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108. Christian Lucero | Pardon Me

108. Christian Lucero | Pardon Me

On to episode, Jason Ackerman sits down with Christain Lucero 2016 Crossfit Games 18th finisher and multiple regional athletes since 2013. Owner of Grip Tight Tape and runs his own podcast Pardon Me with Christian Lucero.  Christain and Ackerman dive into so many different topics like sleep, what it takes to make it to the games, the social pressure that athletes face, and the social pressures that face athletes. While Christian is pretty cool dude –  wife Jessica Lucero is much cooler is looking to qualify for 2020 Olympic. This is a great episode for what going in the world of CrossFit. 

Time Stamp: 

(2:52) High-level athletes couples
(6:10) Sharing a bed before the comp/ The importance of Sleep
(9:10) 2016 Games
(18:11) Staying at this level of fitness – social pressure 
 (25:02) Games Changes affecting every level 

Podcast:  

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pardon-me-with-christian-lucero/id1455560124

Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfbzTnqwspGJBk5QcYuC9FA

Grip Tight Tape:

@griptighttape
Griptighttape.com 

My State App. – recommend breathing app.

Recommended books:

Games of Throne 

Social Media: 

@christianvluc

Sponsor Shout out:

Brain Co.

@Brainco_tech

Christian Lucero .mp4 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Christian Lucero .mp4 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2019.

Jason Ackerman:
All right, I'm here with Cristian Lucero. Do you say Lucero, Lou-Lou Cero,.

Christian Lucero:
I say Loose Cerro.

Jason Ackerman:
Oh, yeah. I feel like it's a pet peeve of mine when people like you can say it anyway and it's like, no, what's your name?

Christian Lucero:
I say, Lou, Cerro. Yeah,.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, it's your name. So I'll start saying Lucero. But for those wondering who Christian Lucero is, you probably recognize it from the Crossfit, Games 2016.

Christian Lucero:
Yes.

Jason Ackerman:
18TH Place.

Christian Lucero:
Yes. Longer hair back then. So.

Jason Ackerman:
Long hair.

Christian Lucero:
Some people don't recognize me because of the hair.

Jason Ackerman:
You know, I'm a fan of long hair, obviously, when you pulled it off pretty well. Good looking dude. I need to keep long hair because I'm not as good looking. I got a mask I need on its face.

Christian Lucero:
Draws attention away.

Jason Ackerman:
From my nose. So You also might know Christian. You've got a great social media, but you also have your podcast, pardon me, with Christian Lucero.

Christian Lucero:
Yes,.

Jason Ackerman:
You have your tape company grip type tape.

Christian Lucero:
Yes. Yeah. A couple of things I just started in the past past year, less than a year, but since the New Year, those are kind of some of the things that I had been wanting to start and had the opportunity to start. So especially with the Crossfit, game season being kind of up and down in flux, not a lot of there's a lot of unknowns with this season progressed this year, especially the most kind of which kind of there's some qualifications that aren't going to be in place next year. And so it's kind of more of a transition year as they implement all the sanction alls and get that going. So I was like, hey, it's as good a time as any to start those things. And I also wanted to. Gives give support to my wife who's getting ready for, you know, in process of qualifying for 2020 Olympics for Tokyo, she's a weightlifter. So you have a lot of those competitions. The World Pan Championships, Pan Am Games all coincide with a lot of the Crossfit, competition. So I wanted to be able to help her with her journey as much as I could. And if that meant me taking a year away from the games, you know, that's not a big deal. There's the games every year, but the Olympics is only every four years. And ideally, this is going to be her last Olympic quad. So I was kind of wanting to put that that goal in front of any of my own Crossfit, goals this year.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, just briefly, before I get into that, I asked my wife right before I said, hey, I'm going to talk to Christian. Anything you want to say. And she said, I love his tape, so.

Christian Lucero:
Oh, sweet. Awesome.

Jason Ackerman:
I think you gave her some a Wodpalooza. And.

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, I saw her

Jason Ackerman:
She swears by it and she's very particular with her tape just so you know.

Christian Lucero:
So. Yeah. Yeah. That's so that's good to hear. I'm glad to hear that man. That's encouraging.

