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115. Denise Thomas | Part II

115. Denise Thomas | Part II

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It’s really quite hard to express how incredible this group of people are. I think if I tried it would sound super corny, but I’m gonna try anyway, because the world needs to know. – – Over the last two days all CFHQ Seminar Instructors from around the world came together for our bi-annual Trainer Summit. Within our team, there were instructors who were yet to run a seminar, alongside legends like Chuck Carswell, who is only a few seminars away from hitting his 500th gig. (That’s an entire decade of weekends by the way). And, once again, on our 10th Summit, regardless of ability and know-how, it was an educational, challenging, and incredibly inspiring two days. – – There were many amazing moments, but to highlight a few: Joe Alexander’s account from some of our most senior and well-respected leaders perspective on ‘The CrossFit Ethos’, and Todd Widman’s Leadership keynote speech were dynamite! Both presentations forced us to dig deep and ask the questions: “who are we and are we self aware of the actions we take?” Seemingly simple questions, but the answers unearth some hard realizations, for which is the impetus to growth. The answers were beyond powerful in starting or continuing the journey of serving others. It has to start with you. But, you have to be honest…with you. – – Having the opportunity to meet some of our new and upcoming instructors was AWESOME! These individuals are smart, driven, intelligent, and ready to rock! They are ready to say YES, even if they aren’t quite ready (just yet). And, after a ‘kick-ass-throw-the-hammer-heres- the-deal’ “nudge” from Nicole…they’re ready to serve! I couldn’t be more excited to work with them. – – This team…no, this “turd-free” family (@joe.alexander3) will fight for you, inspire you, and always have time for you. We are here to serve and protect from all the bullshit & smoky mirrors that seek to distract you from the good stuff. If you want in on the secret, treat yourself to a Level 1 Trainer Course! I promise it will be the gift of life, because of the individuals in these photographs. Learn, Process, Grow & Give (Dave Castro) – that’s our charge to you! – – 2019 CFHQ Trainer Summit – San Diego, CA ❤️

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On today episode Fern chats with his long-time friend and the only guest to be on 3 times the one the only Denise Thomas. Last time we lost 19 mins of her interviews, we made sure it didn’t happen this time. Along with Denise is answering your question!  They dive into the idea of mastery and what that really means when being a coach to master the fundamentals. The subject of finding people to push to be a better and more important if you show up and ask for help you will get it. – Remember that. There is so much in this episode! Remember to check out the website for timestamps and notes to help you guys work those all this information.

Timestamps.

(8:52) Coming up with Drills for Summit and Coaches Development.
(20:32) Don’t ever Level One Handbook on the shelf
(27:09) Q&A
(27:24) Why we discourage capping of workouts from a coaching standpoint?
(33:37) Do you change your lesson plan based on the people in front of you? Eg more advanced athletes.
(41:42) How do we properly emphasize the notion of proper rest and recovery to new or perhaps injured athletes, especially in spite of scaling the injured athletes continuously who refused to see a medical professional or physical therapist?
(49:12) Advice for new Coaches?
(52:00) Learn the Protocol and it will make you a better Coach (Tell them,  Show them, Coach Them) – For your notes.

Social Media: 

@denthomas7
@dtlessonplans

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Check out our website – besthouroftheirday.com – to learn more about our private coaches development group.

Denise Thomas | Part 2 .mp4 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Denise Thomas | Part 2 .mp4 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2019.

Fern:
All right, everybody, welcome back to this hour of their day, the best hour of your day. I am here with Denise Thomas, my best friend, my pseudo life mate. Because we are trying to recover the lost 19 minutes of her previous episode that we did without it before.

Denise Thomas:
So they’re gone, they’re never coming back.

Fern:
What is a bummer about that is like I think we could agree, like that was the best part of the whole thing. And it’s for some reason, it’s just gone into the abyss.

Denise Thomas:
Well, hopefully we can recapture it.

Fern:
I think so. I think so. So if you guys haven’t listened, the previous episode of had on this is your the the You’re a third time. GUEST So I did one with you in Austin. I did one with you. And then this is number three.

Denise Thomas:
I’m like a a resident best hour of their day.

Fern:
I was more thinking like a fungus that we can’t get rid of.

Denise Thomas:
Next thing I say is you should put me on payroll. Well, Jay, you know, I might be the funniest thing you’ve ever said. Good Job

Fern:
Well, it won’t. You do a lot of these interviews and you get better at it. You better not know. So. So what we did was we we have some topics we’re gonna discuss mostly probably revolving around only because that’s that’s kind of Denise’s thing. Last time we talked very much about lesson planning, because that’s also a thing. But we also did. We pulled, you know, a lot of you guys for some questions. And so we’re gonna do a little bit of a Q&A here with Denise. But real quick, I did want to ask you, like, what was your favorite part of the train summit?

Denise Thomas:
Oh, you know, that’s a good question. I honestly think. Always it’s just to see everybody. That’s a given. But I think I have to say. I thoroughly enjoyed Nicole Carrolls speech on the simplicity of the Crossfit, methodology and how. There is no need to ever change it because it’s super effective and what will end up happening is ten, twelve, 20 years down the line, somebody else. I think she said, we’ll come along and do exactly what we’ve been doing for the last however many years. And we’ll be like slapping ourselves in the face, saying, we know it was affect. Why didn’t we just keep doing what we’re doing? And I think it’s sometimes very hard to. To not just believe in the simple process of what we do and try to change and make it sexy and better. I thought that was really cool and needed, especially when we were all out in the world doing our own, you know, doing our thing. And there is a common message like that. And I really enjoyed those two of the pieces, too. I really enjoyed. Todd talk on leadership and how it really made you look inside to answer the questions about leadership. And I have three things I can’t just have one thing.

Fern:
Just keep going and talking.

Denise Thomas:
Yes. I’m going to keep going. And the third thing was when John Alexander got up and pulled on some of our most senior level leaders, flow masters, and he used quotes directly from them about what it means to understand the Crossfit, ethos, being on a team and then providing examples from across the years and things that we’ve all been and gone through a lot. A lot people don’t hear about, you know, they see us in front of a seminar and given a good word and teaching movements. But a lot of times those delayed delayed flights and, you know, bust tires and you just get to the hotel, there’s nowhere to eat. And I think just talking about that stuff, I think that’s what makes us special, you know, going through the stuff that people don’t see and not really articulate well. So those are the three big things.

Fern:
I think I told Nicole Carol on. At the at the party on what, on Wednesday or whatever that was, I was slightly intoxicated, but I did. I did. I did express or like I. Really enjoy listening to her talk like she is an incredibly captivating speaker. I mean, she does an incredible job of really grabbing your attention and emphasizing things that she really wants to use stick. We’d like to leave with. And she’s probably the master at throwing in colorful language to make it like really effective and not like, you know, vulgar. I think she I think she does that really, really well. And I told her afterwards and I think she understood what I was saying.

