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112. Jeremy Augusta | Barbell Jobs

112. Jeremy Augusta | Barbell Jobs

On today episode Fern sits down with Jeremy Augusta,  Barbell Jobs creator. Jeremy saw that there was no means for coaches to network and look for work in the CrossFit/micro gym space. They discuss job hunting, gym purchases, resumes and what coaches should be doing to make themselves more desirable on paper when looking for job opportunities. Also what affiliate owners need to be doing when looking for coaches, and why it’s not always best to bring in coaches within your community. This is episode is about forcing on ensuring that you can make a professional career out of this, but it does start at you looking at it as a profession first. 

Timestamps:
(5:58) Not turning members into coaches
(13:51) Resumes are still a thing and you should have one.
(18:13) Payment
(20:37) The biggest mistakes being made on resumes.
(25:59) How long does it take to fill a job post?
(27:48) Really beneficial skills.
(31:35) Selling/buying a gym
(49:24) Advice for Employer 

Social media: 

https://www.barbelljobs.com/

Instagram: @barbelljobs

Book: 

Built to Sell: Creating a Business That Can Thrive Without You – John Warrillow 

We value your feedback. After listening, please hit me up with any questions, comments, or thoughts on how we can make this show even better, and if you enjoyed it, please share it!

Instagram; @besthouroftheirday

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Check out our website – besthouroftheirday.com – to learn more about our private coaches development group.

Barbell Jobs.mp4 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

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Fern:
Everybody, welcome back to the best hour of their day podcast. Jason Fernandez here with what I consider I’ve actually been looking forward to this to this interview because I don’t think this is something that is talked about a lot. I’m here with Jeremy Augusta. Jeremy Augusta runs and he’s the founder of Barbell Jobs. And if you haven’t seen that, it is essentially just a kind of a head hunting platform, I guess, like I guess on this on the regular side, this would be like zipper cuter, kind of like where you can submit a job.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah, it’s a it’s a dedicated job board for people like you and me.

Fern:
Yeah. So for fitness professionals. And the reason I wanted to bring Jeremy on the show is because I think that this topic and the idea of a resumé is not something that’s on a lot of people’s minds in the Crossfit, community. But before we get into that, just give you a brief intro here, Jeremy. So Jeremy Prior Army owns a Burton County Strength Club as well, as well as American Strength Club and did four years in the Army, six years in the Coast Guard, and then now is just doing fitness like the rest of us.

Jeremy Augusta:
It lift him heavy shit in hustlin, make a dollar cool, so I mean, let’s just dive right in.

Fern:
So how did how did barbell jobs come about, actually. First, tell everybody what it is.

Jeremy Augusta:
All right. Well, barbell jobs dot com is a job board for macro gyms, for Crossfit, affiliates and the fitness industry in general. 90 percent of all the job postings we have, about three hundred and forty right now are all Crossfit, gyms.

Fern:
Ok. So how did this come about, like how does one decide, like, hey, I’m just going to make a job board because that’s a pretty outside the box like most people are like. I’m going to do programming, I’m going to do supplements. And you’re like, now I’m going to create a job board.

Jeremy Augusta:
Well, I was open my first location and it was doing really well. And so I thought, like a lot of people think at that point that, well, I need to open a second one. That’s I make more money. So I started to. I had everything in place to open a second facility and another and another city, I had funding for the equipment, I had the location. What I didn’t have was someone to run it this time. I was coach in eight, nine classes a day, so I obviously couldn’t go run it.

Fern:
That a lot of Classes dude. That’s a lot of classes.

Jeremy Augusta:
It is a lot of classes. That was a lot of hassle back then. So I couldn’t run it and I figured I probably wouldn’t be too hard to find someone to give a job to. Couldn’t find no members who would want to do it because I was in the mind frame of great coaches remembers back to them, which now I know is not the correct way to do things, but. So I start Posten and the affiliate owners group and Crossfit, competition groups. Anything I could find trying to find? Coaches didn’t damn one. And I start getting pissed off thinking, well, how am I gonna open this facility if there is no centralized way to find a coach? And being the entrepreneur I am, I realize if I’m having this issue, everyone else has to be having this issue as well.

Fern:
Now, in this time, are you getting interviews with just candidates that you don’t like or you’re just not getting anything?

Jeremy Augusta:
Nobody. Nobody.

Fern:
OK.

Jeremy Augusta:
Nothing. Nothing. I had one guy from my Colorado messaged me and he wanted me to pay for his move. And now it’s like, how would like your job? Please send me 8 thousand dollars to move there.

Fern:
Ok. And then. So when did you got when did you actually start barbell jobs? When did that start?

Jeremy Augusta:
Started just over two years ago. I looked for probably six months trying to find a coach. And I started thinking about there’s gonna be a better way. Someone’s gotta be doing this somewhere. And it just didn’t happen. Wasn’t a thing. So I decided that I would make it myself, create a barbell, jobs and which I have no Experience with programming on computers or anything of that, so that was a good. A good opportunity to self learn some things, you know.

Jeremy Augusta:
And I just rolled with it. I put it out there and I started marketing it messaging. Every time I saw someone say, I’m looking for a coach, I’d get a hold of them and say, listen, I can help you with this. I know your life sucks trying to figure this out. I’ve done the work. I can do the work and it’s grown from there.

Fern:
Do you know you know roughly how many? Coaches you’ve placed since you started.

Jeremy Augusta:
I don’t have information on the coaches. I’ve placed because to get that information, I rely on the gym owner to come back and voluntarily give the information.

