the day.

Ackerman:
So doesn’t want to talk today about how at 7 Mile, you guys have things run very well, very efficiently. You’ve got numerous coaches that are making a full time living and not like scraping by.

Chris Spigner:
Right. Right.

Ackerman:
Good money running your own programs. We’re going to talk about your new initiative 7 mile corretive. And which I see all over. See? Walking on the beach talking.

Ackerman:
But so anyway, you guys come through is you. It was just like seven of you. I mean, I always leave somebody out. There is like everybody from Seven Mile re validating. We were at a CrossFit kingdom, which I don’t believe we’ve ever gone back to after that seminar. It was like the size of the closet I’m in right now. And just hot,.

Chris Spigner:
Hot. So hot.

Ackerman:
We you know, we joke about it. But the guys that we are with, we’re doing handstand walks in our lunchtime workout. We’re sliding.

Chris Spigner:
I remember that.

Ackerman:
It’s just so slippery. But, you know, you guys are also great. Then you invited me down to came in and that’s where I met Roz. We met at her level one in between, but we kind of continued to talk. And you guys were a big part of that. So thank you, guys.

Chris Spigner:
You’re welcome Man. Thanks for coming down and doing the nutrition seminar as well. That was really cool that we had here.

Ackerman:
And you and you met your wife there. Crossfit,.

Chris Spigner:
Yeah. She’s actually one of the one of the owners down here. So, you know, dipped my pen in the company ink and all that stuff. And now I’ve got a wife and she’s also we got a baby coming any week now.

Ackerman:
I was going to say she’s very pregnant at this point, but you can’t just brush over that. How does an employee go about dating the owner of the box?

Chris Spigner:
Well, there’s there’s five of them. And the other the other four are married. So they’re in couples as well.

Ackerman:
And some are men.

Chris Spigner:
Yes.

Ackerman:
There’s anything wrong with that? I not at all. You know, we’re limiting who your options are.

Chris Spigner:
So she started she was actually training when I first got here. We end up spending a lot of time together as I was coaching her kind of one on one. And we ended up spending a ton of time together for her to go to regionals. We went to regionals, just the two of us and everything. So things just started to blossom. After that, we actually get really like each other when we first met each other, because all she wanted to do was come metco metco mecto and run and i was like you need to lift weights. She was like, who the hell are you?

Chris Spigner:
So that was a nice first few months. But we ended up getting past that. And we’ve been together for five, six years now and get married in November of 17. And then we got a little girl on the way. It’s crazy.

Ackerman:
Ya Know And you so you’ve been at Crossfit, Seven Mile for nine years now. So you didn’t. It wasn’t like you got down there and you’re like, which one of these women am I going to go after? It took it took some time, some getting to know each other. And I’m sure there were some talks amongst the owners.

Chris Spigner:
Absolutely.

Ackerman:
Is this OK?

Chris Spigner:
Absolutely. We actually kept quiet for a while because of that. We’re like this needs to be something that’s going to be for real. Before you ever want to do anything that could harm or jeopardize my job or gym or the situation with the owner. So it was definitely something that was spoken about often.

Ackerman:
Well, the main reason I wanted to talk to you, other than really enjoying your presence here and by the way, you fixed my plan fasciitis.

Chris Spigner:
Yes.

Chris Spigner:
You do actually want to change something. So as we’re talking I got this thing from Rogue years ago at a summit. And if you’re not watching the video, it’s basically like a 12 foot piece of steel, not your 12-inch piece of steel, like a baton. But Chris When I was down and came in for the holidays, showed me this PVC drill that I’ve since passed on to a couple of members of our box. And I swear that’s what fixed my foot. I couldn’t walk.

Chris Spigner:
I remember the I remember I remember that when we both did it together the first time jokes, I was like waiting for the face. I remember when you stepped on that point, it was like, holy shit. No, man.

Ackerman:
that was PVC now I’m on to metal, I you know, as I’m I’m in this closet a lot talking to people doing work, and I kind of just do that drill that you told me, I just kind of slowly walk. So we see it moving around. It’s what you told me to do. You know, your story is so amazing because you were a high level baseball player, actually a professional.

Chris Spigner:
Yeah, I played for the Boston Red Sox for a little bit and some other kind of minor league team, professional minor league teams.

Ackerman:
And he had some serious injuries. You like no part of your arm is missing, basically.