Denise Thomas:
Yes. She she just looked at you, smiled and nodded. And said Thank you, Jason.

Fern:
Yeah. You’re fired.

Denise Thomas:
Ya know, no. No, I agree. I think that Nicole has a very unique and special way of communicating into a large body of people. And she’s just very elegant. And and I’ll take you. And it’s clear that she works really hard to find the right message. Every time we meet at the summit, because that’s going to be hard to do. And I think she nailed it this year with the with our messages. Don’t keep me up at night. Yeah.

Fern:
I thought it was very much in line or very akin to Boz speech.

Denise Thomas:
Saltshaker.

Fern:
The saltshaker.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah.

Fern:
You know, we’re talking about is this scenario where you put the salt shaker in the middle of the table and obviously that’s the middle of the table. And then people come along and they want to move it to the edge and say that this is the center. And then your job is to keep it at the center of the table, be like, no, know we’re going to hold the line like this is the center. And then in a Nicole speeches, basically the same thing, just like just recognizing that and understanding that we don’t need to redefine the center like the center as the center for a reason. Is that is the simplicity and the effectiveness of the training program. But now let’s go. I like to get it. I’ve been trying to get everybody’s thoughts on it.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah. I actually have one more. Can I fourth?

Fern:
Listen. I mean, it’s your show at this point as you can have as many as you like.

Denise Thomas:
Because not at the 19 minute mark yet. I really enjoyed me and all the new trainers because I think they said we had 50 to 60 brand new. They said over the last couple.

Fern:
Yeah, I think I think within the past year, I think within the past 24 months, it’s it’s roughly the number which which puts you at about a quarter of the staff is new.

Denise Thomas:
Right. And I was and I made it a point to try and get around every single person and just say hi and introduce myself because I remember my first summit and how overwhelming it was and intimidate and then. I mean, people came up to me and introduced themselves. It made me feel a lot more comfortable and involved and part of the family. So I I met some really cool people, actually. This one guy, Orta from Poland, I came. I went up to him like, hey, my name’s Denise. Like, I know who you are. That’s nice. I, shall we say, in Poland. I know who you are. And I said, oh, my God, you did my level one in 2012.

And then, you know, stop. You want everyone says that. You think. Why did I meet this person? And then he said, neuroma, drinks, gin, beer. And I was like, all right, let me think. I had to think really hard. But I do remember him. Don’t remember that. He said, you gave me a hug and it changed my life. I was like, wow, that’s amazing. You got to get out more as that changed your life, if you like.

Fern:
I mean, I’ve we’ve had many occasions. I don’t feel like my life was ever changed in one of those.

Denise Thomas:
So come on, ya. come on.

Fern:
Well. I mean, listen. Yeah, I know. Now,.

Denise Thomas:
I think he meant he meant like the whole staff really had an impact on him. And he asked me and he asked me, how do I do this? How do I do what you do? And I think it’s one of the best questions somebody can ask you a seminar, because a lot of the times people think they can’t do what we do all year. They think that they’re going to get pushed aside. And I just gave him some instructions on what he needed to do. And seven years later, we sat at a table across Crossfit, HQ training summit. It took him seven years. He never quit. And so it was really, really cool that you got his dream. You know, I didn’t give up That was awesome.

Fern:
That’s. mmm…

Denise Thomas:
7 years.

Fern:
You know, I don’t I don’t think he’s. I don’t think that journey is unique. Right. Like, it’s an incredible journey. But I mean, if you pulled everybody on seminar stuff, they probably have something that sounds very similar, you know?

Denise Thomas:
Yeah.

Fern:
They sought somebody out. They worked really hard. There were some bumps along the road. And then, you know, at some point they attain that. And. With on that same note, you in past years, you’ve been very much involved in the the drills or the breakouts for that, right? So we’re having this conversation about the staff and how great it is people make it. But. I’ve always found it to be like even overwhelming to think about the idea of coming up with drills that would challenge that group move right. And then. So a lot of what I wanted to ask you is like with regard to coach development, that’s one of the questions we get on a very regular basis is how do I start to develop my coaches? Like how do I start to work on them, improve them? And obviously, you want to have a lot of feedback, but some of that needs to be practice and drills and that are contrived and, you know, setting things up so that you can run through and you drive and do dry runs on them. How what’s your process for coming up with some of those drills when you’re working with coaches either at Reebok one or when you’re preparing for the summit? Because that’s an overwhelming one.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah, well, we’ll tackle the summit first because that is a beast. But honestly, the answer is really simple. The last one we had, not the most recent one, the one before that. I was on it with Austin Malleolo, and we just sat and thought, well, the thing about all these crazy drills and how we could make it fun and exciting and ultimately we were like, we’ll want it. What do they need and what do they want? And I always remember just one in feedback on me running a real estate small group or a part of a small group and having somebody look over me and say, hey, this is this is OK. Do this better. So we use that as a drill. We use that to be pretty much the basis, honestly, is you’re just gonna get feedback on your small groups. There were some other things that we always sometimes see people struggle to pace correctly through timelines, whether it be overall timeline or the microcosm timelines for all movements. The next so it’s a little lesson plan template and the other two pieces. We’re also big staples while most active classroom. Just how to run it because it’s very stylistic way of running it. But there are very direct things that have to be gotten. Take them through. So we just did a demonstration and then we we took we broke up the groups and we worked on active classrooms. And then the last one, which was a really cool one, was check back drills, because a lot of the time we’ll see coaches give cues and then they’ll walk away and they won’t look back to see if it was effective at all. And what that does is it limits to correctional toolbox because you then are very limited. Do you have a couple of things that you use a lot and you walk away? You think they work. But if you actually stop and then turn around and take a look. It may work, but it may not. And if it doesn’t, then you have to either say it again, maybe they didn’t hear you or maybe see that it doesn’t work. Then you got to try something else. And maybe they have one or two of the cues that can help the athlete. But if they don’t, that’s what your tool toolbox ends. And that’s when we get into the root causes of problems and why things are happening. And this is a whole another git like foundation to what it needs to correct. Well. So this drill was really effective because people would give the cue and then just walk walk by and not look back. And we’d like to take a look and they’d look back and and then they would see a fault. It was just very a very cool drill that we used and that we still talk about it now. I think we say and this year it was the same thing. What do they need? What do they want? Where can we make them wait? Like we have the most value to two hundred trainers that are all at different levels. And I think one of the drills this. Summit was the feedback waterfall that that one was really, really cool.

Fern:
I enjoyed that.

Denise Thomas:
Because the other two were having a small group get feedback. I was great. I want to start with these people in the last one was a great way to just help deliver actually questions again from the periphery standpoint, our sense of direction. Well, that feedback, what Walter fontion in checks so many boxes in such a limited time.