Jason Ackerman:
But you bring up Jess. You know, I guess the question is. What's it like having two high level athletes living together? It sounds like you're saying I need to take a backseat to focus on my wife. I'm sure there times she does the same. Is it stressful, both of you, competing at such a high level?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, I mean, there are big stresses with that. I mean, any family, any family or any individual that that has a family that has one athlete competing at a high level, you know, at that at that level, we'll tell you how stressful it is, let alone to. And it's almost like you need to. For us, we've found the best way. You know, it's come with some trial and error as far as knowing what the other person needs when we're competing or prepping for a competition or getting close to that competition time. Obviously, moods change and, you know, tempers are a lot shorter than they normally would be. When you guys when each one of you is getting ready for competition, you have a little bit less leeway for anything else other than that particular goal at hand. So it's just about understanding and communicating. I feel like we've had to had to understand how the other person communicates best and understand what they need in that time and really build up our teams and our systems around us. You know, our teams around us, coaches, training partners, our support systems, because if we both are competing and we have a competition at the same time, you know, we can't really lean on the other person for that support as much as we would be able to if they didn't have a competition around that time. So, yeah, it's it's tough and it's it's taken some getting used to and it's it's definitely I think we've got it to a point where we can where we can figure out what the best thing to do. Sorry, hold on Ray. Ray. Ray.

Jason Ackerman:
Is that one of the pugs? Let's taken He's taking this headphones out so. I'm getting play by play it.

Christian Lucero:
Sorry my dog wanted to jump in on the conversation.

Jason Ackerman:
That's funny. That's the pug, right?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah. That's her. Yeah. So, yeah, I think it's just taken some getting used to and some figuring out what's the best way to to handle that and to go about that. And how do we do that? I think it's the biggest thing is building up those support systems around us and understanding how the other person what how the other person needs them to be or us that person to be there for them when they are competing and understanding. If we are competing at the same time, we're not going to be able to to be there 100 percent for them in the ways that they might need. And not taking that personal and not taking that as like a an attack on the relationship or on your goals or what you have going on here.

Jason Ackerman:
And here's something I've often wondered about competitors. When you when you're getting ready to compete or she is, do you guys share a bed the night before a competition?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, like in the in the biblical sense or just like in a city, that's one thing.

Jason Ackerman:
I mean, feel free to chime in on that. What do you mean? Yeah. I'll tell you like Roz, I sure bed there are nights. I'm like, damn. What were you doing in your sleep last night? You kept me up. Yeah.

Christian Lucero:
Yeah. So we. Yeah, we normally do. Yeah. We normally share like if I'm in a bar or in the. The same happens where we're not even in the same state. We're both competing at this same time, so we really don't have that issue. But other times when we are together, yeah, well we'll share a bed because we we I don't think we've ever. I mean unless unless we've been in a fight and I've messed up or I've I've gotten kicked out of the bed, I don't think we've ever had times and we've been at the house we, don't sleep together in the same bed. And I know a lot of people have like superstitions like, oh, don't have sex the night before you compete or I I feel like that's come from like fight culture. It's like, don't wanna have sex a full month out while you're in fight camp. No sex. And then the night before, no sex. I feel like they've debunked that sense and said that whatever you're used to doing. So if you usually have sex, continue to do that. Don't shy away from that the night before. Or if you don't and you you don't usually have sex, don't. All of a sudden do something different the night before. So it's all about like keeping consistency, I think. So you usually have sex. Go for it. If you don't, then don't. So I think we're kind of in the boat of like kind of whatever happens, happens. We don't really keep keep to a schedule, you know.

Jason Ackerman:
I mean, more so just because sleep is so valuable when you're getting ready for the Olympics. You needed to sleep in if you're tossing and turning. I'd be more worried about how I'm sleeping and the impact my wife. Yeah. First off, it's your time. It sounds like I think I've said this to a lot of the games athletes I've spoken to that you guys sleep abnormally well.

Christian Lucero:
Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I do. I know I sleep well. My wife, not so much. She's more of a light sleeper. So it is in the realm of possibility that I would be tossing and turning and waking her up. But we usually. We we try to get a king size bed where we go. So we have enough room for me to toss and turn and for her to be out on the other side of the bed and not be bothered by it. But I feel like the a lot of people think about the night before competition, and I feel like those that week leading up or than the couple nights before really where you get your you're really good sleep. So if you don't sleep really well, then the day or the night before the competition, as you slept well, the week leading up or the few days before that, you can kind of overcome a bad night of sleep the day before or the night before.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, let's dive into one specific event.