Chris Spigner:
Everything’s still there. But I had my my career basically ended up my shoulder. I’d had a elbow surgery in college and then I had a shoulder surgery. When I got released, my shoulder hurt basically every day that I threw at a certain point. But you can’t let go of the dream. So you go out there and you throw through it. You hope one day it’s going to get better. Then I got released and then back to South Carolina and had shoulder surgery.

Ackerman:
And for those of you that only know Chris from current times, you got really heavy.

Chris Spigner:
Oh, yeah. So when I got home, I basically just took that car ride home from Florida, South Carolina, and I cried and then slowly. And then I got home and I was like, OK, that’s the end of that. My whole life had been predicated on I was going to be a professional baseball player. It’s kind of who I was, who I was, I who identified with. And I went home and I said, all right, that’s it. I’m just going to go get a job now and do what everybody else does. That basically led me to not ever dealing with the fact. I just thought that’s kind of how you proceeded on. So. Three years passed and I went from weight probably to 20 5 to 210 to two hundred and seventy two hundred seventy five pounds was the last time I got on the scale. I definitely think I was probably a little heavier than that, drinking just about four to five nights a week, smoking a couple of packs. I was drinking. It was a pretty. I didn’t realize it at the time, but after looking back, I quit. I was I was probably pretty depressed. I used to hide from my family. I used to hide from my friends. Make up stories. Hey, we’re all going to the lake today. Well, I’ve got to go do something else just because it was too hard for me to deal with and sitting member sitting on my bed one morning crying over, about to go to the job. It made me nothing. Something I didn’t want to do. I remember sitting on the edge my bed where there was a mirror in the bathroom. And I looked at it. I said out loud to myself. I said, This is the next 40 years of your life. And I don’t think I’ve ever been so sad about anything. Then that moment. Say that out loud. I’ll never forget that day.

Ackerman:
Well, and the reason it’s so important is because we have a lot of people that listen and so many Crossfit, coaches are like, I can never make that transition. I can never leave my job. And of course you can extend that to so many aspects of one’s life. I can never leave this relationship or whatever is going on. But you did it. And I want to talk about that. What was was it overnight was like I quit. And I’m doing you know, you you started coaching in South Carolina for our mutual friend Bobby Millsaps, which ultimately led to the connection down and came in. But. What was the catalyst to get you off the edge of the bed and into the box?

Chris Spigner:
So I was. I was at an Outback Steakhouse. If you have been outback, they have an appetizer, cheese fries. They’re twenty two hundred calories by themselves. And I was at a table with four other people and the table ordered appetizer, cheese fries, and I ordered an appetizer, cheese fries. So I just finished that.

Ackerman:
You were pacing like that. I can see you as the fat guy in the group like you are that guy. You’re just the fitter version now, but you’re the party.

Chris Spigner:
Yeah, that’s it. I just I just I just want to I work out and also I don’t feel that they’re pretty much let it. I went outside and I was smoking a cigarette, drinking a beer, and my strength and conditioning coach pulled back with me. He happened to walk by and had seen me in four or five years. And he walked by and he almost walked right by me. And I was like a Paul. He kind of stopped and looked at me for a and like he had no idea who I was. It never seemed like that. He was like Chris said, yeah. So we started chatting and he actually opened up the box.

Chris Spigner:
Bobby was the manager at Carolina Crossfit, and he we were sitting there talking and he looked at me and he goes, Hey, man, I just just started this Crossfit, thing. I opened up a gym. I’ll give you a month for free if you want to come in and check it out. If you know anybody else who wants to come, bring it with you. So at the time, I looked at it as cool. He knows I know some people around town, so he wants me to bring people in. That’s why he’s giving me a month for free. Looking back on it, I can see that he was extending his hand. Basically, here’s your opportunity to come help yourself.

Ackerman:
And isn’t that like so much like you’re depressed immediately you go to that negative spin on it? Yeah, he he wants something from me, not like he’s actually trying to me.

Chris Spigner:
That’s exactly what I thought. I was cool. I go in there to bring some people with me, but, you know, I get a free month at the gym and I went in the first day and we did the baseline.

Ackerman:
500 meter row.

Chris Spigner:
We did a run for some reason did a 400 meter run, which I couldn’t do. I stopped five times on a 400 meter run. I came in and I couldn’t do a single push up. I could do maybe one or two from my knees. 15 minutes into the workout. And Bobby beside me. Go on. Come on. And Brandon, her husband, is also standing there. And there’s a picture of him. And he’s just got his arms crossed. And it’s just kind of looking down at me.

Ackerman:
I mean, this is like a four minute workout and your 15mins in.