Fern:
Got it.

Jeremy Augusta:
Which to have them go back, log in a system, fill out a survey just isn’t happening. But I do know that I have a 60 percent rate of people who have posted jobs to become returning customers for when they would need to post more jobs.

Fern:
That’s cool. So it sounds like you might need to get a little bit more on the metric so you can see like what’s the length of employment with those employers, all stuff. Yeah, I can imagine being a gym owner myself at some point or just like I’m not doing that likeI don’t have time for that.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. Okay. Eventually I’ll figure out a better way for that. Yeah. But right now I just gotta rely on the gym owner to decide. I’ve got time. I should go back and fill out the survey.

Fern:
Cool. So you brought up something that was interesting and this is really kind of this could we could go for a while on this. So you said something that was very contrary to what probably everybody on that we had on the show is said, which I’m totally open to and don’t even necessarily disagree with you on, which is the internal versus external hire and the vast majority of the Crossfit, community. We’re romantic about our own stuff like, you know, almost to a fault where, you know, like all we just want to take it from inside and the members. And the longer I do this, I do think there is the opportunity to do both. But I think people are so resistant to taking people externally. And I don’t know that that’s necessarily a good thing.

Jeremy Augusta:
Well, the issue is so let’s say you’ve been working out with someone for three or four years doing squats next, don’t doing fran next to them. You know this person intimately. He’s your buddy. You drink at his house. So now all the sudden, he’s a coach. Is he gonna command the same kind of respect for you and someone that is a professional coach who is brought in based on their qualifications? It’s not going to happen. I mean, sometimes they can, but it’s really not the case anymore, especially for people who if you have a hobby gym and you just you’re working your ass off and you just need someone to cover a couple of classes. That’s one thing. But if you’re a professional gym owner, if this is your livelihood, if you want to have professional coaches, you’re not going to get them from the people. Who are you doing that or the people who are already in your gym? And most of those people have jobs anyway. Now, on barbell jobs, we have well over a thousand profiles of professional coaches, people who their only job. The only thing they want to do with their life is coach, not open a gym and be your competition, not work part time. Well, there was a lot of those, but these are people who. This is what this is their livelihood. This is their profession. And so for someone who does that. To be comparable to someone who works out three or four times a week, an hour a day with their buddies and then drinks after. It’s not the same thing.

Fern:
No, I’ve I’ve. I agree with you and I couldn’t agree with you more. The I’ve always told people that the best gyms have coaches who that’s all they do now. And again, whether whether they get paid to do that or not, like there is a ton of different scenarios out there, and most of which I disagree with is that there’s a lot of really good on paid coaches out there. That’s a separate conversation. But I agree, if you’re going to have the best coaches, you’re gonna have the best service. And forget coaching, right? Best customer service. Best business. Like you have to have people there who it is their job to show up at whatever time that is at 7:00 in the morning and work until 7:00 p.m. at night. And I just don’t know. There is a way to kind of break through and have a thriving business without that.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. I mean, if your build some that’s going to last long after you. You got to have people who hone their craft. Not people who want a discount on their membership. There’s a big difference in the quality that you get.

Fern:
Yeah, it also it also can present, in my experience, some leadership hurdles that you’re going to have to navigate. So, you know, luckily I was kind of force-fed leadership as as as I’m sure you were in the military. But even sometimes then you’re gonna come up against some scenarios that you’re not probably equipped for, which is like my best friend now works for me. And that’s going to create some problems. You know, like we had Chris Spealler + Doug Zakaras on the show. That show was on yesterday. This will proably air in a week or so. But they’re probably one of the. The anomalies where they’ve been friends for eleven years. Doug works for Chris, but that’s not the norm. I’ve seen a lot of relationships, both, you know, significant others and friendships broken up by employment scenarios.

Jeremy Augusta:
Well, even going back to the military to give a really good example, when I was in the Coast Guard, I was a E-4. We had our E-4 Mafia. We ran around, we allies, our drinking buddies. One of the guys, maybe five. And Alison, he thinks he’s big shit and he’s, you know, telling us what to do. And everyone’s are just looking at him laughing at him orders because listen, we remember seeing you naked on a bar dancing. Tell me to do shit.

Fern:
That allegedly happened. Everybody, guys in the army don’t do that.

Jeremy Augusta:
Now, that the coast grand.

Fern:
What are those things like? Yeah, that definitely has to be that depth if if you’re going to do that. It has to be approached very carefully. And it has in one of the biggest mistakes that I see is because it’s a casual relationship. The agreement is very casual as well.

Fern:
So what I want to talk about a little bit is. So you’ve seen a ton of applications come through, but what are some of the pros that you’ve seen from people that are hiring externally? So, so literally I was on a phone call yesterday at an affiliate, a guy who’s actually a head coach at an affiliate who is thinking about buying the affiliate out. But he was calling me, asking me about who he was. He was super afraid of doing an external hire.

Fern:
And my answer was like, Hey, Hire, dude. And if you don’t like him firing, it’s so much easier to get rid of somebody that’s not your friend.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. I mean, he cant fire your, you know, your drinking buddy or the guy that you barbecue with. Or I mean, so much because in your screw, your friendship. Yeah.

Fern:
So is do you see people starting to open up more to that? Like I’m just not in that world of of seeing what other affiliates owner and who’s hiring where. I mean I’m a little bit but you probably see what. Way more of it than I do.

Jeremy Augusta:
Well you know, you gave me an example. I have the receipt. I’m looking at my phone real quick. Eighty two applications today. For a position that I’m helping a affiliate owner, fill

Fern:
For one position?