Christian Lucero:
Yes.

Jason Ackerman:
In 2016. You're speaking to sleep? Yeah. We're in the event where Dave Cash decides the night before. Hey, by the way, you guys, you're gonna need to pack a bag and be ready to go to the next morning.

Christian Lucero:
Yeah.

Jason Ackerman:
Not just not knowing what's going on, but I mean, most of you probably I know I set my alarm for like 2 in the morning. We did get out. We had to show for you guys around. How does that impact your day? Just that had four hours of sleep. The food. And then, of course, the unknown of the workouts ahead of you.

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, the that was that was crazy. Like you said, we had to be up at I think we had to be in the lobby at what was at 3:30 or 4, something like that. And then bags packed, ready to go. That can, you know, especially when you're kicking off a at that. I think we did. It was that Tuesday. We had an event Wednesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, a five day event with a workout every day. We didn't have a rest a rest day on that in that games. I think that can especially that that being your first day kicking off a five day event that can really throw things off for you. So I think you were asking about what was going through my head or how do you prep for that? I think yeah, it was it was I think definitely more so than the stress or anticipation of the night before knowing you have to get up that early, not knowing really what you're gonna be doing can affect some people and can affect your sleep that night. You know, you're tossing and turning, you know, thinking you're going to miss your alarm every every hour. So you're really not. You might be able to sleep for six hours if you go to bed at 9:30. But how much of those six hours is actually going to be sleep? Because every hour. Forty five minutes, you're getting up kind of in a panic, checking your clock, looking at like, oh, shit, that I miss it. No, I'm fine. Go back to sleep. And that's really not really that good of sleep. So. I think, like I was saying, the sleeping up in. You never know what's going to happen at the Games or in some of these competitions.

Christian Lucero:
So sleeping well up until the night before, you can kind of buy yourself a good amount of sleep and a good amount of kind of banked up of of rest. That way, if you don't get a good night of sleep before that, you don't have the stress. You know, you're like, OK, I'm going to go through this. I know that I've been sleeping well. My body can handle it. And you can kind of tell yourself, you know, you're ready for this. You've slept your brief prep for this. So even if you don't get a good night's sleep that night before you know you can handle this and then you're gonna be recovered, you're gonna be able to nap, to sleep after and to recover and find times. So I think it's all about the mindset. You know, not freaking yourself out about if you don't get too little sleep and kind of overthinking it. Right. I think a lot of people overthink like, oh, if I don't get X amount of hours, I'm screwed or if I don't eat X amount of things, I'm screwed. And yeah, to a certain extent, you have to make sure you're putting the right things in your body. You're getting enough sleep, you're paying attention to that without overthinking it. And and then coming off the other side of like stress and kind of realizing k maybe stressing out about this stuff is going to affect me more as well. So, I mean, there's nothing you can do about it to control that. So you kind of just gotta say fuck it, like going to roll with the punches and trust my prep.

Jason Ackerman:
Are you doing anything regularly for mindset?

Christian Lucero:
No, I am not. I don't. I kind of was raised. By my parents, my dad kind of training me in that mindset stuff. So there's a lot of it that I still use that I kind of don't realize is for that that I was taught at a young age that, you know, my wife, who does use some sports psychologists and headspace and some other meditation apps and some of that other stuff, she's like learning these techniques and some of them I have talked to her about. But some of them she's learning and I'm like, oh, hey, I do that not knowing like what that was. And I think just because, you know, I had been taught that from a younger age growing up that I kind of subconsciously do. One of the ones I do like to do is some breathing work, whether it's I mean, it's not really, you know, quote unquote, mental training. It is, but not like to the to the sense of like a meditation or like a headspace or something like that is. I like to do a breathing work. So Brian Mackenzie and my friend Brian D-AZ, they recently came out with an app called the State App, and I've been playing around with that. And I had kind of known that they were gonna come out with that. So they had kind of given me a first firsthand look at that app. And so I'd been using that and playing with that.