Chris Spigner:
So they stopped me and they talked to me afterwards. I left and I was like, to hell with this man. Why would anybody do this? This is ridiculous. You’re gonna make me pay to come do that. Feel like that, be embarrassed like that. And a couple days went by and I started to realize like I was just playing professional sports. And now I can’t run 400 meters without stopping four or five times. Twenty six to seven. Twenty five. Twenty six. And I couldn’t do that. So I got about a week later after the freakin soreness and the pain went away, especially my ego. I went back in and just like, all right, I’m here. And the great thing about that group of people is that if you were willing to come in and work, they were willing to help you with whatever they needed, whatever you needed. You need nutrition advice. You want to come workout at the house. Why are you here today? I mean, it just took me under their wing, and I will forever be grateful for that.

Chris Spigner:
And being honest with you that those those people are probably why I still do it today, because I feel like I owe them to help other people the way they helped me, because I don’t know if I would be here right now. Had. That scenario not popped up, changed my my entire life.

Ackerman:
How long was it from that baseline to you becoming a coach or getting your level 1,.

Chris Spigner:
2 and a half years?

Ackerman:
OK, see you stuck with it. You can’t get a job you hated.

Chris Spigner:
Yeah, I had to I had to pay for the gym. And I but I was. I was working a 9 to 5 job. And then as soon as I would leave, I would go coach or I would go learn a Carolina Crossfit,. And then on the weekends, I would go learn Bobbie’s gym. And she opened up sportive fitness firm Branton up in sports. And so I would go to different gyms and. I think Bobbie’s saw something in me like I was an athlete, so I picked up things quickly, but what I started asking was I can just follow you around. She was like, why? I was like, I just see what these people do and how happy they are. They got to pull up the first push up there. These don’t hurt and they squat. I was like, I think I’d like to do something like this. It’s just something I’m interested in. She said, Yeah, sure, you can follow me around. She’s like, don’t coach, but you could follow me around and kind of learn. And then obviously I could get my level one. And that’s kind of.

Ackerman:
Such a bobby thing to say,.

Chris Spigner:
Don’t say anything.

Ackerman:
Don’t. Don’t you say a word. That’s a Bobby say to me and I’m on staff with he people listening in. First of all, this is what you know. Two thousand eight, nine 10ish. Yeah, right. So there wasn’t a whole lot of people that weren’t the box owners coaching full time. But you still want to improve despite that, even if it’s a couple hours a week and nowadays you can coach full time for other people. A lot of people are doing it.

Ackerman:
Bobby coaches the level one for Karl and Wanda and all then meets them and says, hey, there’s this opportunity for you to move to Cayman.

Chris Spigner:
Yeah, because Carl’s wife, Wanda, they were she was going to do the majority of the coaching and she got pregnant. So they needed to find a coach. And my now wife, Jen and Bobby just happened to have stayed in touch with each other since that level one. It’s kind of like all the stars aligned. I mean, obviously, I’d worked for trying to learn for a long time, but all of these things kind of happened. And Jen reached out and that’s obvious. She knew anybody that could help them open up the brand new gym as they were splitting off from another one. And I’ll never forget it. I was working at another job because I didn’t keep them very long. And Bobby called me. She said, Hey, Bobby. She goes, you know, you love me, right? And I was like, Yeah, what’s up? She goes, Well, I’ve got you a job, but I’ve got your head coach. I got you a coaching job, but you got to move. And the way she saw the downfall of it sounded like I was going to like Antarctica or something.

Chris Spigner:
So I was like, OK, where is it? She goes, you got to move to the Cayman Islands. I was like, sweet. Where the hell was that? Right. It was in the Caribbean. But I had no idea where it was. So I talked to them. And then we got on the phone with the owners. We discussed kind of what our thoughts were, how they wanted to run the gym, how I wanted to run the gym and coach what mattered to me. We had this discussion and from that phone call a month later, I had moved my brother into my house, sold my truck and came down here for a six month contract like a probationary period. And that was nine years ago.

Ackerman:
Well, pretty forward thinking of Bobby, too, knowing she’s going to lose a friend and a coach. You know, that is as crazy as she is. She’s like that. She’d rather see you be happy and successful knowing she’s giving something up.

Chris Spigner:
She has she has she has jokingly said to me before, you know, maybe I should have taken that job. You know, maybe me. A brandon should have lived out there. Well, thank you for not always in your debt.

Ackerman:
Well, nine years is a long time. I mean, most people don’t last on the island unless they’re native. Right. For that long.