Denise Thomas:
The new trainers coached then the level to train has watched the new trainers coach and they gave feedback to the level one trainer. The flow master was watching the level to instructor give feedback to a level one instructor. And then the flow master would take the level two instructor off to the side and give them feedback on how they gave feedback. It was just there’s a lot of feedback and it was just viewer.

Fern:
Yeah, it was like it was impressive to see all of that happening at once. Like everybody is is kind of in the drill where usually it’s like one person is involved. But at this point you get to you get to get everybody involved because even though the other trainers who are the who are the athletes in that scenario are not necessarily like engaged, they’re present for the feedback from the level two trainer to the level one trainer or so. Like they’re they’re gonna get to learn something from that feedback. And I know and at least in our group, you could see everybody in the group, like as people were coaching, as people are giving feedback, people are like scooping up little pieces of knowledge like, oh, that’s a great way to say that I’m going to change it. Or like who I understand or you’re saying that’s a that’s a good way to phrase it or that’s a that’s a unique drill. I think going back to the to the to the check back drill. I think that was important because I think if you’re not if coaches are leaving out the check back, let’s just call it like check back or affirmation like that. Like you’re leaving like 50 percent of your tool box at home. Really, you’re just you’re literally going to work with half of the things you need for the day. And I think if people are putting and that’s what I always try to push people towards when they get stuck there, like they don’t see anything. I don’t see anything. I don’t see anything. And I’m like, well, let’s just switch us. I’m like, what’s going well? And I’m like, oh, that’s really good. I’m like, well, let’s let’s address that then. Like, give that person a little pat on the back for keeping their torso vertical on the push press or whatever it may be. And I think people forget to do that because we get so honed in on the negative. We’re like how to fix bad movement that we forget the half

Denise Thomas:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. I think that’s the correction one. Well this is a really tricky one. So you just have to give a lot of corrections. A one will stick against them all and it is obviously not a one size fits all. But if you do not check that, you never know if your correction was effective. And it all comes down to the discipline again, having the system, I mean we could completely go into a different branch and place now with group management and you know, you fifteen people and you have three progressions. And how many cases should you give her actually, and how you supposed to see everybody? You know, if you don’t, who do you prioritize? So there’s there’s just always somewhere else to go in this game.

Fern:
Yeah, but that’s a big takeaway is that none of us ever done, you know, like I mean, there’s some incredible trainers at the summit and everybody leaves their, you know, a little bit broken down thinking like, man, I got work to do, which is a good place to be. What kind of body? Always everybody always leaves, though, the summit a little bit hungry if you guys do similar things like I know you guys do daily stuff like that, but you guys do and you like larger things like that at Reebok. I’m trying to think if like if somebody was trying to replicate the something that would resemble the summit at their box, like how would they go about doing that?

Denise Thomas:
Yeah. Honestly, Jay, we don’t do as much development anymore. And it’s not because we’re we don’t need it. We all need it. And if we do it, it’s always on a one on one basis or one on two all whenever anybody is not busy. Because I Jim so unique in the sense that we we have the second floor n open gym and all the machines and downsize with the Crossfit, space and all of us. What upsides and downsides. So we’re not just running Crossfit, classes. So it’s very hard to get all seven full time trainers in one space at one time because there’s things to be done outside of just Crossfit,. So we have to change our model. But I can tell you what we used to do before we had additional responsibilities and it was once a week we tried and then I think we moved from simply two weeks. We would just get the staff together and we would often and I would take drills and we took a lot of drills from the level two the see drills, the correction drills. We did teaching drills where you would have 60 seconds to teach a movement. We did public speaking drills, not just in fitness, but we will give them a topic. And they had to prepare a five minute speech. We give them a template of intro body close. And they had to prepare just a little how to brush your teeth. And it could be a topic on like religion and you got to pick whatever it was. And all we were looking at is, are you able to prepare a speech and format it correctly? Because that’s what we do when we present, especially in front of the whiteboard. So we do things like that. We did it. We also do personal drills. Like we would sit together and we pair off. And we talked to each other about our biggest fear. And our biggest strengths and just a discussion between you and that other person. And then if I was with you, we would come back into the big group and you would explain to the group what some of my fears are. And that’s scary to be vulnerable. But if you want to be in a highly functioning team, you have to have a level of vulnerability. And it helps you drop your ego and then you can build. So there was some of the harder drills that we would do with. You know, we’re exposing ourselves. We did everything. Everything you can imagine. We did well.

Denise Thomas:
We do gymnastics. Teach him. Teach forward rolls, backward rolls like those things that we don’t typically see in a Crossfit, class. You know, it’s not like the meat and potatoes. And it was just a way of us learning how to teach all the things outside of Pull-Ups and Muscle ups And yeah. So yeah.

Fern:
We also don’t do it as much as we used to for a lot of different reasons. But that’s something that’s like I’m really trying to wrap my brain around. I do have one of the other things we used to do is we we’ve we’ve done like some of the improv games too where it’s just like public speaking bass. And it just kind of getting people out of their shell. We’ve done the same type of presentation, but the one of the coaches would have to present on it like they would have to teach the group a movement and then they would get feedback from the group on how that went. We’ve done all the singing and checking drills, but I think for for new coaches are people who are trying to do development. One of the things to remember is that kind of going back to where we’re talking about with the cause, like simplicity is sometimes best. Like most people don’t need a crazy complex drill. Like for most people, the level two drills of seeing and correcting are going to be more than enough for a long time.

Denise Thomas:
Oh, yeah. It’s. I think they all good enough for everybody because you can tweak the drill to the level of the person in front of you from very static, so gross errors on one person to a group of 10 looking at dynamic, subtle folds like tiny deviations and asking who is the three best movers, who who needs more help? So on and so forth. But that’s that word. Simplicity is. So underestimate at the level one manual and this was something you don’t count on summit too. There is everything in that level, one side that the participants get the level one. There’s everything in that it can make them the best trainers in the world, but it has to be mastered. And that’s all the red shirts do. Every weekend, the HQ staff, they go and they coach the nine foundational movements, the squat fornt squat overhead, squat, press, push press, push jerk, deadlifts mode. I lift med ball clean and they do it every weekend and they can master the ability to teach and correct to a small group of people with 10 people. And then they take they take that and take those themes and the ability to identify gross and solve all static and dynamic positions across a bunch of people. And they apply it to muscle ups, snatches, running, rowing, because they’re all themes.

