107. CrossFit Doesn’t Owe You Sh*t

107. CrossFit Doesn’t Owe You Sh*t

Hey Listener! It’s that time of the week again your host sit down and go though problem or issue that is facing the Crossfit community and you might be able to guess it’s all about the perception that Crossfit Hq should be doing more directly for the affiliate. This topic has come up multiple times on past episode. More recently enough HQ is getting tired of them constantly getting fired at about it too. They discussed all the gripes that they have heard multiple times from Affiliates owners. Why have changed the games? Why don’t have social media? What does your affiliate fee actually get you? What is owner affiliate entitled to? – Short answer nothing.

As they said:

“We are sick of the complaining…”

Mostly importantly listeners if you have opinions and comments we want to hear from you!! 

Timestamps:

(8:42) All of the gripes

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Ackerman:
All right. We are back Best hour of their day. Lot of people, a lot of people are reaching out to me the about 50 blacksuqat spots.

Todd:
Dude, you. I can't believe it. I am impressed.

Ackerman:
This is this is our first talk since it happened when I was out of breath. And, you know, we were all kind of reeling in the excitement of me finishing. But now that you guys have had a week to reflect on it, I'm sure you've thought a lot about it. What are your what are your thoughts a week later Fern?

Fern:
I have not thought about it since I told you I was proud of you. I think I did. So I had a very brief moment when you're doing I was like, you set us up for this like you already knew we could do. This is like you lowballed it. So I feel like you kind of. Mailed, but in a little bit like I don't really, yeah,.

Todd:
What watching you do it, I realized it was not merely the feet that I once thought it was. That being said, you still accomplish the task. So that was good. But now it's like probably 80 percent of the members at our gym, both men and women could do one in five or 50 reps in our affiliate. I'm pretty sure.

Ackerman:
I think what you're saying is you're upset that I was confident and something I could do. I told you all along, I can do it. How is that?

Todd:
I'm not upset. I'm not upset. It's your confidence. I think I'm proud of you, man. You did great. Looked Good doing it, too.

Ackerman:
I agree. I said afterwards, I don't think I said to you guys, it's either. Either this is more impressive than I realized because I didn't think it was a big deal, like I was like I should be able to do this or people really had no faith in my fitness.

Fern:
Maybe a little both.

Todd:
A little bit of both. And I'm now it. What it also does is it takes me back to those twenty one front squats at one eighty five. And I'm trying to figure out what was going on there because you would think with 50 back squats at one eighty five with no issue.

Ackerman:
Now, No,.

Todd:
If we were if we were gonna approach that workout before, I would assume that you'd be able to do twenty one. So the fact that you got to like twelve before you'll start to die, that was I'm just I'm unsure of who you are as a athlete at this point. But.

Fern:
Or or maybe because he's been spending time just moving better in order to move better.

Todd:
Oh yeah.

Fern:
He's just fitter.

Ackerman:
How about that quote, I got a lot of shares it pretty profound.

Todd:
Yeah. Try to move better. That's a that's an interesting concept there.

Ackerman:
Well I mean I think eventually going to compare everyone's backs, but typically. 30 percent heavier than their front squats there's that.

Fern:
To say. I was going to say 120. A hundred thirty percent. Probably?

Ackerman:
Yeah. So and then throw into there that there's just no place to rest with the Front squat. Is that. That's why I like on the backs when I'm just resting half the time.

Todd:
So I don't know man. You look pretty restful when both of your arms were out in front of the Frankenstein version of the front squat. That will be the next challenge. I think I can do that. There was also a lot of hype on it.

Ackerman:
\Do what? The twenty one and one eighty five Front spots.

Todd:
No, no, not just that. It needs to be the at work out with every set unbroken.

Ackerman:
Without a time frame. That's not as you can rest.

Todd:
No, no. It needs to be like that. It needs to be maintaining the stimulus. It's stimulus to the workout which was what, like sub 10 minutes. Eight minutes.

Ackerman:
Let me let me think about that. I think it helped that there was so much hype going on at the summit as well.

Todd:
Yeah, that didn't hurt anything at all.

Ackerman:
All right. So let's dive into this week's topic. You know, if you if you're listening and you still want to reach out to congratulate me about the backsquats, well, that's that's fine. Take your messages. I'll take your gifts and adulation. But we're going to talk about a really serious topic today, something that's at least near and dear to my heart.