Chris Spigner:
Yeah. At a certain point, you have to start making decisions on like legally you have to do to get rolled over a kind of reset your your work permit or you have to start doing the things that kind of make yourself a permanent resident here.

Ackerman:
Or marry a one, I guess.

Chris Spigner:
Exactly. My wife has been here for two more years than I have. So she had to get her permanent residency first and legally because we’re married. I just put in my application and actually just got it three weeks ago.

Ackerman:
So you’re now Caymanay?

Chris Spigner:
No, not yet. So there’s a couple different steps. There’s a permanent residency there, naturalization and then something else like that said like fifteen years. And then you are a paper comedian. Yeah.

Ackerman:
Gotcha. And you maintain your U.S. citizenship. Is it a dual citizenship country?

Chris Spigner:
Yeah, it is. It’s also a U. It’s a it’s a British territory. So you get that as well. If you want to, you can file for a British passport as well.

Ackerman:
Nice you can go anywhere in the world. Now, Seven Mile does some things incredibly well and of course, gives you the opportunity. I know you guys work with Mad Labs, right. So you have you really develop your coaches. What? Role, did that play in your development?

Chris Spigner:
It was it was huge. We got to a point to where we were sitting down and Carl, our owner, sat us down. He was like we brought in. I want to say it was some number. Like we brought in one hundred and eighty people the year that we had this chat. And he goes, we have twelve new members still at the end of the year. And he was like, this churn rate is unbelievable.

Chris Spigner:
But the way we were kind of bringing people on it was almost just kind of too aggressive for people here. Hey, here’s an here’s an intro. If whoever else wants to sign up, here’s what we do. Crossfit,. Here’s what it’s done for me. Here’s a workout. Do you like it? Come back and show up. Well, we were starting to find that people were just getting overwhelmed with not knowing what was going on. Sometimes it’s just a lot of information. But if we had a coach going in with them, we didn’t have the connection with our clientele. But we do know. If somebody was gone, it would take two or three weeks before somebody would notice somebody was not showing up. It’s just due to how everything was run.

Chris Spigner:
Carl sat down with these numbers one day. He goes, if we get to X, it doesn’t matter if we get more people because of the churn rate that we have. It’ll never be higher than that. He’s like, Gym will never make any more money. You’ll never make it. We just kind of sat down and had this like really straightforward meeting about how we needed to change what we were doing. And Carl, I’d seen some stuff with Madlab guys. And it first, like some people, like a lot of people see some of their stuff and what they’re asking people to do and people like that doesn’t work. It’s it’s crazy. You can’t do that type of stuff.

Chris Spigner:
And. We realize what we were doing wasn’t going to keep our doors open at a certain point, so we went ahead and started going with the Madlab system. And there’s a lot more monitor coach development. There’s a lot where they break the day up. You have a certain amount of people under you that are your core tribe and you have to stay in touch with them. So I know I know so much more about my tribe members than I ever did about all of the members in the gym at one time. And it’s really made a much bigger connection to churn rate. It goes way down. You get a bit more quality leads. People who actually want to do it instead of, well, I want to try this for three months. And you spent all this time with this person, teach them how to do movements and then they bail. Right. We talk to people that are definitely in there’s a screening process to come through. And it’s been a massive difference for us in our business.

Ackerman:
So obviously, people can check out math labs. If you would like to give actionable advice and someone’s listening and being a box owner, coach, one or two, three things that you think they can do to retain members better.

Chris Spigner:
First say is do personal training. It by far and away has changed the. Outlook of the gym. We even had people when we decided to start adding the personal training as a prerequisite. You have to do personal training before you’re allowed to go into the classes. And then once you are in the classes, if we do hybrid memberships so you can do it where it’s a personal training session every week. BI weekly, monthly every six weeks or a quarter. And these are always great for sitting down a touching base. Sometimes they’re coming in, hey, I want to work on this. I’m not really good at this in class. This is what I want to get to. But a lot of those are sit down conversations. How are you feeling? What’s going on? How’s things at home? What are your goals for next time? Is the personal training has been huge for retention. Getting our members where they want to go. It’s setting a path for them. So it’s not just coming in here to train today because you’re supposed to come do your hour is well. Here are the three things you said you wanted to do. You wanted to get your cholesterol down.