Jeremy Augusta:
One position.

Fern:
Damn, that’s a lot. That is a lot, and 50 percent of these at least are applying for these positions, have not follow the instructions on the job posting. So they’re not even getting considered. They’re not getting a message back. They’re being deleted.

Fern:
Ok. So which leads me to my next thing. So if you talk to any of my staff, I am notorious for kind of hounding them about the fact that a resumé is still a thing.

Jeremy Augusta:
Absolutely.

Fern:
So this goes into what you just talked about. What is it? What are employers looking for? And then the second question to that is people who are applying jobs. What should they be doing when they apply for jobs?

Jeremy Augusta:
All right. So obviously, resumé is important. But when you’re sitting here like I am, who’s looking through over 80? Applications resumes tend to bleed together, especially in our industry, because the big certifications are always Crossfit, ones.

Fern:
Yeah.

Jeremy Augusta:
What really stands out? Well, one, you need to have a well presented resumé. But the difference maker that is really gonna determine if you get a job or not, or at least the interview is your cover letter. The cover letter is the most important factor because that’s the first thing that they see. It’s going to be generic and they’re going to discard it or you’re going to look at it and see that this person has been to the gym website. They have looked at what the core values of that gym are. They’ve explained how they fit into this community and can be an asset to this community. And then those are the people who get the jobs, because that shows that people aren’t just clicking apply. It shows that they’re seeing something take an interest, going to the website, doing their homework before they put in the application,.

Fern:
Which for a lot of people you would think would be a no brainer. But.

Jeremy Augusta:
You think.

Fern:
You would think. But it’s not like I can’t over the years have had tons of people come to me and say, I want to coach. And I’m like, OK, well. Like, what’s your schedule like? They’re like, well. You know, I work and then it it gets down to the point like they can’t really coach. It’s just like it’s a good thought, which haven’t put any thought into actually what this entails, what it is that we’re looking for. So when I when I have when I get on the phone with people, the first thing I tell them and I’m pretty candid about it is like this has to be valuable for me and I need you to understand that. And I don’t think a lot of coaches approach it from that standpoint of like, how can I be valuable to you?

Jeremy Augusta:
So you’re actually right. I’ve done quite a few articles on this and blog posts. You’re not. The owner isn’t hiring a person, they’re either hiring an asset or a liability.

Fern:
Correct.

Jeremy Augusta:
So they need to hire someone who is going to elevate the facility as a whole. And they’ve got to have certain skills when they have to know how to sell, whether they sell or not. You’re constantly selling no matter what you do in life. And that’s a skill that you have to have. If you want to do if you want to be a coach, you want to make real money and do personnel training to make to make that money. You have to sell yourself on the personal train to the people for the personal training.

Jeremy Augusta:
You have to sell the facility to people that you know, you have to sell the way you coach to people. So everything is about sales. If someone has those those skills, they’re coming on as an asset. They’re going to be important. They’re going to have a great career. They’re going to progress throughout the industry, reach great heights. If they don’t have certain skills, they just want to coach and nothing else. They’re a liability and nobody needs a liability.

Fern:
Yeah. And I think that’s the other thing that people miss is that, like, they just want people want to make whatever money. And we can talk about salaries in a minute, but they want to make 40 grand to coach 20 classes a month. And I’m like, yeah. That’s not a thing. But that is just not a thing at all. Like you’re gonna have to do a lot of other things. And I think people forget how much. So, for instance, I have a friend who owns a traditional kind of more like primarily what they do is it is personal training. And she owns this thing. And she does anywhere between ten to twelve personal training sessions a day.

Jeremy Augusta:
Wow.

Fern:
Yeah. She hustles, though, like now she’s a stud. Well, that’s what she told me. She, like, people want to come in and they think personal training is great, but they don’t want to work. They’re not going to get up at 4:30 and they’re not going to book 10 clients in one day. And so they don’t last. It’s hard.

Jeremy Augusta:
That’s. That’s that’s really impressive. Yeah.

Fern:
She’s an outlier, but I think even if you were to do like just a slightly milder version of that, which is like, hey, if you want to work and earn a living, you’re gonna have to work to earn a living. Yeah. You know, and I think people just miss under stand like what the coaching life is like. And. And you can tell me what you think. But I think people misunderstand it because they’re in the gym for two hours a day. And they because they’re like, all this is amazing. I could do this to you. I was here for fifteen hours today. You did? This is all you saw of the 15 hours that I did. So what what in your in your experience, like on average, what are people hiring full time coaches for?

Jeremy Augusta:
You mean the reason or the payments?

Fern:
Uhh payment?

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah, that is a very loaded question because the I recently and I’ve got an article on Barbella Jobs dot com. I’ve broken paid down based off the different regions of the country and metro areas. OK. There’s a huge difference from. You know, the black Kansas City, which I’m near to, you know, 20 miles out of it.

Fern:
OK.

Jeremy Augusta:
So that’s it’s kind of hard to say what they’re hiring for. OK. Average pay for a career. Crossfit, coach is you must pull it up on my phone, I can tell you.

Fern:
Yeah, go ahead. I’m just curious because. You know, I’m always thinking about hiring and doing stuff like that. And there’s a million different ways to do that. But it also depends on from a business standpoint, like what can you afford?

Jeremy Augusta:
Well, let’s use you for an example. Where are you located?

Fern:
Virginia Beach.