Ackerman:
Where I get frustrated about it is the overall consensus that Crossfit, owes us something. And maybe that's a really Broadway of putting it. We were kind of discussing before we got on how do we set this up appropriately? But I think everyone in this day and age is getting a little too entitled by their expectations of Crossfit, HQ owes them. Recently there was a post in the in one of the affiliate owners group. We're not going to use names or read the post directly, but if you're in those affiliate groups, I'm sure you know, we're talking about. And if you don't, we'll find it. But someone complained about Crossfit,. A day later, he got an e-mail from Coach Glassman taking away his affiliate. So first and foremost, let's just look at that from that perspective, Fern. What do you think about that move? Coach Glassman just basically slapping his balls on the table today, saying your affiliate it is gone well.

Fern:
So there what? What is interesting to me is that a lot of people thought that was inappropriate, but I. That is just really confusing to me. I don't know why that's inappropriate. You have somebody who is complaining that they don't want to be a part of the community more. And Todd brought up a good point before we hit record, which is if you had a member in your gym who is like this gym is garbage, like, I don't want to do this anymore. Can you guys change the programming? What would you tell them?

Todd:
Yeah, I mean, that's that's an easy one. That's what when I heard this story someways tell me about it this weekend. And they were, you know, having the argument on each side. And that's that was the point that I brought up. It's like somebody came into my gym, was telling myself and the other people in my gym how bad the programming sucked and how that facility wasn't a coaching suck. I'd be like, then don't be a part of this place. Why would you want to be a part of something that you don't appreciate or like? And I would send you on your way. So I don't see why that's there's such outrage on the fact that that's what coach did. I don't like my product. Don't use my product. Don't be a part of my community. Go somewhere else. Do what you think is appropriate for you. That doesn't make any sense to me.

Fern:
And what I was going to say is this brings up a good that's a good segue way, because a lot of this discussion stems from people who are wanting to rebrand their gym. And there's there's multiple discussions to be had here.

Fern:
And one of the big ones that I'll bring up in a little bit is one that people have not thought of. Right. But people are rebranding. So, for instance, if you listen to our previous episode with Stu Brower, like he did a kind of a seminar on that, and I like to do I think he does a lot of things really well.

Fern:
And I think a lot of Crossfit, affiliates should be taking some of the information that he's using and using for their Crossfit, affiliates. I don't, however, totally agree with with Stu on re-branding right here. Here's the situation. I think you should rebrand. You don't believe in Crossfit, anymore. You don't want a program and you know what to do. Crossfit, anymore than re-branded. Don't do it. Just like we wouldn't want you in the gym. The Crossfit, community doesn't need you because when somebody walks into your gym and is expecting Crossfit, and they find something else, you're hurting the brand. So just rebrand and call it, you know, JayZ 50 back squat fitness or whatever you want to call it. Like it doesn't matter.

Ackerman:
But here's the deal. If you do that, you can't be doing Crossfit,,.

Fern:
Right? Yeah. This is this is the point that I've been bringing up to people, which is like you, if you just want to drop your affiliation and continue to do what you're doing. Listen, I'm going to the first one to tell you like I'm going to report you for IP theft. Like, you can't just use the methodology and everything and forfeit the affiliate because you don't want to pay three grand because Crossfit, not giving you anything. And the reality is nothing's changed. They weren't giving you anything. All of the things that you're talking about beforehand.

Fern:
So this whole this whole conversation is ridiculous. And going back to where you started, this is like I don't know where all the sudden everybody thinks that Crossfit, owes them something. They gave you a business for nominal fee.

Todd:
And by the way, whether you. You drop the brand, you drop the name of Crossfit,, and you take away whatever part of the program that you don't like. Maybe it's Olympic weight lifting or heavy days or whatever it is if you're still doing it constantly varied functional movements that have high intensity, guess what you're still doing? Still Crossfit,.

Fern:
Yeah. You don't come up with that idea. Yeah. By the way, so that's always the interesting thing.

Todd:
You hear people that disagree with the programming or disagree with a couple of the movements. But by for the most part, they're still doing the big part of the program. Their functional movements. They're very in the workouts. They're adding intensity. Hello that's that's Crossfit,.

Ackerman:
And the truth of the matter is we spoke about it on our affiliate gathering episode is if you're afraid of doing some of those movements, it's probably because you're not a good enough coach. So what are the major gripes that we hear this day in age from the affiliate owners? I mean, whether it's at a level one or level two or just people reaching out to us, let's kind of categorize what the big ones are and understand why. Those we still don't have the right to be upset about.