Chris Spigner:
You wanted to do a pull up and you wanted to sleep better. OK. Well, let’s see if we did that three months from now or next time. How are we doing? And you can start having these check ins so that. When something starts to go off track, you can always go back to these. Hey, this is what you said you wanted to do. Is this still the same goal you were looking for earlier? That by far and away probably been the biggest takeaway. And secondly, having coaches, having members underneath a single coach. All of it. One of art, one of my clients comes to class. Any of our coaches are allowed to coach that person. But I’m responsible for making sure they’re showing up. Seeing how they’re doing, getting that personal connection. And those touch points have been. Business is changing. And especially not just for the business, but the clients are so much happier. They have access to me. We have conversations about the kids as a whole. It’s a relationship as opposed to coming in here. Cool. I saw you work out today. It’s a whole different relationship.

Ackerman:
Yeah. I mean, what we’ve talked about in other episodes with coaches is just. The best coaches in the world create those relationships, and that’s not to say they’ll never leave, but when you have that type of relationship with your clients, they’re much more than likely going to stay longer. And by the way, I appreciate you guys playing Eye of the Tiger in the background.

Chris Spigner:
A little touch of black touch of grey is going on but ya.

Ackerman:
Touch of grey. Grateful Dead even better.

Chris Spigner:
So it’s those things have been if those things have been amazing and the relationship portion of it. It’s just made it much easier.

Ackerman:
What’s your advice to box owners and coaches that say. Because I was guilty of this as well? It’s hard to get Crossfit, members to do personal training.

Chris Spigner:
So how we kind to once we kind of shifted over, we had we call it our legacy members. So the people who were already here, we did not require them to start doing personal training because they had been our members have been our founding members. Cool. You guys stay with what you got. Well, what we did decide as a group, is that OK? From here on out, everybody who does want to come join the gym is going to have to do the personal training and they will have to have a hybrid membership. At first that was really scary. Charging more. It was more time. And what we found out is that if you look at the back end, the people that wanted to do it and were willing to have I entered into this do those personal training sessions, they stayed afterwards when they went to class. They stayed there. Still a part of the community today. The cool thing about the personal training with the legacy clients is the legacy clients would see. We were doing personal training with these newer people that somebody would walk up and be like, well, why can’t I do that right? You absolutely can. Right. And then we still had people we started people to this day. We started this probably four years ago. And we saw people this day that don’t do personal training. But there’s like. In total, there’s probably eight of them out of our entire gym. Everybody else is on. On a personal training. And it’s also created. Not just personal training for people with the gym, but other people who may not who don’t want to do high intensity. They just want to come in and do something just for them. That’s it. There’s a whole other avenue of just one on one personal training and. It just opens up over other avenues for you to do things.

Ackerman:
Right, Believe it or not, not everybody wants to do Crossfit,, but everybody wants to be healthy and fit. So that’s probably a good Segway into your new program,7 Mile Corrective. You know, we have another mutual friend, Sean passed Scootch who I’ve interviewed recently for the show. I’ve known him a long time and he runs active life. Really, really good stuff out there. And you’re one of his coaches, correct?

Chris Spigner:
Correct.

Ackerman:
So where did this program come from? What’s the intention of it and how can other people implement similar things at their box?

Chris Spigner:
So it all started from I did the first active life, similar that they did in New York, which was just a flexibility assessment from the ground up. And it was just that all week. We immediately learned how to do this. And it was ingrained into us to do this is what you do ba ba ba. So I could immediately take that back and bring it to my other coaches. And just in that two day seminar, I was able to start seeing things in the gym. And we had a marathon program here as well, where I could see things with these people that normally would never want to. They don’t want to do Crossfit,. They just want to run. But I had an avenue of joy. I know why your back hurts. Why would you run? I didn’t know before. So that immediately made it where? OK, this is actionable. This is make it. This is good. This is making. This is getting me more personal training. This is me helping more people. So then I did the immersion program that they do, which also helps you learn, you know, this is what you see here, some ways to fix it in a group setting as well as on your own. But before I did that, I found something here that I started to notice was. Doctors, chiropractors, physiotherapists and coaches were rarely on the same page here. I’m not sure how it is everywhere else, but they’re really on the same page. You have clients coming in and they’re like their yoga instructors telling them they need to stretch move. I’m telling them they need to lift more chiropractors, telling them they don’t need to do X. The physiotherapist is telling them they don’t need to do it.