Christian Lucero:
And it's the app, it's a breathing app to kind of utilize the techniques that they had learned through a lot of the Wim Hof stuff and a lot of those breathing, a lot of that science behind the breathing. And, you know, being able to use that for focus, being able to use that for like relaxation and sleep and alertness. All that stuff. So I like to utilize and play with some of that breathing work. And I especially like to use the breathing work when I do an ice bath. So I like to do on my off days are different times during the week. Do the full you know, I submersion where you're up to, you're your neck in ice water working and not really the only way I can get through that and stay in that for extended periods of time is using that breathing work. So it's kind of taught me the importance of that mental state breathing and utilizing the breath and your mind and to get through something like that. I think that can be very useful for Crossfitters when you know you're in a workout that feels like like you when you're in an ice bath, you know, your whole body is freaking out. You can't breathe. Everything's hurting. Everything's telling you to stop. And then being able to overcome that.

Jason Ackerman:
Brian Deah's is a name from the past. I think I met him in like 2008. He's living in Texas, wasn't he?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, yeah. He's back in Texas now.

Jason Ackerman:
And part of the endurance crew and that's cool. The year, you know, a lot of people I'm sure you hear this and I want to make the games and they don't realize, you know, I always make the analogy like I change it to the purple belt. I dont think I should fight Connor McGregor, anytime soon.

Christian Lucero:
Right.

Jason Ackerman:
But some guy of the Crossfit, for two weeks. All of a sudden they want to be at the games competing with the guys. What are some of the things they don't realize you're doing that is allowing you to be at that level that if they knew that, they might decide, OK, this isn't for me?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, well, I think that a lot of I mean, I would never discourage someone from from like going after that goal or having that as a goal or chasing that. I would just if they were serious about it and wanted my advice or wanted some help with it or wanted to see, like you said, what what are some things that I'm doing? It would really be a look at like how basically we've taken any I which I'm sure any games athlete. I'm sure you can speak to this having talked to them and the ones that I know and that I have relationships with. The one thing they don't understand or a lot of people don't understand is how we've taken everything in our life and pretty much simplified it down to. Does this either help towards that goal of. Being at the games, competing at the highest level, fighting for placements and for podium spots at the games, or does this hurt? So if it's if it helps that and is for that goal, we keep it. If it hurts, that isn't for that goal. Dump it. It's out of your life. So to like, simplify and like, really simplify down to the core of it.it's, is this everything we do in our day and every day, every day, everything we do is pretty much broken down into only helping us for that one goal. And if it's not helping us for that one goal, I'm not doing it. And I don't think a lot of athletes, especially the ones I know and that I have relationship with, can attest to that, that that's the way they live their life and that includes relationships, that includes, you know, food, that includes social activities, that includes work, school, like any type of other extracurricular work that they're doing.

Christian Lucero:
And that's pretty to put it as simple as possible. That's that's if you're there, everything they're doing is for that singular goal. And if it's not for that singular goal, it's it's going to be taking away from that goal. So it's it's out.

Jason Ackerman:
And you mentioned earlier you'd be willing to give up a year's suggestion train for the Olympics. You know, it's twenty nineteen. How many years can someone stay at the level you're currently at? I mean, whether you're at the games or not, you're still one of the fittest people in the world. What's what's realistic? I mean, are we going to see. It seems to me like thirty to thirty three is kind of that age where the athletes are. Struggling to maintain their fitness, what is your plan?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, I think that I think that the age isn't so much a a factor as much as people let on or people say, I think it's more so the lifestyle and the monotonous grind of everything being. Like I said, for this particular goal, everything, you know, being meticulously done for that goal and just the mental wear that that can have on a person and the mental that can be tough. You know, you're not going out and taking no vacations. You're not going maybe going out to dinner all the time with friends and family. You're not doing a lot of things that a lot of people enjoy and feel like they're missing out on. So I feel like it's that that feeling of like missing out on life or that feeling of that some people can have like not being able to do some of the things that their friends, their family are doing. Having to say no to a family trip, having to say no to maybe going to, you know, a sibling's graduation or a family member's wedding because, you know, you have this this goal that's kind of you're obsessed with that. You're that own the only thing that your life is is for right now is for this. And it has to be that way. If you want to be the best that you can be at it and be among the best in the world at it, because there are people that are going to do that. And so if you want to be there, you know, that's something you're going to have to do as well. And so I think it's that mental and emotional toll that it can take if you're not careful with that. You know, and feeling that, you know, feeling pressure from family, feeling pressure from a spouse or significant other feeling pressure from society of, you know, if you're a girl or, you know, and you've been doing this to society, telling you all you need to be married with kids at a certain age, you need to have a house and a job.