Denise Thomas:
Right. We talk lot about the level, too, that the name of the exercise in itself is less important than the positions that you’re looking for. So that’s what we do. So there’s everything in that. And the sad part about it is I started to add this into my closing remarks at the level ones is don’t let this day be the last day that you open up this level one training guide. This should be something that you read often. You memorize, you practice in real time, not just memorizing it to regurgitate it, but you actually do it. And I promise, I almost can guarantee that you would be among some of the best Crossfit, trainers in the world. Well, the sad part is, is that the book gets closed and they you know, and not to no fault of their own, although they do have a say. Some trainers just get rushed into a class a day. They pass the level one class and there they don’t have. Sometimes support because, you know, the business model is tough. You can put two coaches in every class and they don’t always get time to go through that journey. Specially when they’re part time, they have all the jobs and things. So I just think if they just give a little bit more attention to that level one, that is very helpful because it’s all in that what you need. You know, its faults. Fix’s you know,.

Fern:
I I agree with you. And it’s funny. CASSIDY and I were just talking earlier and I forgot why it came up. I was I was just doing a video for the for the gym. And when I came back in, I was talking to him. I said, I remember when I used to freak out about saying the phrase about intensity because I was like, I can feel. But now I I can like, if you caught me in the middle of grocery, I could roll that off my tongue. Like, I mean, it’s taken me like hundreds and hundreds of reps of saying that just like the progressions for the pusher and all that stuff. And I get the people are in a tough situation, but that doesn’t change your ability to to prepare beforehand. Right. Like you might not be in an ideal scenario where there’s multiple coaches, you might have to go to your level one or go to your level one and and teach Monday. But you can still prepare like you can still study beforehand. Like you can still do some of the legwork. And it doesn’t have to be a ton. It’s it’s the little pieces over time. And I think that, like, what makes a great trainer, it’s not like you studied for three hours and then you’re good. It’s the it’s the long term dedication to the simplicity and the details that allows you to garner that knowledge and then be able to distribute that knowledge over time. And I think that’s what people are missing, is you don’t need to leave the level one trainer or guide every day. You should read a page a day. And if you’re doing that over and over and over, you’ll be one of those people that can just recite level and training guide, which makes you far more prepared to step in front of athletes and coach.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah, no, I agree. I think a friend of mine once said fake it till you make it. You definitely need to memorize that stuff, at least in the beginning. But I agree with the preparation piece. It’s. There’s no excuses to not prepare. It could be five minutes. It could be fifty five minutes. But just pick one element of the class that you really want to focus on and do that the best you possibly can and be OK with maybe not going through everything else. It isn’t always realistic to do that. And that level one guide is money.

Denise Thomas:
It’s amazing.

Fern:
Yeah. They’re.

Denise Thomas:
And the level two.

Fern:
Yeah. They’re just an incredible amount of information in there. And you should learn other things. But if you if you’re doing just that, you’ll be a damn good Crossfit, coach. I mean, damn good.

Denise Thomas:
It’s insane. We have a guy gym right now. He’s. He was an intern and he just got more of a part time job. And he wants to be on seminar staff. And here’s the other thing. He asks me every single day to help him. Every day. Some days I’m I can’t always help. But you’ll come back the next day and you’ll ask. And we do a lot of work together. And he’ll be like, can you watch me? Can you watch me coach the presses for ten minutes? Can we go to the broad? Can you break down the timeline again? When do I do squat therapy? What happens if this happens? And I just I love it. I love his relentlessness. And I always we always say there is. I’m sure you’ve said it. I’ve said it. I know a bunch of the people in staff said, if you want to do this job and you’re in the area. Email us. Come see us. We’ll help you come. I’ve had maybe two people my hold in ten years working for Crossfit, actually take me up on it and then it’s awesome.

Fern:
I’ve only had one.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah, exactly one. I mean, I know when I was trying to get better, we we definitely did not have the resources we have right now on the Internet or, you know, the gym on every corner. And I had to go above and beyond to get somebody to help me. That wore a red shirt and they were super willing to help me. Jen Hunter, Rob Miller. Amy, you know, I just. And we. They have. We’ll have it now, fingertips . Yes. But I just I love that. I love when people one want to get better and they and they take you up on it.

Fern:
And people do want to get better. And because people aren’t showing up to our gyms, the next best thing we could do is Q&A. So I’ve got I’ve got some. I’ve got some. You like that? That was a really nice Segway.

Denise Thomas:
Because we could talk for a while.

Fern:
So we got a couple of questions here lined up. But I actually do want to start with the first one that you and I were discussing beforehand, which was the email about why do we discourage capping workouts from a coaching standpoint. So elaborate on that. I summarized the overly long question, but if you want to read it and I don’t know if you have it available to you, but I don’t have it. That was the gist of the question is like why do you guys discourage capping workouts?

Denise Thomas:
Yeah, and I think it might. Yeah. If that’s why it said there’s a difference between a time cap and an ad time that you should shoot for all comes down to the whiteboard if the introduction and how you how you articulate this because. When you brief a workout, you tell the athletes. This workout is for the intended stimulus can be anywhere between 2 minutes and 10 minutes. We don’t really want you to go any longer than 10 and we’re going to make sure that we get you to the right loaded with the right reps scheme and the right movements in order to be under that 10 minute time. Well, that doesn’t mean we stop at 10 minutes. If we do if we do go over 10 minutes, it’s very possible that it’s a super special scenario and it’s that last person going and everyone’s cheering and it’s going to change that person’s life. Or we as coaches, if they maybe five people in a twelve person class that are all going way over that 10 minute time. We as coaches probably didn’t do our job as well as we should. When it came to scaling. Now, what happens? And that’s hard. That’s hard to do. Scale a large amount of people to the right way. So a time cap is different. Giving them the intended stimulus. A time cap is when we do have a hard stop at 10 minutes time caps a great for competition. That’s I think that’s why we can’t just have people keep going for hours and hours so we time cap it. Time caps are great when we’re doing maybe something like even a hero workout. We can. Right. You’re going to get through as much of this as you can in forty five minutes in a class setting, right? Not. You just doing it by yourself in a class.

Denise Thomas:
Time caps also just save the coach’s ass when they don’t have the ability to scale people correctly. And the reason why it’s not a problem to time it becomes a problem when there’s a five round workout. And athletes only get in through three rounds of it. And then in the intended time, because what would then do in is changing this task priority workout where we’re trying to finish a workout all time, which gives you less incentive to pace because you want to push and financial need. Now, people don’t want to be lost. It turns this ball time.

Denise Thomas:
Work out into a amrap where they’re just going to try and get through as much of this as they can in, let’s say, 10 minutes. And if we do that all the time, we will lose in that ability to vairy the goal. Right. So when you say time cap, that means that we’re going to stop the workout. When you say I’d like you guys to be within this time range, but when it’s not going to stop, that tells them that that’s what they should be shot in for. But they’re not going to get saved by the clock. So it’s not that you should all you should not. It’s more of a why are you doing it? Is there a better way? And are you doing it all the time?