Chris Spigner:
The doctors telling them stop doing anything because it hurts. Right. So now you’ve got five different opinions going back and forth with this person who has any injury or is coming back from an injury. And what did they do? Well, to hell with it. I’m I’m just going to stop doing anything where they keep going and they get more hurt. So what I wanted to do was try to find a way that I can work with certain of these other health professionals. So we have two physiotherapists and two chiropractors I work with now. And what we do is we work together saying the same thing for the client or to the client after we’ve both spoken to each other. So if somebody is having shoulder pain putting their hands over their head, if I can’t instantly know why or figure out why, I will send them to one of these health professionals and then they will talk to me and we will come up with a plan to help this person. So now you have two people working together saying the same things to help you get out of discomfort or pain or whatever it is. So that was one side of it. And in the second side was, if you have somebody in your gym is constantly hurt, it starts to get annoying and starts to become demotivating. And then they stop coming and you have to hook down and then they just kind of slow down and fade away. What I wanted to do is have another avenue of that where maybe like, hey, let’s just take you out of the classes for a little bit.

Chris Spigner:
Let’s look at what’s going on. Let’s take three, six months. Let’s fix these things and go right back to doing whatever you want to do. See if anybody was interested in still using other health professionals to help me with this. And so far, it’s been extremely successful. We got almost 30 to get 13 people in this program in one way or the other. And be able to have these conversations with these other health professionals is helping these people get better. And it’s not a referral program. There’s no money being exchanged between me or the other health professionals. It’s just we want to help people get back to doing what they want to do. It’s a terrible business model with the exception of referrals. But it’s been a oh, in surgeries, people come for surgery, you go to physiotherapy, you get your range of motion back and then you come back to the gym. On Might , well start doing some kipping Pull-Ups. Right. You want to pad that because there’s there’s nobody to tell you what to do there. So we now have a space where we create that cool. If you’ve just come from the physiotherapist. You have a full range of motion of your shoulder. I talk to the physiotherapist. This is what you can and can’t. I don’t want you to do. I work outside of that. And then we work together to get you back to where you don’t need me.

Ackerman:
So, I mean, this is great. And I think really this is the direction Crossfit, is going to go, right where everybody sees Crossfit, health. That’s what it’s all about. It’s not how can you get in two years, it’s how far can you get and stay? Healthy. And if you do too much, too soon, you’re not going to do either. But he saw a lot of coaches listening. And I think with some of the people we’ve had audio you included, it’s like, oh, that’s Chris Spiner. He’s been doing this forever and he’s here. No, you started this really within the last year, year and a half. And it’s been incredibly successful. So if coaches are listening and they want to work more than two hours a week or leave their full time job like you do. What are some actionable things they can do now, whether it’s create their own corrective program or, you know, what can they do to make this a full time living like you have?

Chris Spigner:
First, the first thing we gotta do is put in time, like I know you don’t think that there is any work an eight hour day and then I’ve got to do this. But if it’s important to make it happen and I think that’s I think that’s a really important point of this. Yet things had to line for me to get where I’ll and all of that had to happen. For two years, I followed them around and I spent time that I quote didn’t have following them around, trying to learn how they were doing the things they were doing, because it was interesting to me that I wanted to somehow have it be a part of my life and then ended up starting coaching there. I think the hardest part for most people is just to take a step. It’s like, I can’t do this. It’s I don’t have any time. I can’t I’m not going to have to. I don’t want to. There’s all these other things just said going. I don’t know how this is going to work out, but I’m going to do this. Need to take this step and then evaluate what happened. Right. Taking just a little bit of action is way better than thinking about all of the things that are going.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I think I was just having this conversation today. And it’s so many people are paralyzed by thinking about what they have to do instead of, like you said, just do a little bit, you know? Oh, you think working out is gonna be so hard. But if you do 15 minutes, four times this week, you’ve done an hour of exercise is better than zero.

Chris Spigner:
That’s another monster thing is that you can’t you can have this massive, massive goal. But I’ve been there. It’s just like having somebody come into your box and go. I want to get in shape. You look at them and go, OK, stop eating crap. Sleep eight hours a night. Come in here. Five days a week. Whether what you give them all these things to do. Nothing happens. But if you look at them and you go how much water they drink? I don’t drink much. Do you think you could have three glasses of water every day? No. OK. Do you think you could have three glasses of water three days a week? Yes. Are you sure? Yes. OK, that week. Did you do that? Yes. It builds. Do you think we could do a fourth day? I think everybody wants to make stuff happen too fast. It took me three and a half years to get fat. It took me four years to get rid of it. I mean, yeah, it doesn’t disappear.