Christian Lucero:
And 401K at this time, you need to be looking at retirement at this time. And, you know, there's all these pressures and stressors that can weigh on you when you're chasing this that aggressively. And with that much that I think that's the biggest part is, is being able to mentally stay in it, because your body, I think, is capable of a lot, lot more, especially as we we were getting more advanced in our society. There's more technology, there's more aid for recovery, there's more aid for performance now than ever. I think we can our bodies can push well beyond our 30s. I think it's more so the mindset and the social pressures and all that, like weighing on you time, year after year, time of, you know, time after time, it can be the most detrimental to your career. And so I think that's more important than just kind of like an age boundary or an age marker. That's like all you've hit, you know, thirty to thirty three. You know, you're no longer able to do this. I think that's the biggest thing, especially with, you know, being with my wife. You know, she's been on the Olympic track and going after the Olympics for close to 15 years now. So, you know, obviously, she's she's dealt with a lot of a lot of that in her life. You know, having her friends be, you know, married, have kids, you know, years and years and years before she was married. And, you know, all of them pretty much all of them have kids and are looking at their second kids. And, you know, she's still grinding, still in this in this hamster wheel, so to speak, where, you know, she's chasing this goal because, you know, that's what what she's meant to do and what she believes that she, you know, wants to do and is meant to do and is pushing here to do. And I think that's the biggest thing that that has been an issue like kind of weighing on her is is feeling like, OK, when am I going to be out of this? What am I going to be able to move on to kids and some of the other things in life? And even though, you know, she's still hitting PR, she's still getting better, her technique still getting better. Her strength is still getting better. I mean, realistically, looking at the numbers, it's not like you would say, oh, you know, you're declining, you should stop. It's like, no, you're actually continuing to get better at it regardless of where you're at. As far as age, it's it's more so all those other pressures that are telling people to stop or kind of weighing on them.

Jason Ackerman:
Do you have any specific examples of things either you or your wife have said no to in order to further your career?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, I've said no to. Off the top of my head, I've said no to going to my sisters. Who's she? Plays lacrosse at Stanford. So she has had games that have been close to me and I've been in the middle of like a training period for regionals at the Games. And I've had to say, you know, hey, I can't go out and spend, you know, three of, you know, an hour in traffic to get to L.A.. I can't. An hour of traffic back two and a half, three hours at the game. Not not having, you know, going out to eat any of that. I've been I've had to say no to like going to watch her play play sports in college. I've had to say no to going to weddings. I've had to say like family weddings. I've had to say no to going to family vacations where they've all like all my family is gone on a trip to whether it's a cruise through Alaska or a trip to Peru. I've had to say no to that. I've had to say no to. I think those are probably some of the bigger ones. You know, friends, weddings are easy. Those are easy to say no to. But. And then my wife, on the other hand, same thing she's had to say no to, you know, visiting her family back in Florida. She's had to say no to the same family vacations and friend's wedding was and you know, those are the harder ones. Obviously, it's easy to say no to like there's baby showers or like little parties and things that are happening. Those are kind of easier things. And you kind of get used to saying no to those. But, you know, anything with the family is a lot harder. Christmas. You know, go on to visit her for Christmas or Thanksgiving and getting like that pressure from from family that, you know, they want to see you and they miss you and kind of feeling that, you know, you feel bad about it already, say no. And then you have that on top of it's kind of it's pretty hard, but.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, yeah, it's a being. A games level or an Olympian is not for everybody. You have to be right to sacrifice. How with the changes to the games. How has it impacted the people at your level? Like these games athletes did, right? Is it impactful or is it just training as usual?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, I think it's super impactful, I think. There's there's a few that will have any change. They'll continue to. But I think at any level, whether you're, you know, the guy that's winning the games, the girl that's winning the games or you're somebody that's know top 10, top 20, top 30, I think that it's it's going to affect every level of games, athlete and every tier and regardless of where you're at. And I think for the most part, the biggest effect was you kind of had a set idea of what how your year was gonna be. Right. It was always the open in the regionals into the games. And you could count on those three things regardless of if you did some extra curricular competitions like what a Wodpalooza or Dubai as kind of tune-ups. You always knew that these were the most important pieces of my season, open regionals games. And so now with them removing the regionals and and having just the open as the national championship qualifier and then all the sanctionable events kind of serving as a quote unquote regional style events, it kind of opens up your your year. So I think it almost is more beneficial for games athletes. They can qualify either through the open as a national champion, which there's tons of of of games athletes that are from different countries and and have the possibility of doing that. And then there are all the sanctionable events that are all over the world. You know, you have them in China, Italy.