Jeremy Augusta:
Me one second to pull this up and I’ll give you the information for your area. We can get specific.

Jeremy Augusta:
Sorry, it’s taken me a second.

Fern:
No, you’re good. Here you are.

Jeremy Augusta:
$18 per class coached for the your general area, not your city or your state. But in that part of the country.

Fern:
Ok. And what does that what part of the country does that entail? It’s like Mid – Atlantic,.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah.

Fern:
OK. So 18 bucks an hour. But that’s just that’s actually coaching ours, right?

Jeremy Augusta:
Yes.

Fern:
And then so, you know,.

Jeremy Augusta:
That doesn’t count. Admin work, personal training.

Fern:
OK.

Jeremy Augusta:
You know, this is based off of what the jobs are posted on barbell jobs.

Fern:
Got it.

Jeremy Augusta:
And their coaches pay.

Fern:
Right. So second question with regard to that is like waters outside of the cover letter, like just not having a cover letter or not or just kind of not doing any homework. What are some of the biggest mistakes people make with regard to resume?.

Jeremy Augusta:
Not important information being on there. So, like, saw one today, someone’s applying for a ownership position that we have where someone is selling their gym and 90% their resumé was about the fast food work they did when they were kids, kid. It’s not pertinent information if it doesn’t real relate directly to the job and how you can excel at it. It known as me.

Fern:
Got it.

Jeremy Augusta:
Not for people like me and you who were in the military. We don’t need to put on that. We were female certified or whatever. You know,.

Fern:
I had to take a good class on that. So for somebody to basically teach me how to decipher things that I did in the military. To rephrase them so that they were relevant to jobs that I would potentially apply for.

Jeremy Augusta:
I do that with the veterans all the time for free. So if I see someone post a profile, I look at every profile I’ve got post that gets posts on and keeps them in the man. And whenever I see that, they check were a veteran and I look over their profile and if it looks like crap, I just call them. Listen this. Got it. No one cares, I took you eight years to get your first good contract.

Fern:
If you’ve been around here, that’s not that good anyway.

Jeremy Augusta:
You’re had fun getting there.

Fern:
That’s right. That’s right. Yeah. You had a good time. The the other thing that I that I’m curious about is like, do gym owners reach out to you to potentially get advice about what they should be hiring for?

Jeremy Augusta:
Not real often. A lot of gym owners are on their post, are simply for they need to have extra coaches. But as this progresses and more and more gym owners are learning the benefit of hiring professional coaches, I am starting to get some calls where people ask, well, these are the admin duties that go along with it. Why should I actually pay this person perhaps that..

Fern:
Got it, And then are your. But you’re not. So for me, like so I’m I’m think about it from my standpoint, it’s like usually I have coaches, but the first thing I kind of outsourced was a little bit of coaching. But then it was a lot more admin work. So it was like social media skills. And because I could coach and for a while I’m thinking about like the. I’m thinking about the typical lifespan of an affiliate owner. So first you do everything and you’re generally the best coach. So it’s usually best for you to be on the floor at the beginning. So then what you probably should do is you probably should hire out for admen skills that you either can’t do due to time constraints or just don’t want to do like scheduling, payroll, cleaning, stuff like that. Are people do you see more people looking for that these days or it just all coaching?

Jeremy Augusta:
It’s mostly coaching. It’s mostly a coaching and management roles. People aren’t posting too much about the other roles yet, which hopefully they will start to because it can be a giant benefit forum.

Fern:
Yeah, it’s huge. If you’re if you have multiple skill sets, then you then you can almost. I wouldn’t say you could write your own check, but if you can do if you can where a lot of hats in the gym again going back to. I’m thinking about this selfishly. So if somebody wanted a job at my gyms, you need to be able to do a lot of things like you need to be able to work on spreadsheets, you need to be able to get on the phone and make sales calls. You need to be able to do sales consults. You need to be able to do all of that stuff. That might not be your primary role, but if I can plug you in any one of those spots when I need to. On a whim, because something comes up, then you’re an asset to the team.

Jeremy Augusta:
Well, I’m working with some of the software vendors in our space. We’re creating super user certifications. Ok. So like to give push press a plug for coaches. They’re creating a super user certification for Crossfit, coaches. Push press.

Fern:
OK.

Jeremy Augusta:
That way when someone like you who has all these other issues that they want them to do. You can look on their resumé or ethnic profiling, barbell jobs and see that if your billing platform or your client management platform is press press, here’s someone who’s invested time and energy to become intimately familiar with that software program.

Fern:
I mean, it would be a huge benefit because, you know, you don’t want to. You don’t. If somebody is good on what to fi, but maybe there you use Zen planter, that can be a huge transition and could be a massive pain point for you.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. So and that’s why I reach out to these different software vendors, because we’re exactly like you said, if you got someone coming into your facility, you don’t know what they use and what you know, they may have other experience in the world on Waterfind or Zen planner. But if you use push press, you can look through and you can find someone who is intimately familiar with that software. It is better for any.

Fern:
It’s a hundred percent. It would make your life easier from your standpoint. OK. And then typically, how long how long do jobs stay on the job board? Like how long? Somebody please post a job and you have applications like are you or are you feeling those pretty quick? I mean, it sounds like you have no shortage of applicants.

Jeremy Augusta:
Not now. There’s plenty about applicats and I been a ton of money on marketing. So coaches see that the jobs are there’s like if you if you were to post a job, it’s going to be marketed on Facebook. Up to 20 Facebook groups, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Google, jobs picks it up and job alerts. And on top of that, if you spend eighty five dollars, supposed a job, a large chunk of that’s gone actually into social media marketing for your position in your local area.