Fern:
I think it’s. No, I agree with you. There are there definitely like a time and a place for it? I mean, I don’t know what your thoughts are, but my experience is that it’s not that frequent like it’s in it’s in special circumstances. More often than not, we see it used when coaches just are not going through proper scaling, haven’t expressed what the stimulus is. And what we’re really doing is like we’re just giving people an excuse to like forego the intent of the workout, be like, listen, you’re just going to move and you’re gonna do this completely missing the mark and ultimately intensity almost inevitably always goes down in scenarios like that where they’re not maintaining the intensity we want and thereby losing some of the results or not getting the results at the rate that we would like them.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah,.

Fern:
Most most people use it as a crutch, not not as like a tool to help them run a more efficient class. Just like our guys, we’re just gonna start. And then at twenty five minutes I’ll cut you off and then, you know, all these people are executing the workout incorrectly and it’s just like an excuse for you to not run over times that just being better at your craft.

Denise Thomas:
Right. And the end is executing the work incorrectly. I mean, you’ll get fit doing doing Crossfit, whether you do it right or you do it wrong. Right. You do get fit. I think we’re just where the affected people we want effectiveness and we want them to get the right by and not miss the mark. That’s when people don’t get the results as quickly as they should because they’re doing Crossfit,. Maybe a moderate intensity because they went too heavy on the bar and now they’re drunk and it a. And that’s why they’re only getting three rounds when they should be getting five. And I think it’s more a it can be done better. Yeah. So, you know, we say we I think we often on these podcasts, we often say we see we see a lot of on those people. And I really hope the listeners asset sitting there saying, well, we don’t do that, you know, and that’s not our gym. We don’t believe in that. And we do that. So we do. You know,x y z because that’s great. I hope people I know we don’t do that. Not only do that with people.

Fern:
Because of the best out of their day podcasts. The tides are changing. I’ll tell you that we’re having a global impact.

Denise Thomas:
You’re just taking over.

Fern:
Yeah, we’re trying to take over the world. OK. Second question, when coaching a class of advanced athletes and this is something you and I discussed, I think when I was there previously, how much do you deviate from the lesson plan to drill down the cues at the micro level? So you have a group of pipe hitters essentially. Do you change your lesson plan based on the people in front of you? And then to what degree am I going to nit pick these athletes?

Denise Thomas:
Ok. So there’s a lot in that question, I think, first of all, what what what is an advanced athlete . Right. I think we have to define that when we see how much attention they get. And I think for the purposes of this talk, an advanced athlete is he or she that can do all Crossfit, workouts that come out on Crossfit, dot com in the intended time home range. Right. So they don’t they. There’s nothing that comes up that they cannot do. And there’s not many of those in each affiliate.

Fern:
I can’t do that .

Denise Thomas:
Yeah. Well, Jay, you know. You know,.

Fern:
I’m not fit.

Denise Thomas:
It’s not good test. It’s not the test. I think in our gym we have like five hundred members. And I think that we probably in any one class might get one or two maybe. Right. I can say that all this person could do it all. So the Intermedia athlete would be Yoshie that could do. A lot of them work out as prescribed, but if it gets a little heavy, they have to deload or if it’s high skill gymnastics, they might have to put the reps down and that’s them. That’s a lot of people in your gym, especially those being comming for years and years. And then you have your beginners, right, who are going to have light loads. They’re going to be focusing mostly on movement patterns and points. And so it’s important to know when you ask the question, what do we give advanced athletes and do we change the plan that we understood from an advanced athlete is? And I would say that most athletes in any one gym fall under the intermedia category.

Fern:
Yeah, I would agree.

Denise Thomas:
Let’s just say we have advanced those advanced athletes in class. And I don’t change my lesson plan for any individual in the class, in my lesson plan. I make considerations that if those athletes show up. So I will pick progressions and practice sessions and loading periods in order to. To satisfy a mixed ability class, I’ll call reps. I’ll hold positions, everyone. We’ll do that together. Am I a beginner all the way up to advance? And then when I when we get into the loading period or if I give them a couple of minutes to practice a movement, I’ll go around and I will give the advance athlete some strategies on on technique all time ranges that I’m looking for them to get offset and movements and and set them little individual goals. And I’ll do the same for the beginner. I’ll do the same thing for intermediate , which is why when you write in your lesson plan, sometimes it’s better to give them a time period to practice versus giving them a set and rep scheme, because if you give them a rep scheme, you’re gonna get them. They’ll have done five reps and then they look inside to you, right. Versus saying, hey, go and practice for a minute. Try to accumulate about ten to fifteen reps. You don’t have to be done consecutive where the movement is going to come around and help you out. So, no, I don’t. I don’t tweak my plan, but I do make sure that I’m ready for all those athletes coming in. And that comes to another point. Right. You should know generally what the majority level experience level of that class is so Reebok Crossfit, One. We know that our seven forty five years of age, a biggish class of ten fifteen people. We have a mixed ability, a group from advanced through to begin. I know that I already know what kind of plan I’m going to have.

Denise Thomas:
But then the noon class, the majority level and that is is Intermedia into advance. So I’m going to provide a plan that’s is gonna meet the level of the majority. But I’m also gonna get ready for Alex, who is a bodyguard. Bodyguard down at the casino. And he’s pretty new. He loves that class. So I got to make sure I position myself in it in a way that Alex doesn’t get lost.

Fern:
Yeah.

Denise Thomas:
Then in the four O’clock Class is a big class and they’re all into it like middle intermedia beginner. So I have to provide a plan that you just should have some idea of what that majority level is. But as long as you’re prepared in your plan for any individual come into your class, any population, you’ll be able to knock it out the park versus having to deal with it in the moment.

Fern:
Yeah, I think I think just to summarize that is it shouldn’t matter who’s in your class. Like you should be coaching the crap out of everybody, you know, like nobody’s that good where they like don’t need any coaching, although Matt Fraser pretty good. I watched him work out this past weekend like he doesn’t need a ton of coaching he’s just fit.

Denise Thomas:
But Matt what needs is someone to look at him working out and see if they can see any holes and any weaknesses. It could just be even time and these rest periods.

Fern:
Yeah. You know, I just brought up athletes like that is largely like strategy. Like what? Like what’s the fastest means of getting you through this? How we’re going to break these up? Like, are we going to break them when we don’t necessarily need to? But it’s going to help us get through the full set faster. That’s what you can help those those more advanced athletes if we want to call them that. Like what should their sets of muscle ups look like? Like how many pull ups should they do in a set of 50 in a workout like Unbroken? So stuff like that. That’s where I think, you know, like if if they’re if they’re really good movers, then switch your mindset strategy. And I think you can give a lot of value there with some of that or maybe give them a stretch goal, you know, say like well, like you were saying, we like when she gets to play around with whatever this is, let’s call it the power clean for the next five to six minutes. But I want you guys to practice cycling and getting your knees out of the way when you put the bar back down on the floor. Stuff like that, where you can really kind of help them break through to that next level of whatever it is that they’re chasing after Ray and see it.