Christian Lucero:
Dubai, I mean, any every every corner of the world, there's sanctionable events Ireland popping up. You know, the U.K., you know, there was one in Africa. So there's all of these sexual events popping up that can. That are throughout the year different times. So you can kind of you can you have multiple shots to qualify for the games. I think it gives you multiple, multiple opportunities. And if if you mess up on one in the past, say you had a bad regionals or a bad regional event or bad two events, you know, that kind of could kind of screw your whole season of being at the games and competing for a spot there. And now, you know, say you mess up in one of the open workouts and you didn't get your national champion qualification or something happened through the open. You have all these other opportunities and sanctionable events that you can show up at and earn your spot. And you can go to multiple you can go to as many as you want. So I think it it does it kind of opens the door for a lot of athletes and for a lot of opportunities to not only earn that spot to the games and compete at the games, but also those are opportunities to get paid by sponsors, you know, to show have good showings for sponsors and to earn more money for sponsors. And so I think in a. At first, a lot of people were mad and, you know, I think it's more so a lot of the Americans were mad because, you know, there's only one national championship spot for America. There's a lot of games athletes in America, and that means that they would have to travel and go to these sanctioned events. And I think it's more so out of fear and not knowing. And that changed like, oh, I have to win an event. I have to. You know, I've never won anything in my life. I've always come here, here and here. How am I gonna do this? I'm screwed. Instead of kind of looking at the opportunity of like there's all of these national champions that are going to be going. You know, you have us pop possibilities there. And then also there's a ton of sanctionable events that that can be money. Earner is not only for a prize, not only feel like purses, but also for sponsorships and those opportunities. And you can almost create your own kind of circuit and choose which events you want to go to and be a part of and kind of create your own season based on your schedule and what you have going on in your life. You don't have to base your life around this March or February or March, June, regional August games schedule. You know, you have a little bit more freedom to create your own season, essentially.

Jason Ackerman:
So what do you anticipate doing for the twenty twenty season? Do you already have your ideas for this santinal event you'll compete?

Christian Lucero:
No. I mean, I haven't really decided on any. Last time I competed in Dubai, I love Dubai, so I'll definitely be at that one again. And then I think it all it it'll kind of be just dependent on the ones that are popping up where it looks like the best. You know, you have to be smart about it. You have to be like, look at now because the national champions are qualifying. You know, if you're in a sanctionable event that has multiple national champions in it that are already qualified. You don't necessarily have to win that event. You just have to be the best person that hasn't qualified a spot yet. So I think it's it presents a whole nother level of strategy and a whole nother level of kind of chess maneuvering, which is cool. And as an added part to to the Crossfit, Games experience and Crossfit, Games Road that has previously not been there. So yeah, I haven't. I know. I'll definitely do Dubai again. I'll definitely I'll definitely do. I think my wife's wanted to visit Italy for a long time. She's Italian, so I'll probably be at the Italian showdown. I would imagine.

Jason Ackerman:
She's Italian. I assume you're Italian?

Christian Lucero:
No, I'm more Spanish. And like half my family's real Spanish, like Basque Spain. That European area. And then the other the other part is more Latin American, the Colombian and Mexican kind of native Native American down in that area.

Jason Ackerman:
Just figured the value of the island name, you know.