Ackerman:
And I think what gets overlooked is for a lot of us, we are goal oriented. We’re driven people. I mean, you were a professional athlete, right? But for a lot of people, this is their first exposure to fitness and you’re giving them a little wins along the way. And nasality. Oh, wow. I drank three glasses of water coach. Chris is going to be excited versus I’m letting him down now. I don’t want to show backup. And I was your person that took me a long time. And for a lot of people with me with nutrition these days, they want all of that. I’m like, hey, I need you to download my fitness pal and track for this week. In watch every track. Very cool. So what’s the goal with your program? Do you want to. Stan came and you want to send it out there, are you working with Sean and active life?

Chris Spigner:
The goal with the program as of as of now is also to create. So personally, there’s just I I don’t I’m pretty busy and I don’t want to create more hours on the floor. I want to find another way to help people without actually having to constantly be there. I’ve set I’ve I’ve gone into this mode of these are the hours I’m going to work and that’s it or I’m going to be at the gym. And that’s it, because I think as a lot of us, we want to help people. We want to get into and I’m going to be there for 10 hours a day. And then after three months of that, you’re just like, Jesus Christ, I can’t imagine going it. And it becomes a burnt out thing. And I tried that. I wanted to see if I could do it and I couldn’t. So I found a schedule that works for me. And what I want to do is I would like to build this program up enough to where I can actually have other coaches come underneath me that might be interested in doing something like that and then have that being run out of Crossfit, 7 well and have that program there. And it maybe it ends up becoming its own separate thing. I mean, that’s down the road. But being able to work with a select group of people that fit within the hours, being able to have a personal life, being able to help people and being able to make money, well, I’m not at the gym as well because they feel like when you say that as a coach, you would like to make a living, I think piece of people like I can’t believe he said that he wants to just make money by not being at the gym. I feel like that’s something in our profession that needs to be. Kind of kiboshed a little bit.

Ackerman:
Yeah, as our buddy would say, turn pro. But, you know, and it’s true. Like we talked about it all the time. Like, when was the last time you went to a restaurant and asked for a discount on your burger? No. And that’s a problem doing it for your coaching services?

Chris Spigner:
Absolutely.

Ackerman:
So, no, that’s really great to hear. And I think a lot of people will take you up on it. And I don’t think having a daughter adds more hours to your day.

Chris Spigner:
Exactly

Ackerman:
So probably a good time to do something like that.

Chris Spigner:
I Nailed it.

Ackerman:
Very cool. And like I said, if you’re listening, Ben, you gave me one drill to do, and I was working for probably two months to try to figure out how to fix my foot. And it did it. So that’s just one example. I don’t know that Chris can do that for every injury, for everybody. Worst case is you have to take a trip to Cayman. No, no, that’s a that’s not a bad place to be to get your plantar fasciitis hooked up. Well, I told you ahead of time, I was going to ask you for a book recommendation. Do you have one?

Chris Spigner:
I do. It’s Essentialism by Greg McKeown.

Chris Spigner:
It’s. Unbelievable. It’s it’s had a massive impact on my life about trying to cut things down and doing the most important thing first figuring out what needs to get done and it allows you. Just to clear some space, especially with what we as coaches are doing, a lot of times you’re at the gym and you’re on your phone in between message, in between classes with with clients and your members, and then you go home and you do some more work and oh, forget it. It just allows you to compartmentalize everything. I start realizing what are the things you want to say? Yes. To how to say no to people. It’s just a very, very interesting book. I’ve given it to probably six or seven people down here. It just creates space for you to get other things that are important to you. Done.

Ackerman:
Yeah. It’s been recommended a couple of times on the show. I’ve read it was earlier this year of not the end of last year, but it was one of my favorite books at that time and I highly, highly believe it if you’ve not read that. So. So on that topic, let me ask you, what are a few things you’ve kind of alluded to them? What are some things you’ve actually implemented in your life? Because like we said, you’re busy, you’re having a kid, you’re married, which takes time. You’re developing this basically new company while doing all of this, having a daughter. What what are some things you do regularly that people can take from that?

Chris Spigner:
I break my depth into a certain hour so I know what I’m going to do. Pretty much each day I wake up at the same time, I had the same morning routine, a workout at the same time, so that if something happens, I’m not looking at emails during those times and not looking at messages during those times. I set up hours were OK for the next 30 minutes, my phone face down. I’m doing e-mails. That’s the office hours for nothing else gets in the way of those of those 30 minutes and those e-mails. No other windows open if I’m working out for maximum time to X amount of time. Cool. I know that. But that means I have to be prepared for that. The night before. So if I’m going to eat a certain things. So it just starts to put things compartmentalized and you start to realize that just because you don’t answer that email in 30 minutes. Doesn’t mean everything’s gonna fall to shambles, so there are certain times where I don’t answer e-mail once I go home. Emails are all clients are all. It’s it’s home time. It’s my wife’s time. And my time will soon be my daughter’s time.