Denise Thomas:
And any athlete, if they ask the strategy out, will help them. I don’t think you have to be the advanced, high level intermediate athlete to have that special treatment. Well, we’ll give love to everybody, but you just have to triage is to what that athlete needs. In that moment. So. Yeah, and I Mat Fraser elite, too, that, you know.

Fern:
Yeah, he’s way past events.

Denise Thomas:
Know he’s way beyond. And he’s using the sport. He’s in the specialization world of Crossfit,.

Fern:
So he’s suspended his score. So I judged him on where it mayhem him. And he did the workout in six minutes and eight seconds.

Denise Thomas:
Which one? This one?

Fern:
Point twenty point three. Ah, yeah. Oh, no. Last week’s. Last week.

Denise Thomas:
What was his time?

Fern:
6 :0 8 Austin beat him.

Denise Thomas:
He got me by second.

Fern:
One second. You didn’t do that shit, in six 0 seven. Nice try, though.

Denise Thomas:
I’ll tell you what, mine did go like two minutes of twenty one handstand push ups and a me hopping down from the wall and looking around and go, why is it harder for me than it is for everybody?

Fern:
Ok.

Denise Thomas:
I was so sad. That’s end

Fern:
It’s. Yeah. That guy’s freakishly fit. What’s weird, though, is when I was watching him work out and I was like, I feel like that’s what I’m doing when I workout, but it’s definitely not.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah. I saw Austin do it in. He did it in like.

Fern:
Sub 6?

Denise Thomas:
Six twelve and then he did it again. I mean you can pick three better movements for him. It’s like. Yeah, yeah. But anyway, we got our.

Fern:
Next question. How do we properly emphasize the notion of proper rest and recovery to new or perhaps injured athletes, especially in spite of scaling the injured athletes continuously who refused to see a medical professional or physical therapist?

Denise Thomas:
That’s a long question.

Fern:
It is.

Denise Thomas:
That is that is the question. How do we help people that don’t want to rest when they’re injured?

Fern:
I think that would be a very good way of summarizing how do we express the value of rest to people who are injured to say, you know, there’s a balance of like continuing to train, but doing it like obviously more intelligently at that point. Because because when you’re injured, the. The goal changes. Right. So that goal is just to continue to move to some degree. And I think that’s what they’re asking. How do you emphasize to an injured athlete the value of rest and recovery even though you’re already scaling this athlete?

Denise Thomas:
I think when somebody has all this, again, there’s a difference between injury and. Like being hurt. I’ll be sore. If it Sore it’s just a matter of scaling scan that is an injury like they have physical pain when they lift a barbell, if they do it and movement you as the coach, you you don’t manage that. You tell them stop like that. There’s no there’s really no new negotiations on that because we’re not in the business of allowing people to work through situations that will further harm them and the way that that athlete responds. It’s probably going to come from a place of frustration and upset and kind of annoyed, but that doesn’t mean that we allow them to continue doing it. And that’s really what that is. It’s like, no, please stop. I understand your frustration, but this is what we’re going to do and then you find something super creative for them to do. If you have an athlete, that’s. Constantly working out and they don’t understand the value of rest and recovery. Is that part of the question, too?

Fern:
I think people get that those are like your typical headaches in the gym. This one was specific to injuries and I think you nailed it on the head. But something like you could probably elaborate on is where I feel that I’ve missed the mark in the past and people can miss the mark. Here is when somebody is injured, they will many times dial up something that the athlete still wants to train, obviously. Otherwise we wouldn’t get this question. But they probably feel like they’re not doing anything. So we failed. We failed to challenge them while. While circumventing the injury to still train, so we failed right on as creative as possible to be like, listen, this is still gonna be really hard. We’re just not going to use your right arm today.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah. No. Yeah. And I think it comes down to the trainer again and how they’re able to create something that keeps them engaged. They get a good workout in. What if we give them a scaling, an option that doesn’t challenge them and they do get bored, they’re gonna get frustrated and want to use the injured limb or or something like that. So I think, again, that comes down to asking questions, researching and then talking to the athlete. And just does it hurt when you do that? Does it hurt when you do this? What about this one? About that? And you can just completely change the workout. If they can’t pull off squat because their lower back is injured, give them something. Put them on the bike. Turn into something that’s more of a metabolic conditioning workout. That’s OK. Even if the goal that day is to lift heavy and they cannot lift heavy, they can’t bench they can’t press. Put him on a bike. Change the workout. Keep them involved and just let them know. Don’t worry when you come back, because we still move in because you still showing up and you’re you’re keeping your brain fresh. You’re going to be in a much better place than if you just stopped altogether at all. Or if you keep fighting through this injury, it happens. We have we have athletes and ajin that we tell we tell them go, hey, go to go see a doctor, go see a doctor. They come in, they’ll tell you, yeah, it’s not so bad. And then halfway through the workout, you see him grabbing their shoulder and you just stop you just stop all one of those. Oh, my shoulder. Go and stop doing that. Grab this dumbbell and a pull up. You going to do. Gonna do single arm rows but but but. No, no negotiation. Ya Know. And if you’re in the right environment, in the right culture, in your gym, they know you care about them. There shouldn’t be any hard feelings. Or up set them.

Fern:
I never had to push back on that in the years. Like never. Like they want you to stop them. Like they bailed are like just waiting for you to come over. They’re doing particularly well.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah, please help me I’m poor.

Fern:
Particularly, particularly if they’re in pain. But I want to throw a challenge out there because I don’t think this idea of challenging people in scaling is solely relegated to two injured athletes. I think we could all be better at scaling athletes and progressively finding better ways to challenge people. And I will bring this up in the programming lectures, which is like your scaling options should be as varied, if not more than your programming in general. Like if you do not have a dozen scaling options for each movement, then that’s now your homework to progressively scale people to get where they need to go. It’s like. Yeah. The typical scenario is the purple band person. Why? Why are we not doing Ringrose? Why are we not doing inverted Ringrose? Like what? If we’re gonna do. Negatives. What’s an appropriate volume for that? But like all of those can be incredibly difficult. But like, we have to put some time and effort energy into finding out. Is this going to challenge that person and is it going to keep them engaged with the class? Not feeling like we left out. Like that’s really that’s a I think scaling is the most underrated skill in coaching.

Denise Thomas:
Oh, it’s so hard. And it comes down to knowledge of excuse me, movement function, because even though the movement might look different, we keep the function relatively similar to what they were doing. You gonna get you can get some of those benefits, but I think it comes down to not understanding the protocol of our process of elimination to get to that scaling option. And it is hard and I don’t envy anyone in a gym that a coach in a class of 15, 20 people by themselves having to go around a scale, a bunch of people, it’s really freaking hard.