Fern:
Got it. OK.

Jeremy Augusta:
So they get applications pretty quick depending on where they are geographically. So the good the job posting is for 30 day or three months.

Fern:
OK,.

Jeremy Augusta:
And most a lot of gyms are always looking for coaches. So they may fill a position in the first week or two, but they tend to leave them up.

Fern:
Oh in the event that that one doesn’t work out.

Jeremy Augusta:
Well, a lot of gyms just always looking for good coaches. So if you are in that first stage, you’re trying to break out of it where you’re doing everything. You can put a job posting up, one job posting and you’re looking for five coaches. You post one, you know, one posting and you leave it up for three months to get as many as you can.

Fern:
That’s fair. So for somebody who what are some things that you are like absolute mos, if you’re like looking for a job coaching at a Crossfit, gym, when you’re a when you’re putting this resume out, like what are some of the like the just real shit hot applicants that you’ve seen,.

Jeremy Augusta:
People are content creation skills. Oh, you’re good at creating content. You’re gonna be all right in your own paycheck right now.

Fern:
I would absolutely agree with that. But that’s not something I would have thought of. But I. Yes.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. I mean, because I mean, think about how much do we invest in marketing our facilities across different platforms. You know, making our YouTube videos, making those cool Instagram posts that get someone to click on the Link bio to go to the gym Web site and get someone in. I mean,.

Fern:
Those jobs typically I’m imagining those have to be worth a little bit more.

Jeremy Augusta:
Those are typically a head coach position or a GM manager position.

Fern:
Got it.

Jeremy Augusta:
But if you have the skills to create content, you can be a shitty coach. Still make a lot of money.

Fern:
Well, I mean, so the way I would like to describe that is like that is that skill set, if you’re good at is massively R-N.Y. Positive. So like you can create content and know how to do actual marketing, which is which is the skill of putting content in front of people’s eyeballs, not necessarily just creating content, but like understanding how Facebook ads work and all of that stuff that has massive implications on the bottom line. Like you can’t.

Jeremy Augusta:
Absolutely .

Fern:
You can just print money for a gym owner if that’s a really good skill set for you. Well, I don’t go out at all like you can just run social media. Well, yeah. I’ve got a guy who has degrees in marketing. But he wants to work for Crossfit, Gym, so he’s getting his L-1 for his secondary role to be as a coach so he can focus on what he’s really good at, which is marketing for the gyms.

Fern:
You know, out imagine that way, he’s just a filler coach. So he’s primarily doing social media stuff and he just backfilling something probably like fifteen to twenty twenty hours a month. Yeah. That’s a good backfill number, right. If you’re just somebody who just kind of like plug and play 20 is a pretty sweet number because that means you’re probably filling in some gaps. There is some pain points for people.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. I mean you can make a gym owner money, make your career, you know, further on your career. And when a coach needs some time off, just go and coach for.

Fern:
And then on this job, like how much? Are you just the connector or is there some kind of back and forth in there like it? Are there are there negotiations happening like within barbell jobs or do you just do the handoff and then you’re done?

Jeremy Augusta:
Typically, what happens mostly is they post the position and I’m out of the loop. But we also have a headhunting service, which the gyms I’m trying to help sell right now. They took advantage of that. And so what they did with that is I found the people for them, like I’m working on a home and spend my day today working for one gym in Houston. We’re doing phone interviews Friday. We’ve got over 100 applications for his position. Which is, you know, taken over the positions. Basically it’s an entrepreneur who has too much on his plate and someone’s got to come off. But he loves his gym. So I’m doing all the screening for this one. We’ve got over 100 applications and this has only been on the Web site since Saturday.

Fern:
OK,.

Jeremy Augusta:
So for him, I’m going through all these individually. I’m doing two rounds of interviews and then I’m gonna be presenting him with the five best candidates for him to interview. So instead of him spinning, you know, I’m worth at least eight hours a day on this. He invested a little bit of money and he doesn’t have to do it until the very end.

Fern:
At some point. That’s the smart thing, is what you should be doing. The so is, is he just removing himself as kind of a head coach or is he selling his business?

Jeremy Augusta:
So he’s selling his business. And the way this is really interesting and a lot of people I’ve been talking to, actually everyone that I’ve talked to and suggested this to are going this route. So we are setting people up. And in his case, specifically. He is an entrepreneur, he has too much on his plate. He’s not a coach.

Fern:
He didn’t coach at all.

Jeremy Augusta:
Well, he doesn’t enjoy it.

Fern:
Got it.

Jeremy Augusta:
Like business.

Fern:
Understood.

Jeremy Augusta:
And so he wants to focus on other businesses. He’s got to get something off his plate. It’s this gym. And he’s like, well, how sell for. And we discussed that. But instead of a cash up front, what we’re doing is there’s going to be a one year transition for whoever steps in this role. And during this transition, this person is going to be working with a business mentor, whether it’s when Chris Cooper, guys or stewards, whoever will figure it out based off of personalities.

Fern:
Okay.

Jeremy Augusta:
They’re a dick, then we’re going with Stewart. If they’re nice guy, were calling Chris, you laughed. But, you know, it’s that’s how it needs to work.

Fern:
I mean, I get it. I like ideas. Like, that’s why that’s why I laughed when you said it.

Jeremy Augusta:
So and during this year, there’s gonna be certain milestones that this coach has to achieve. So two months in working with their mentor, they have to say, for an example, they have to increase revenue by 5 percent.