Ackerman:
That’s how she got pregnant, isn’t it?

Chris Spigner:
That’s pretty much how it is.

Ackerman:
Put that phone down. Let’s get it.

Chris Spigner:
We’ve something to do.

It’s very true. You know, I think too many of us are just. Just the other day, I’m like, I need to get away and I can go into the mountains and get away from this thing. And it’s like when you stop and realize now you’re in control. Someone text you. That doesn’t mean you have to get back to them immediately and they’ll still be there and life will go on and people respect that. I think it’s probably the biggest challenge in this day and age is, you know, dealing with the dingding and notifications and sounds.

Chris Spigner:
Like other other people will start to learn. Other people start to learn that your your pattern. Well, it’s after it’s after 8:00. Chris isn’t going to respond. I know. I’m going to hear from them tomorrow. And it also allows you to create your space like, hey, why don’t you message me back? Because I don’t message people back at this point at this time. Sorry. And then people either figure it out or if it’s super important, you know, they’ll find a way to get in touch with you. But you just start to realize everything isn’t as important as you originally thought it was.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And that’s how you get a few more hours in your day to follow Bobby around. And then I’ll look at it. Well, if you want to reach out to Chris, they can do it on social media. I know you have your personal coach, Chris 3-4-5.

Chris Spigner:
Yeah.

Ackerman:
What’s that? What’s 3-4-5? By the way?

Chris Spigner:
3-4-5 is the area code in Caymen.

Ackerman:
Ok. Say Coach Chris, 3-4-5 it in Seven Mile Correctives. Seven the number. Mile, active. And I’m going to actually have a couple of people that I want to send to you that I’ve been, you know, then need some programming or some stuff. You do that virtually now, right?

Chris Spigner:
Absolutely, Absolutely. Cool.

Ackerman:
Anybody on planet fasciitis, reach out reachout you are that you should specialize. Like all you handle it said itis. You can have it all time. Job doing that. Everybody. So many people have that these days.

Chris Spigner:
Everybody’s got it.

Ackerman:
And it’s really a simple fix. That’s it. Well, do it. It’s great to catch up with you. Hopefully, I’m sure we’ll see you again in the next year or so. Roz drags me down there.

Chris Spigner:
It’s terrible being dragged down here, huh?

Ackerman:
Well, if you knew her family, it would be.

Ackerman:
It’s not quite the same Vacation and everybody else gets down there. But.

Chris Spigner:
You can just stay with us.

Ackerman:
Yes, I think. I told the next time I find my own spot, but i can’t handle them, But it’s been great. Well, we’ll definitely hop in the wod. I mean, we’ve not even touched upon it. The box is amazing. Roz is always just the other day. She was bringing up something that you guys do well that she wanted to see, you know, brought to our box in mass. There’s additional work people can do outside of class. You guys. Right. You know, have people getting warmed up before class. You make sure everybody. I mean, it’s one of the most welcoming communities. It I’ve heard the coaches, every class I’ve been to, they’re always saying, hey, make sure you go shake hands with all the new people. So those things are happening. Clearly, having a good coaching staff helps. But you know, Carl and wanted the trickle down effect on everybody there. It’s a great community. And I’m proud to. I feel bad. Does every time a Cayman and it’s the only box I go to and I meet a lot of boxes and their loved ones and I come in. You know, there’s Crossfit, came in and a couple of days and like, now I got to have my doubts. So it’s great to have a relationship with you guys. I appreciate everything you guys at that.

Chris Spigner:
I appreciate it, too, Jason. Thanks a lot.

Ackerman:
All right. Well, I don’t talk to you before the baby. Good luck with everything. And it was great chatting with you. Tell Jen. Good luck with the birth. I don’t know if you’re supposed to say that, but.

Chris Spigner:
I don’t know either of you.

Ackerman:
I think your job is just to stand there and be like, you got this, honey.

Chris Spigner:
You’re killing it. Yeah.

Ackerman:
This is easier than the Crossfit, games.

Chris Spigner:
Appreciate it, Jason. Thanks, man.

Ackerman:
I have a good rest of the day.

Chris Spigner:
You, too buddy.

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