Denise Thomas:
And that’s I genuinely believe the best trainers in the world just manage that situation really well. And it’s less about the lesson plan is easy. It’s easy to create a lesson plan if you really think about it. Well, being able to offer scaling options throughout each session. Every progression should be a scaling option for the injured and for the people that cancel it. You can’t just assume that everybody can do a Kip swing or a kick or whatever it might be. Yeah, I agree with you that the movement function range of motion questions or huge comes to scaling.

Fern:
Next question. What? And this one is a sense of a little bit deep. So what is the best piece of advice you could give a new coach maybe that you’ve come up with? Or what’s the best piece you’ve been given by someone else as you’ve developed your coaching skill?

Denise Thomas:
I think. The best piece of advice I can give to a new coach is, is master the fundamentals. And that’s from Coach Glassman. He says All the time must the fundamentals. And over the years I’ve just learned to respect that sentence. So like more and more and more and more, because the fundamentals are. Within those within those movements and those themes is everything you need to be on your to be one of the best. So mastering the what does mastery mean? And I don’t know if we discussed this last time, or at least to me, mastery means that you can teach.

Denise Thomas:
All those nine foundational movements. To a 10 people, call it where you’re able to see static and dynamic balls both in gross and subtle positions. And if you if you are seeing those faults, you have multiple corrections to each faults while being able to keep the rest of the group engaged and not just neglect them for for the sake of consumption with one person and allowing that group to know that you care about them and you’re inspiring them and you’re motivated. Now take that with just the basic ask what right do. Just doing that alone through mastery of coaching 10 people through the air squats is really hard and it isn’t that distant horizon that we really never meet. Now take that skill set and put it into a class. So you can see now how much harder that would be. So I think for me, just mastery of those fundamentals. We’ll give you an a really solid foundation for being the best in everything else.

Fern:
I think. That is probably a perfect summation of that. So to challenge people like if you really want to experience what that looks or feels like, like here’s a challenge for you. Can you coach continuously the air squat for let’s just call it 20 minutes while keeping everybody engaged? Like the air squat. You and I’ve seen it a million times or somebody you know, they do a couple squats and they say, I think they’re good.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah, they’re good.

Fern:
Let’s let’s rewind that, my friend. You know, like. And do you do you feel like you could always go along? And I think once you start and I’m not saying I’m a master at this, but I think once you start to approach something that could potentially look like mastery, you never feel like you have enough time.

Denise Thomas:
Because, well, then, you know, you’ve mastered it, but then move at 50 percent. They’re not moving at games. The speed them up now. Speed them up. Now, can you see those cell phones now? You able to get those quick corrections? Can you look across the room while the circle formation you have and keep people engaged?

Denise Thomas:
It just keeps it’s just another place to go is like being an athlete and Crossfit, you you must the one thing you want two of them you want three of them, you want the next variation. It’s. I I masteries is really, really hard, especially when you understand.

Denise Thomas:
What it means to master something that the athlete and the better athlete, the harder it is and I think.

Fern:
Exactly.

Denise Thomas:
Sorry. It’s you then get into the question of, well, what do I do with those people? Well, they don’t listen in class. All right. Well, why are they not listening? Right. Why are they not listening? And sometimes I’ll be like, well, they just you know, they think they think they’re above it. And I’m like, do they think they like maybe they do what we love. We done to let them know that they they do have more to do. Because if we’re not giving them the attention, which is also group management. Right. Attention to each athlete, we have to look at ourselves when any one athlete in any class complains, grumbles, doesn’t listen. What are we doing to solve that? And I think a lot of times, as we say that word again, a lot of times we see sometimes that the coach cannot see quick enough or can not see the subtleties or some of the techniques that the athletes doing. And then they they get bored. They don’t get coach and they want more. They want more because they plateaued. Our eye to keep on. We have to get spare eye. Right.

Denise Thomas:
And I think that’s why those those Level 2 courses and the coaching element program and all the cost Crossfit, preferred courses. You know, from weightlifting to rowing and gymnastics, that that’s why they’re so great, because it elevates your bar to something that went missing. And dealing with those athletes.

Fern:
And I think the way to get there is kind of where we started with this, which is the simplicity of it. You know, I think we talked about a couple podcasts ago about this and you just mentioned it just now, the speed at which you see things. And I know how you feel, but the only way to see things really quickly is to not have to allocate mental resources to other things, meaning like I don’t need to think about what is going to happen next. I don’t need to think about what are the points performance of the air squad or what are the fault of the air squad. I know those and I know I’m like the back of my hand and a good coach should that allows me to focus my eyes. Because if I was thinking about I think about it in an on days when I’m coaching, when I’m just distracted by other things like forget, like, whatever. I don’t see as well because my like, I have mental resources allocated to other things other than is the depth of that deep drive and the push pressed too much like is that why they’re coming forward or do they need to turn their toes out to get their knees out of the way? Like if you have to be thinking about all of those things versus just seeing it, you know what to react. I think that’s where the struggle is, which means most people just need to put in more time into the basics, which is just like, OK, what should this movement look like? How is it incorrectly? What is the speed and timing? How should that look and all that stuff? Yeah. And to see fast.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah. And also, if we peel back to tea each, then there’s a there’s a protocol that you can follow it. Yeah. It might seem contrived, but. But it is when you’re to learning and it does feel a little fake and little contrived. And it’s demo the movement. Hey, this is the push press.

Denise Thomas:
This is what it looks like through the full movement. OK. The call will be go. You’re going to focus on X? Let’s say keeping the heels down that. I’m going to look for that. And then I’ll say we said so ready? Go on, we’ll look at your heels and we stand ready to go. And just having the protocol of do this, do this, do this, do this, do this. And just keep repeating that for the athletes in the class. It’s like when you learn to drive. What do you do? You look in your mirror. Right. You see that there’s no cars you signal.

Denise Thomas:
You look in your mirror again and then you make the turn and then you you blink goes off. And now now what happens when you drive? And it’s like, look, both of them. Because you did it so many times the right way with a protocol.

Denise Thomas:
But now it becomes second nature. And you can start to think about those other things you just talked about. Why is this happen in mobile mobile phones? But I think that we don’t spend enough time just practicing a simple 10-plus. Before we start to try other things, maybe that’s why we might miss things, too.

Fern:
Yeah. No, I agree. Because the like like you said, like the protocol is important, but but too you have to practice the protocol like you said, like simply having the protocol is not enough. I’m sure you’ve seen at a level two where on a countless occasions where I’ve given the protocol to somebody and simply not having the ability to follow the protocol is what gets them in trouble or the discipline or the protocol. Then theirs like their two reps in and they’ve already abandoned the protocol. No, no, no. Stay. Go back. Started over like we’re gonna practice this by the numbers and that’s how you get faster. So.