Jeremy Augusta:
Once they do that, they take 10 percent ownership. At that point, then, you know, a month or two months later, they have another milestone that their mentor has worked with them to knock off. And then they take another 10, 20 percent ownership until the very end when they get 100 percent ownership. And at that point, there will be a payment made over the course of X amount time, a small payment of the money to the gym owner for the sale price or to the current owner of the sell price.

Jeremy Augusta:
A lot of coaches don’t know who want to be gym owners, don’t have 80, 200 grand, whatever it is to put up.

Fern:
I mean, shit, even people who want to be gym owners, right? I mean, that’s your money.

Jeremy Augusta:
So and this is the way that works out well for everybody. So if we bring someone in and they keep missing their milestones, then it’s good in the contract. Well, you tried, thanks for coming. You’re leaving. And now we move on to someone else.

Fern:
That actually brings up a good point, because I’ve had this conversation.So I’ve done an acquisition and I’ve had people and I’ve talked to a lot of people about acquisitions of other gyms. I didn’t know that was something you guys did. But it does bring up a good point and I’ve probably on probably intimately familiar with. At least 20 sales and the vast majority of. I would give you a ballpark number. You can tell me whether you agree. If it was sold for 50k or less, it’s not actual sale of a business. In my opinion, it’s a sale of assets. I just bought your equipment and I assume your liabilities and stuff like that. So when people say they sold the business, I don’t know that that’s technically true. And the other one is when you look at the number and somebody says that they just wanted to get out of the business. They were just tired. I’m like, you’re what you just said is you’re going out of business, which is what it is. I’m not. That’s not me poking. That’s not me poking anybody in the in the eye. That’s just me simply kind of pulling back the curtain. For people who are going to run a business that like that is a real thing. Like you did not sell a business. You sold all of your stuff because it was going under a lot of times. So and that number is about 50k. You sell the 50k you just sold. You just do that. Anything higher than that? It was probably something was profitable. But what I thought was interesting and I learned this from a business mentor of mine who has nothing to do with fitness.

Fern:
They were just talking about acquisitions and and just M&A in general. And what he talked what he was kind of expressing to me was kind of what the process is for the acquisition. And he said, listen, he goes from both people want to win here, but you can tee this up where both people can win them. The seller generally wants a number, right. So in the end, he put it in terms of like kind of like like real estate. It’s like the seller really wants a very specific number. The buyer has a little bit more wiggle room in that number. But what the buyer wants is terms. They want the terms to work out in their favor. And that’s what I was trying to tell somebody recently. Listen, first, you have to agree of like, can you guys even get remotely close to the same number that you’re that you’re both thinking? And that should be done, in my opinion, by third party. Who’s going to do a valuation on the business? But from there then it’s kind of in my opinion, I think it’s in the buyers court, because once you’ve kind of given the seller the number that they want. Now, in my opinion, you kind of have some leverage there to create terms that are in your best interests. Whether it’s over five years or six years, you do percentage out all that stuff. But I think people are just like, what’s the number? What’s the number like?

Fern:
Well, there’s a lot of wiggle room here. Like you can have maybe a little bit higher number on terms that work far better for you in the short term. I don’t know if you guys have dealt with any of that, but like, do you guys recommend that or how many different ways have you seen that done?

Jeremy Augusta:
Well, it’s been done a few different ways. Most of them are following basically the template that I just described to you.

Fern:
Just the long term buy out stipulations that the the owner will basically get to basically keep the business if that buyer falls.

Jeremy Augusta:
If they don’t work with her. I mean, if you’re working with Chris Cooper and he tells you exactly what to do, you’re gonna be profitable. So if this person is not being profitable, then they’re not working with their mentor. Doing things are not supposed to do. And that’s the person which should get out of that position anyway. Yeah.

Jeremy Augusta:
So for everyone, that’s a real win, because by the time you give away your or your someone takes over your business, if you’re the seller, you know that this person has a year of training with someone whose only job is to make businesses profitable and you can walk away feeling pretty good.

Fern:
And I think all of that some somebody who’s listening to this might be like, why are you guys talking about selling business when I thought this was about jobs? But I think if we zoom out here a little bit to kind of a 30000 thousand foot level, they are absolutely intertwined from because of this. Right. So there’s a really interesting book called Built to Sell. And the whole concept of that book is regardless of whether or not you want to sell your business, you should be able to sell it.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yes. That’s a fantastic book. Everyone should read it.

Fern:
Yeah. If you if you cannot sell it, then it’s that it’s not a viable business. And one of the things that makes a business sellable. Going back to what you do is does it have full time employees? Right. So this is kind of a given take on both sides from a coaching standpoint. You need to be building your resume made that that doesn’t just simply state. I like Crossfit,. It needs to add value to the business. It needs to have the aura. Why positive? You need to be able to a. Educate and educate. Inspire and entertain the athletes on the floor. But you also need to help bring in and clean up the back end administrative piece and have some skill sets that would lend themselves to basically paying for your salary. Right. So if you’re gonna pay me whatever it is, a base salary of 30k, we’ll call it a twenty five hundred bucks a month if that’s what I’m gonna get paid then from. From an employee standpoint is now my job to increase revenue by thirty thousand dollars a year.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. I mean yeah. So if I bring a coach on and I pay them twenty five hundred a month, they have to be worth more and help me generate more than twenty five hundred a month.