Todd:
I think one

Ackerman:
Let me rephrase? You have the right to be upset. It's a matter of whether or not you have a right to an answer.

Todd:
Yeah, I mean, I think the first one started with the changes to the games last year, right? That was the first thing that rolled out that everybody started losing their mind with the elimination of regionals. And now we've got sanctionable and the bigger influx of people that are qualifying for the games with national champions and all of that kind of stuff. No one look at how the games went down last year. I don't know about you guys, but that was the best games that I was a part of. And I hear that time and time again from people who were there. As far as the coverage was concerned, I heard that that was just as good as it had been in years past. And the people that I heard complaining the most about that were people that were like the marginal like regional est athletes that now didn't have that to work towards. Well shoot now there's twenty seven or whatever it is, twenty six twenty eight sanction alls. You have a lot more opportunity to be relevant as a Crossfit, athlete than you did before. Previously if you didn't make it to the games and do well in the games, what kind of sponsorship were you going to get? How could you make a living doing this nowadays with twenty seven or twenty eight sanction alls? You can be a guy that shows up to, you know, five or ten of those a year finishes in the top ten and you're gonna be relevant. You might not ever the games and you're probably still going to be pretty relevant and maybe turn this thing into at least a career for a little bit awhile. So there's a lot more opportunity to be a quote unquote, professional Crossfit, athlete. I think in this environment than there was in the previous environment. So same deal. I think people were were freaking out based on change, which all of us do. Right. We're not usually excited about that. But if you take a step back and you look at it, there is way more opportunity now than there ever was before. And I think the result of the games last year, I think the direction things are going. It's only going to continue to get better.

Ackerman:
I think if you compare to Crossfit,, a bigger sports that have been around a long time, you know, first Crossfit, games are 2007 and evolve. You know, you can sign up now and it's hard to qualify. Now they've changed it a little bit to look at some other sports. I mean you can take a look at the UFC which in nineteen ninety three you could bite and punched in to the balls. Right now those are the rules where there are no rules. All of a sudden twenty nineteen and I mean the rules changed just a few years later. But without those evolutions a UFC wouldn't be what it is today. People every Saturday around gather around watch pay per view events and I'm sure you can find this similar changes in baseball, right? At some point a and a different leagues in a designated hitter rule all those things and saying if sports have to evolve based on what we need and that's how this is, people are just losing their mind about it.

Fern:
You know, the the regionals thing makes so little sense to me that I but I have a real almost no patience for the conversation.

Fern:
Like the opportunity for somebody to qualify for the games has gone up 300 percent, 300 percent, meaning there are three times as many opportunities to qualify to go to the games. And there are three times as many spots to qualify to go to the games as a male or a female athlete.

Fern:
Like, what are you talking about? I do not understand what the complaint is about. OK, so you are a regional level, gym, in you know, OK, the format is different now. Just be the person who dominates water, kaluza or the Dubai Championship or whatever. But if you're holding on to the past and being romantic about your region, just what nobody cares. Like nobody gives a shit about your region. Like it doesn't matter.

Ackerman:
Well, I think that forced a lot of people that we're training. Overtraining and with too much volume to really analyze, hey, what should I be doing? And I've seen numerous people just even at our box change their regimen, change how much volume and and actually become fitter, healthier and happier. There is no reason to be doing what they were doing, they were just spending three hours a day at the gym to make it to 40th place at regionals, where now they've realized, hey, I can just be healthy, I can come in, I can train, I can have fun again. And it's it's. Fun to see them really enjoy. Crossfit, again.

Ackerman:
So let's gripe. Number two?

Todd:
Probably be the social media piece, right, coming off social media for Crossfit, HQ. And I would argue that if you were simply to look at your social media feed and I had not told you that Crossfit, HQ was no longer on social media, would you realize that there's any tool like that? They're not on there? Like, is there any less Crossfit, content on your social media feed? My guess is probably not. So it's out there. There's still plenty of content. In fact, I would argue that there's probably more content now because there's a bunch of people out there that are creating and producing content that's outside the walls of Crossfit, HQ. And beyond that is as an affiliate owner, like it's up to me to produce my content. You know, I very rarely saw hey, I saw this video on Crossfit, Crossfit, h cuz Facebook page and I'm going to come to your gym. It's more so. Hey, I saw this video on your Facebook page. I see that you're in the area. I'm going to come to your gym. So.