Denise Thomas:
Right. Right. Sorry, I just got to run out real quick. No, you know, I agree. I think that in the end, the protocol is very stylistic. It’s what is going to work for you. What are you going to remember? Is it effective? And then just stick to the. And then you change your protocols as your skillset increases. And there’s a lot of resources out there that you can go through to find the right protocols. You. So simple demo the movement. Tell them what the command is going to be. Tell them what the focus is. Then show them how it all looks. And then you you’re off it. Yeah. It’s simple. We said this at the summit. You know, it’s simple, but simple isn’t easy. And we be we’d be a mess to. To just tell the community that this stuff’s easy now. No one people do things. Yeah.

Fern:
Like, if we were gonna break that down and you guys, we’re gonna leave with something. It’s like, you know, basically tell him or teach him, show them and then coach them and just go through that template as many many, as many times as possible. For everything every piece of it. Progression for every movement for every one a piece. Tell them, show them, coach them and then do it that way over and over.

Denise Thomas:
Just, you know, I’m gonna loook. And then you’re like, I’m a look, a straight legs. When I say go, can you stay in your legs? And that’s really hard to do when you do in a push jerk. You say it, they’re going to think about it.

Fern:
He’s going to try it.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah. They’re gonna try. You’re going to look for it if you see any bending in the legs. When you just give that we say the level two give that body some corrections templates, protocols,.

Fern:
Temples, templates, protocols,.

Denise Thomas:
Temples,.

Fern:
Temples. You know. Simple is not easy. Try to try to. Work your way towards mastery. And you’re never done. And I think those are things. Those are like big concepts. But I think they’re. You could you could dwindle those concepts down to like very, very simple actions, and I think that’s where people miss the mark. And it going back to like the the speech that Nicole gave, like that’s what we need to do as coaches. We need to understand it. Like these really big ideas are really actually executed at the most simple pieces of what it is that we do. And that’s how we get better and that’s how we position ourselves as professionals long term. That’s how, you know, Crossfit, continues to get better. That’s how we continue to get better. That’s our clients continue to get better. And, you know, it’s by doing the little things, doing the basics, doing them really, really well and avoiding the novice’s curse essentially as a coach.

Denise Thomas:
Yeah, I think it’s important To. Give respect, I’ll give attention to I acknowledge sorry. Where you are as a coach in the outside of the gym. Are you OK, you an owner? Are you a full time coach? That’s the only job you do. Are you a part time coach? Because I think that our affiliates do a really great job. I think, you know, they get asked to go to class. They go to the level one. They love it. They do the best they can. And I think it’s really important that we acknowledge that. And I also think when you have a part time trainer that we have to be realistic about how much time you can give to being better as a coach and to not be so hard on yourselves. You know, you guys are doing the best you can, but just have a little bit more preparation, whether it’s five, 10, 15 minutes. And that that alone will elevate the level of your your skill set just a little bit every day.

Denise Thomas:
Small start, small wins. But if you are the head, the owner, the head coach, the full time staff member, the expectation of you is much greater because that is your thing and you can spend dedicated time to it.

Denise Thomas:
And then hopefully this podcast and all the others will help provide you some information how to do that, but just know what you are. And we think you’re great. You just keep going.

Fern:
Cool, you like anything? Carry on any last thing for the listeners. Before we get out of here.

Denise Thomas:
Just that I think that you and Jason, baby Jay are doing a really great thing with this podcast and you pull pulling from people from all kinds of walks of life and it has a lot of value. And I think the best thing that the community can do is continue to reach out to both you guys and ask and tell you what they what, because if they tell you what they want, you’ll find that right person and you’ll bring them on. And that’s how we can continue to share best practices and increase our knowledge. If the community is quiet, we don’t know what they want. It’s like summit we we ask the trainers, what do you want? They told us what they wanted. We create drills around that. And then he added value outside of that. It’s just assumptions. So I think that we should speak up or we should tell the people that have a voice what what we want so that we can get to a better result.

Fern:
I that I could not agree with more. And that was one of the that was one of the major pillars of when we started the podcast, that one of the reasons we wanted to do it was because we have access, like people like Denise, like awesome like James, like some of the best coaches in the world, like we have access to them. So if you guys want something like a let us know what’s really cool is like that’s already starting to happen. We have previous guests or other people who are sending us other people like the number of people that we have lined up here in the next couple weeks that we’re trying to get on. It’s not a short list and some of these are like really, really smart people that we were like, we have the opportunity to talk to you. So I’m looking forward to it. But if you guys have people that you want us to talk to you. If you have topics you want us to discuss. Send them over. We love nothing more than to deep dive into these things and provide value to the guys. So, yeah, I couldn’t agree with more.

Denise Thomas:
You should. You should have somebody in a, you know, an affiliate owner or a head trainer or a part time coach from an affiliate. Come on the show and do like a live Q&A, because I think what happens is we’re out here and we’re given information and we’re given these some of these hypotheticals. We don’t know the scenario. We’re trying to. But if you brought someone on that was like, you know, live in it and really struggling with certain things. The questions that would come from the questions, you would get probably a large part of the community being like, yes, thank you for asking that. That was exactly what I was feeling in that moment. And now this. He or she is asking Jason and this is exactly what I want. That’s would be pretty cool.

Fern:
We’ll try to dial that up on probably . We’ll try to bring somebody on and do like we’ll probably have to do like a Facebook live so that people can interact on their on and do it there. But that would be like a really cool thing to do there. So we’ll do it. We will dial it up and make it happen. Dt As always, it’s a pleasure.

Denise Thomas:
Jf , Jay I a question really quick. Are you trying to grow a man bun?

Fern:
I’m not trying to grow a man bun. I. Kind of do have happened kind of.

Denise Thomas:
Do you have one now?

Fern:
No, My hair’s not up. So full disclosure, I did get some comments and one of the Instagram posts lately about my hair length and I’m I’m not really sure how I feel about it. So anybody thinks I’m feeling cool about this long hair. I’m very indifferent about it. I don’t know yet.

Denise Thomas:
I like it. It’s hard for me to give you compliments, but I like.

Fern:
I don’t know, why. There’s a lot good going on over here.

Denise Thomas:
There’s a lot a good going on. There’s a lot there’s a lot of good and a lot of good going on. All right. Well,.

Fern:
Awesome. Thank you, ma’am. If you guys need to hit up d.t again, is it? What’s your Instagram D? Denise said something 7. I forgot. Polls closed and Denton Thomas. Seven.

Denise Thomas:
Seven. Yeah.

Fern:
And then DT, lesson plans that are up. And always if you guys got questions, hit us up and we’ll see you next time.

Denise Thomas:
All right. Thanks, Jay.

Yup. See ya!

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