Fern:
Yeah. I was just given a baseline level. No Sam you’re like hey you should recoup that. You can’t just take a slice out of it. I don’t know that that’s what a lot of coaches understand is that from a business standpoint you can’t just walk into the business and take a slice out of the pie without making the pie bigger.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. And that’s been that has become something that trying desperately hard to educate coaches on because there’s so many people who are they want to be professional coaches. This is what they want to do for a living. They don’t want to be gym owners .They just want to coach. They enjoy coaching. And so I’m trying to teach these people how you can do that successfully and, you know, enjoy your life and be comfortable.

Fern:
Yeah, I think that’s, you know, a continue to build a resume. Whether that’s you know, I told coaches on it, you should get every possible continue education piece. You get like you should you should get certifications that are really outside the realm of Crossfit,, whether it’s, you know, the R.K., see whether it’s CSC s, whether it’s, you know, USA, W, whether it’s exos, OpEx, all of that. I think everybody should be pursuing all of those. In addition to you don’t have your undergrad or masters or something like that, you should be pursuing those things too. Like those are the things that allow you leverage from a standpoint of like being first in line when a job, when a really good job does come out well.

Jeremy Augusta:
They also make a difference on what you can be paid. I recently did another blog post on how all of those can transfer into basically a base salary based off of experience and education. And so every certification you have and a lot of coaches that are starting to adopt this now, I’ve been finding out in terms of how they hire some of the more certification experience you have, the more money you’re gonna make. So if you’re a student of your industry and those certifications show that that’s going to be more money that you’re going to be able to bring home with you to take care of your family.

Fern:
And I agree and I think this brings up a conversation that I had pretty. Really? And people are like, well, I think Crossfit, is shrinking. It’s definitely not like the micro gym industry is not shrinking. It’s growing.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yet still at a very fast pace.

Fern:
And I don’t think people understand that because they might see the rate of Crossfit, gyms in the United States start to taper off a little bit. But like micro gyms in general. Right. So there’s. There are gyms that are doing other things and Crossfit, that need professionals. And anybody who’s been in a leadership position or who owns a business knows that.

Fern:
There is a shortage of good help. Like just straight up? You know, so if you can be good help like you can get employed. Now, you probably might have to move in some instances, but you know, like if you’re good, you can get work.

Jeremy Augusta:
Yes. And there’s a lot of people who are moving cross-country for some really good jobs and some really fantastic facilities. That’s almost I would say the majority of what’s happening is people are hiring from outside their local area and bringing coaches in.

Fern:
For anecdotally, do you find that those work out better?

Jeremy Augusta:
Yes. You know, I may have nothing else to add to that, yeah. It absolutely works out better.

Fern:
Thats Super interesting.

Jeremy Augusta:
someones not going to move a thousand miles and do a shit job for you.

Fern:
That’s a good point.

Jeremy Augusta:
If someone’s going to pick pack up their family and go that far for your opportunity, they’re going to do their damnedest to make the most of it.

Fern:
That’s actually a really good point.

Jeremy Augusta:
I mean, if they fail at it, well, they’re screwed. They’re in a place. They’ve got nothing, nobody. And they’re basically an island in this area now to themselves.

Fern:
Yeah, that’s that’s a that’s a good point. And I don’t think it’s something that people consider enough because everybody I get the allure of hiring within a month. I’ve been saying you shouldn’t do it, but I do think so. I look at it from. I’m always looking at through my lens and trying to look at it through other people’s lens. Like I’m always trying to think there should be two tracks. There should be the track for the athletes that are great members that I love, that just are passionate about it. And they want to start down the journey of coaching. And I think that path is much longer. Right. And then the other path is I need good help and I need it right now, which means Bob, who really loves Crossfit, and has been here six months, is not the right guy.

Jeremy Augusta:
Right.

Fern:
So I need to come outside of the fold and bring people in, you know. And I think I think some of the arguments against that, quite frankly, are just silly because, you know, the counterargument to that is, well, well, they don’t know the community. And, you know, they haven’t been in the gym. And I’m like, listen, man, like, we all know that every Crossfit, gym is the same people, the same different faces, different color, different heights and sizes. But a good coach will fit in in two days, like they’ll have figured out the lay of the land. They’ll know who the who the queen bee of the members are like. They’re gonna know all that stuff within two days. And good coaches know how to do that well.

Jeremy Augusta:
And if they come in from outside, the also don’t come in with any bias towards any members or any kind of programming because I mean, believe it or not. Crossfit, gyms end up with clickies. Top members, you know, so every class has their clicks and you bring someone in from the outside and they’ve never been a part of any clique which makes a bigger difference than people really think about or would consider.

Fern:
I also think there’s some there is some significant value to just having that separation where that separation of professional vs. personal, you know, and it’s you just don’t have that personal kind of sticking point between, well, you were a member and now you’re here.

Jeremy Augusta:
And now I don’t want to listen to you, which is basically the same reason why officers and enlisted aren’t supposed to threaten us. Yeah. You’re keeping that separation.

Fern:
Yeah. Because that can be challenging, too, which is, you know, in it. And I’ve and I’ve been in situations like that as a J.O. where you’re doing things, where you’re working super close quarters for long periods of time and those lines can be blurred. And from a leadership standpoint, like you have to manage that very carefully, because I do want to be tight with my guys and I do want to take care of them, but at the same time. I’m the boss and I’m going to have to tell you or put you in line at some point. And we both have to acknowledge that that is the relationship and figure out how to make sure that we understand like this is where one relationship ends and this is where the other one begins.