Ackerman:
I think I agree with that same and I think more importantly, it became why didn't Crossfit, tell us this? They did this out of nowhere. So from what? What do they owe us in those scenarios? You know, what is whether I'm paying an affiliate fear, I'm just a Crossfit, member. What does h.G you owe me an explanation. When they decide to get rid of social media?

Fern:
this is going to sound harsh, but nothing they owe you. Nothing. That is. Coach Greg Glassman is company. He owes zero people explanation for any decisions that he makes. And if you don't like it. It doesn't matter if you like it. Like he literally answers to nobody. And if you don't like that idea, it still doesn't matter. And like Todd said, I mean, I can just tell you from my affiliate, number one, none of my members really paid a whole lot of attention to Crossfit, dicom.

Fern:
Anyway, I have seen zero effect on my business with regard to influx of people. As a matter of fact, we had some crazy months in October and 'scuse me in September and August. As far as influx of people. Gues what? NO Crossfit, social media.

Fern:
Right. So if there is this weird delusional idea that somehow the big Crossfit, media machine was feeding everybody's affiliates when it absolutely was not. They took it away and people realized that there is not this overarching media production. And now they realize that the rest of us are now kind of on the hook, if you will, to produce that content, like Todd said. But my argument is you should have been doing that before anyway. I mean, we've talked about this before. My brand does not Crossfit, dicom. It is Crossfit, rife and Todds is drive fitness and you know, in North Naples, Crossfit,. So it's one of those things works like it doesn't matter. Like if you're not doing those things, then you're not getting business because of the things that you are not doing. Not because of something that Crossfit, is doing.

Ackerman:
Well, I think, as you were saying, that I was most to take you guys, for example. You know, you're assuming your affiliate fee is somewhere between five hundred and three thousand dollars. A lot of people have more invested in publicly traded companies than they do for their affiliate fee, but they don't expect to know what's going on their social media.

Fern:
You don't get to say so there either. I mean, Todd, this is more your swim lane, but that's not a thing, right?

Ackerman:
Todd's got more invested in Apple than his affiliate fee costs. Right. I assume or Starbucks or whatever you're invested in these days. But you wouldn't be mad if the CEO Starbucks changed their social media and didn't tell you.

Todd:
Agreed.

Fern:
Yeah. You know, you might be mad, but you don't get a say so in it. Right.

Ackerman:
Yeah. I think people have this misconception about what the affiliate fee represents. And I think that's really the argument here. What do you get for your five hundred thousand it wherever you came along the line of affiliate fees. What do you what do you get for that? Maybe we can make that more clear for people listening. What do you get for that fee?

Todd:
Well, coaches talked about the things that we can't afford to do. So they are fighting for our ability to continue to train people they are dealing with and fighting. You know, the corporations out there like Coke and Pepsi that are that are trying to prevent us from being able to do what we want to do. So those are battles that there's no chance that we would have the funds or the resources to win. And so I appreciate the fact that they are doing that.

Ackerman:
Is there any other argument that people are making these days about what they are entitled to in the Crossfit, world?

Fern:
The direction of the company, I think is the other one. Meaning shifting away from you. When Crossfit, shifted and that was very subtle, but they remember when exactly was. But it was 2019 when Coach Grossmann kind of announced it is like Crossfit, is no longer a fitness company. It is a health company. And a lot of people kind of have beef with that. And again. Number one, you don't get a say so. But number two, I don't think it changes anything. I think the trouble is people are figuring they're struggling with how to navigate now because they were just on this weird blind autopilot before, which is also not a good at good idea. But now I think this whole thing is starting to wake people up. They need to have some direction from my company. I need to have something to do that is unique with my brand. I need to have systems in place for social media and marketing and how my brand is perceived. Where everybody was just banking on the overall perception of Crossfit, is how my brand is perceived.

Yeah, and I mean, personally, I feel the direction of Crossfit, and pushing towards Crossfit, health. I think it started around the first of the year. If you go back and if you look through a dot com, there's some great stuff on there. And like you've discussed on the previous podcast, Fern, it's not, you know, B to C to be to be business right now. And that's what the goal is. Hey, can you go on there, become a better coach to provide to your members? You know, the truth is, most of your members are not going to Crossfit, dot com anyway. Most of your members are going to drive a RIF if that at all. I mean, at this day and age, do many of your members still go to the Web site regularly?

Todd:
Probably not.