Christian Lucero:
That's why that's why people say Lucero, that it's Italian. Yeah, that's what it is. All right.

Christian Lucero:
She's a she's Sicilian and Italian.

Jason Ackerman:
We kind of keep her happy after Toyko Italy.

Christian Lucero:
Yeah. Yeah, exactly.

Jason Ackerman:
I'm gonna let you get back to training. But one thing I like to ask everybody on the show is, do you have any books that you recommend people check out?

Christian Lucero:
Game of Thrones.

Jason Ackerman:
Did you read the book?

Christian Lucero:
No. I just watched this TV show. I don't read. I don't read a lot of books. I more listen to, like, podcasts. And if I if I do read books, it's in it's in like small spurts.

Jason Ackerman:
So your sister's the smart one. Yeah. The Asian, you mentioned Stanford and then your parents are like Christian fit so that's good.

Christian Lucero:
Yeah. So I leave the books to her and I do the audio books on tape and the TV shows.

Jason Ackerman:
The TV. Well, you gotta chill out as an angel out after Giang game of there.

Christian Lucero:
Exactly. Yeah. I don't know if you could call watching Game of Thrones chilling out, but I don't like anxiety and stress.

Jason Ackerman:
I've never seen it. But I'm here and know all my buddies right now talking about the episodes that are going on. It's not making me want to watch it. You want to give a shout out to any of your sponsors before we help off thid?

Christian Lucero:
Yeah, I actually going back I just remembered you asked about the mental prep and I just started working with a sponsor called Brain CO. That they're out of Harvard. Another another group of smart people that I know. And they developed a wearable head unit that picks up on your alpha waves and beta waves. So can give you instant feedback on pretty much where your brain activity is. So if you're going through a Headspace app or you're going through meditative practices or you're going through, you know, just breathing work or anything, you can put this wearable head unit on and it'll give you a reading of where your where your waves are at. So if you're in a focused mental state or if you're in a more relaxed, decompressed mental state. So I've been using that to help almost psych. Show me where, you know, because a lot of times we do the breathing, we do the meditative stuff and you feel something, you feel like, okay, I feel like I'm more calm or I feel like I'm more focused. But where am I actually? And so this is a cool thing that they've developed with their robotics or with their their wearable that they've used in the education field and with a lot of schools to be able to see engagement in classrooms.

Christian Lucero:
And they're kind of focusing it right now for fitness and they're bringing out a fitness app as well as programs. So you can kind of utilize that and utilize some of their programs on there to track where you're at, to see where you whether you're focused, you're relax and you can they have some games and and activities on there that will only let you progress through them in and complete them if you're in a certain state. So you can really feel where you're focused, as you can see where it's at and you can see like for me, if I'm just looking at something and trying to focus my my levels lower, if I'm like doing multiple things and multitasking. That's when my focus increases. So you can kind of see visually what kind of learner you are and go through those. I've been using that and they have a whole other department that's a robotics department that is developing wearable and wearable. Pruss That prosthetics for amputees that can be controlled with the same similar technology of that muscle mind connection. And so they can actually have a fully functioning robotic hand. And so they're doing some pretty cool stuff in that that company is called Brain Co. But yeah, that's another mental mental thing.

Christian Lucero:
I definitely check them out and everyone can find you. And yet, John V. Luce, I should. Yeah. Yeah. Oh, you see.

Jason Ackerman:
And what was your wife on Instagram?

Christian Lucero:
Hers is Jessica Sarah 9. That's on Instagram and Twitter. And so. Yeah. So, yeah, we're plugging away, doing our thing, chasing goals, you know, hunting that greatness, as they say.

Jason Ackerman:
That's hunting that greatness. I hope to see you. Back at the 2020 Games that, you know, you and I talked.

Christian Lucero:
I met you when you were doing the ring, you were doing ring a handstand push ups. Yeah. One of the hardest moments to judge and I hope to judge you again in twenty twenty on the same movement. So, yeah. Let's see what else. Um, and especially just getting ready for Tokyo.

Jason Ackerman:
So hope to see there'd be quite a fit couple ran Olympian and a games athletes. Best of luck to both of you. Thank you for being on.

Christian Lucero:
Thank you for having me out, man. I appreciate it.

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