Jeremy Augusta:
I when I brought on the first coach, she was a member. And I had a situation where she started coaching and some of the guys started giving her a hard time, not because she was a female, but just because she was a member that they knew and they were trying to push your buttons and screw with her. And one of my members, lovely guy death. He’s a great person, but I felt he crossed the line and I and basically in a screaming match with this guy in the middle of a class thrown him out, tell him to never come back for disrespecting my coach and a patch and everything up apologizing on both ends. But that’s if I would have brought in a another coach who he had never known. He just simply knows based off of credentials and their leadership position.

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah. I just think that there is. And again, everybody likes to think that Crossfit, is special, but it’s not like people do this in the regular world every day. You bring in an outside manager who comes in and does a really good job or they do a terrible job and you get rid of them. And I think the big fear from most gym owners is what if it doesn’t work out? To which my reply is, so what? Like, what does it matter if it doesn’t work out? What if it does work out like. You have the ability to let this person go and learn something in the process like you’re still going to win and you’re probably not in any more painful of a scenario than you are right now.

Jeremy Augusta:
Worst case scenario is some of your classes got covered.

Fern:
Yeah. Cool. I know you’re busy, man. Where can people find you?

Jeremy Augusta:
Barbell jobs. Dot com Instagram. Barbell jobs, which I post probably eight times a day. Different job positions that are available, which is also on the on Facebook, a barbell jobs.

Jeremy Augusta:
So that’s where I always put my articles which lead back to the Web site, job postings. There’s a ton of posts. If you follow my social media, you’ll see jobs from all over the world all the time.

Fern:
And then any last advice that you’d have either for employers or employees with regard to fitness jobs in general?

Jeremy Augusta:
Yeah. You know, a lot of employers are making the mistake when they put out a. When they put a post for a job opening, it’s almost like they are doing someone a favor by putting out jobs while people don’t realize it. You’re trying to attract the best quality coaches. You’ve got to be the best quality employee and the best quality information. So your job posting is an application to get the best applicants to apply to you. It’s not. Here’s my job. Come, come, fill it. Come work for me. It’s why would they want to work for you? What are you offering? The other gyms do not give information that someone is going to see. And the best people who are now have the highest qualifications and the best fit for you is going to see. And it’s going to attract.

Fern:
From a selfish standpoint, what would some of those things be?

Jeremy Augusta:
Information about your community? So if you guys. OK. So my jam will go play paintball a lot. OK. We do that every every month or so.

Jeremy Augusta:
And so that’s something that you could put on there that gives you a feel of the community. So if someone is looking for a job and they see something that says $18 per class, there’s no one $18 per class. There’s word eighteen dollars per class on the second Saturday of each month. We like to get together. Have a beer. Play a ball. And sometimes community. Well, even that little bit of information just on making more attractive.

Fern:
Do you recommend people put different in job incentives, whether it’s health benefits or retirement benefits on their too? I know most gyms, but I can’t afford that. But obviously, if you could do that.

Jeremy Augusta:
Dude that has been happening a lot more, a lot of gym owners who are who do this not because they enjoy Crossfit,, but because they know what the hell they’re doing. They want to run a good business, are offering incentives like that. And man, they get coaches from all over the country fighting for those.

Fern:
I would imagine. I mean, if I was in the business of coach I like, that’s probably where I’m going. Want to go first?

Jeremy Augusta:
I mean, there’s been a few like there’s one there’s a Crossfit, Palm Beach in Jupiter, Florida. They’re always hiring coaches and not because they are needing or they have a high churn rate. They actually coaches never leave that place. There’s growing at that speed and they offer incentives like that man. There’s been a lot of times where I’ve had to look at my life living in Florida, just a job you can do. There are some seriously big money positions for a professional coach. I have had at least six that start out writing your six figures.

Fern:
That was it. I was going to ask you, what was the highest paid one that you’ve seen so far?

Jeremy Augusta:
The highest paid started out at ninety nine thousand a year. Then there’s others who are right around the area and then below the nets like base pay. Not this is your potential’s like you come here. This is what you’re going to make. You get X retirement, you get X amount days off, you get X amount of computing, education reimbursement and those guys. They know what they’re doing, they’re attracting the best coaches in the world. Yeah, I would imagine investing in their staff.

Fern:
Yeah. And I would imagine there’s is there is a real short, short list for those jobs.

Jeremy Augusta:
There are. Yeah. But if I mean that’s the way to really grow is investing and taking care of your staff.

Fern:
Yeah. Cause wouldn’t you. That’s it. That’s a whole different discussion about how you know, building a building a business that has revenue to support that which I think we should all be trying to do. But yeah, that’s for me that’s always been the goal is like I want to pay coaches really well so that they can be happy and I can be happy and the members are happy. And that way it’s the best hour of everybody’s day.

Jeremy Augusta:
So, I mean, if you put the coaches first, the coaches will take care of the members.

Fern:
Listen man, that’s that’s part of being the best out of everybody’s day. And I think that’s the key. So I think big takeaway here, guys, is always be building a resumé, you know, do your homework when you’re applying for a job. Gym owners don’t just feel like you’re giving people a favor by letting them work for you like it should be beneficial for the employees. You’re like, that’s a mutually beneficial relationship. And, you know, keep pushin. Make the best hour of people’s days and, you know, always work when I can get an education. Jeremy, I appreciate it, brother. This was fun.

Jeremy Augusta:
This was fun. I appreciate ya.

Fern:
Alright brother. We we will see you guys next time. And if you guys need a job, look on barbell jobs, dot com. All right. See ya.

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