Fern:
They do, because we push certain things there. However, I mean, this is a different discussion about the repurposing content, but our our Web site and this is a shift we made years ago. So in 2007 and 2008 and even before that. But probably from that like mid 2000s until 2010, maybe 2012 as late as then. A lot of people were using the Web site. And largely this is because like social media was not where it was, as were they directed their members like people were. It was basically a place to everybody owned a blog, essentially like it was not at a Web site as we know them today. But you owned a blog where you put your Crossfit, work out and you did that. And then and then at some point that shifted because you realized like that is not where I should be pointing my members like that. It should be an entry point for new leads or potential customers, which changes what that should look and feel like and what should be housed there. We still have those things in there, but largely our Web site is used for capturing and converting. Not like where my people look at a workout.

Ackerman:
So with all that being said, what our affiliate owners entitled to, I mean, I want this to be the end all discussion here. I'm really frustrated with people complaining about it. I'm tired of arguing about it. I just tell people you're not entitled to anything. You get to use the name Crossfit,. It's a license. That's what you get. You get to use the name. You get to tell people that you do Crossfit, and you get to use the methodology. And chances are if you're complaining, you still want to use the methodology because nothing is better. Nothing is better than Crossfit,, whether it's for elite fitness or whether it's just to chase health or whether it's just to look better naked. Crossfit,, what's going to get you there? And everybody knows that. So what what's your what's your final word on the topic? Todd?

Todd:
Yeah, I agree with you, it's like that's that's what we get is the name at this point. The power of that brand and that name is is is valuable. Whether you like it or not, I just look at the people that are walking in my door now. Early on, you know, ten, twelve years ago, it was all the hard charges that people who were really fit anyways and looking for a new challenge and kind of a little bit messed up in the sense that they were looking for something that was really, really hard. Nowadays, the model is changed. All of those people are already doing Crossfit,. So now the new people that are walking in the door are ones that are pretty deconditioned. They are out of shape. They're looking to get in shape. And so like the regionals. Any of that kind of stuff really doesn't matter to them and it doesn't matter to me as a business owner. I want those people coming in the door. And I think at this point to to have, you know, information and the message coming from HQ that's talking about Crossfit, health and showing improving that Crossfit, now is for everybody.

And not just those, you know, high performing or elite level athletes that does nothing but help my business. I think I was one of the lucky ones. I talked my mom into doing Crossfit, in 2009 and she's been doing it since then. But a majority of her friends and the people around her were like, there's no way I can do that. That's way too hard for me. And nowadays the the message has changed and people have seen that it is for them at their age and their ability levels. And that's done nothing but help my business. And I'll be honest with you, I like dealing with those people a lot more than the ones that come into my gym and try to think that they're going to qualify for something anyways, cause I find that most of them are a lot like JAY and the fact that they're divas and they're really worried about their workouts or think that the programming matters. Reality it doesn't.

Ackerman:
They can't do 50 grunts.

Todd:
Most of our members can. Most of my members for sure. What's your final opinion?

Fern:
A lot of what Todd said. Right. So like what you're entitled to as you get to use the name, you're entitled to that overarching legal protection that none of us will ever really be privy to or understand, like what the repercussions of that are. But.

Fern:
It's a big deal. The licenser things that they're combating, the money they're spending there is a big deal both on fitness and nutrition. All of that stuff and. I just think that it's really one of these things where a lot of people are now understanding that they now have to shore up some weaknesses within their business.

Fern:
If you were relying on forget. Crossfit,, if you were relying on any entity to do something for you and you are an entrepreneur like that is a vulnerability that you need to just sort out. It doesn't matter what it is like. You have to figure that out. And largely it's the social media or the direction of Crossfit,. And I would argue that neither one of those things should be your direction or your media for your brand because it's unique. Like if you haven't figured that out, like that's the first thing I would do. Like, what is your brand? What do you want? What do you want people to say about your brand? You need to figure that out for your own business. And then from a standpoint, I really do want to beat this drum about legally. If you're just going to drop your affiliate and continue to do Crossfit, like you have major legal repercussions coming your way at some point, at some point you're going to get a cease and desist letter that says, hey, you're doing Crossfit,. You just decided, dude, for whatever reason, you didn't want to pay three thousand dollars to do that. So you can't continue to use the brand. Now, again, if you want to do something else and if you want to go the ways of the apps that Barry's bootcamp and just change your your program and your methodology as a whole, then by all means do that. The other side of that coin, which I think is even worse or or potentially more ignorant, is there's a lot of. Because I had somebody hit me up yesterday. They're like, hey, they want to rebrand because Crossfit, is stupid, right?

Fern:
A I think that's a complete cop out. Number one, because you know what? For whatever reason, people thought that yesterday. But all the sudden you're worried about it today. And then my question is, what are you doing about that? If you're just sitting around and complaining, well, then I can't help you, like you should've been doing something about that, whatever. Which goes back to how people perceive your brand. But the other thing that I see is like you generally when somebody rebrands it accompanies a lot of other changes. It's not like I just changed the name. Right.

Fern:
I changed the name because somebody got a hold of me and basically said, you have terrible business practices. You need to put systems in place. You need to put all these other things in place. And then they attribute the brand to switch to their success. When the brands switch was literally the last thing, all you did was put good business practices on your business.

Fern:
So what you should do is just do that with your Crossfit, gym and and get better at that. Right. And it's just this weird kind of backwards.

Fern:
Idea that like somehow changing the brand is gonna make all these people flood into your gym when it is absolutely not going to happen like this, not how it works if I buy change Crossfit, right to write fitness. Nothing is going to change with regard to the number of people that walk in my door like zero. Anything that changes is going to be a direct reflection of things that I do to make people come in the door. Almost nothing to do with the brand. So that's that's my two cents.

Ackerman:
I think we did a good job explaining to people that basically they have no right to be frustrated with Crossfit,. Crossfit,. Is it a billion dollar businesses, these days.

Fern:
Billion dollar industry

Todd:
I don't know J. I'm just trying to get five hundred members at my gym and just sell it for a million dollars because it's easy they say.

Ackerman:
It's easy. So the point is, I think. You know, let's let me rephrase phrases for our affiliate owners that are listening. We've all been there. The three of us voted affiliate's and we've all made decisions. Not every member loved. And they complained about it. Maybe behind our backs, maybe too, our faces. But it was because they felt entitled because they were paying member and we probably all have that in certain areas of our life. You know, Todd was upset that Burger King started offering the impossible burger and he don't dare to turn it on at all.

Ackerman:
So but point B, hey, you're you're entitled to your opinion. You can gripe. But at the end of the day, Burger King or your affiliate or coach Glassman, they're all making decisions that they believe are best for their business. And at the end of the day, we can't really argue with that because we don't run the business. We don't know what goes through his head. We don't know what he's trying to accomplish it. You know, by to leave his legacy. But we're lucky enough that we get to use the affiliate model and use Crossfit, in our in our name. And maybe the three of us are too biased. I don't know. Is that possible? I mean, I'm sure it is.

Fern:
Yeah. I mean, I'm 100 percent biased. I'm not going to deny that. But but I still think I have the ability to be objective. Like, for instance, nothing that any of us have talked about is entirely subjective in nature. Like all the things we talked about for the most part could we could measure any one of those kind of talking points in some way, shape or form. You know what I mean?

Ackerman:
Yeah. All right. Well, we hope that helps. If you if you have heard people complaining, share this episode with him and feel free to send him directly to us, they can. DMI Sun best hour of their day on Instagram and other areas, but we're happy to have an open dialogue about it. I just had gotten to the point where I'm frustrated of hearing it, frustrated of seeing it on social media and and wanted to address it. So hopefully we did Crossfitters know you anything. You're unhappy with it. It's very simple. Disaffiliate and stop using the Crossfit, methodology. Most people are not willing to do that. They want Coach Glassman to give them a text asking them if every decision he's about to make is acceptable. And that's not not going to happen. I mean, he texts me and I give him something solid. I give those of solid advice. I mean,.

Todd:
It's easy.

Ackerman:
I was the direction for the couch on the new Web site. I told them, hey, let's get a floral couch. Let's do this thing right in there. But, hey, I think it's going to do nothing but grow the brand. It's going to help the world. And I think it's great at the affiliate level. People just have a little bit of patience.

Ackerman:
Hi, guys. That's it.

Fern:
Done.

Ackerman:
Hopefully that helps. We'll be back next week with more. Episode some great interviews coming up. Yes, this week so far we've had Sean Woodland. We had our episode with 50 back squats and then some other great episodes coming in for an hour.

Ackerman:
You're gonna be on the road. Hey, if you are in a box in Raleigh, North Carolina, it is up immediately. You might swing by. All right. Thank you, guys. Later.

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