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122. Is Your Box Fit?

122. Is Your Box Fit?

Today listeners, you are in for a Fern Friday special treat! Fern is going solo with is own thesis about how fit is your box?- Now Fern isn’t talking about if you would have won the affiliate cup, back when that was things. He discusses how “fit” is your business. As Crossfit, we like to be about to have metrics that are measurable, compared and retested. If we see a weakness in ourselves or our athletes we’d make a plan to fix, Fern idea is why aren’t we doing that for our business too? Meaning there’s a weakness in our business, then make a plan to fix, instead of sticking out head in the sand about. Fern’s trying to move away from the idea that because a box has been open longer or has more member that means it’s successful. When in reality these’s gyms is struggling to keep the light. Fern’s very good at breaking down the aspect into Crossfit metaphors. 

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Fern:
All right, everybody, welcome back to the best out of their day Fern here going to do something a little bit different today. I am going to go solo. Just because it’s been something I’ve been wanting to do and give to you guys. And it’s not the first time I put this out. I’ve done this on a YouTube channel that I it’s not been something I’ve been keeping up with for a while, just has been busy. But I’m going to kind of give you guys my thesis as far as, you know what, I think long term, what hell is going to help people create super healthy Crossfit, gyms or micro gyms or whatever the hell you think this space is going to be called in the next 20 years and.

Fern:
I think I think maybe I’ve said it on other podcasts, but. My vision for for this podcast and for everything that we do best out of their day is. Is really to eradicate excuses. So I want to expose the greater community to best business practices, best coaching practices, best ideas, and and I’m not insinuating in any way, shape or form that those are my ideas. This what I’m about to give you guys is my idea or it’s my concept. It’s my thesis. This is how I look at my business.

Fern:
And really the goal with what we’re doing is to try to break beliefs, break beliefs that like you can only run a business one way, that you can only do it with, you know, this type of programming or this social media practice and. It’s a fairly simple concept concept, and if you do Crossfit, and if you’ve been doing this for any amount of time, you’re going to get it. And once I explain this to you, you’re not going to be able to unknow it, which is really the point, which is the idea to try to hammer home. And like I want people when I’m when I die to walk away with this. You can’t unknow this. And one of the things that I think is incredibly. Powerful about the Crossfit, space, is the is the community right? And I think if we really start to evaluate things, we can see that a lot and a lot of instances, their strengths can also be simultaneously their greatest weaknesses. And I think I may have references in previous podcasts, but when it comes to gym ownership, I think the community, which is largely what makes the vast majority of Crossfit, gyms great, is also the business owners of greatest weakness. Now, hear me out on this. What I mean by that is we create a and we foster these really, really tight relationships and we really foster these these really, really tight communities. And eventually that leads to more so now than it did five or six years ago.

Fern:
To be very honest with you, which is a little strange, I still haven’t been able to unpack that and figure out why. But we get so entrenched in our own community that most of us we fail to get outside of our community. We fail to acknowledge it. There’s somebody down the street who could be doing it better than us and that we should be open to those ideas. And not only should be open to those ideas, we should adopt those ideas, because at the end of the day, just like Crossfit, and programming, we should all be married to results. Not that we really love. You know, this one particular thing about our gym, like we should be married to the results and the results only if we’re talking about programming. We’re talking about anything within Crossfit,. You guys know that we love observable, measurable, repeatable. It is what makes Crossfit, what it is. It is. It is what makes it an empirical, scientifically based program, because that’s all we’re worried about is. Who’s fitter, who? Who produce the most power, who has the most intensity? And if we are not looking at our athletes and asking ourselves, you know, are they getting stronger? Are the times getting faster? Are the developing skills that they didn’t otherwise have? Then we’re probably doing them, them and ourselves a disservice. And that’s a perfect segue way into what I want to talk about, which is.

Fern:
When I talk to him most gyms and when I talk to gym owners and when I talk to people in the community, there’s this really, really weird almost. Ignorance like willful ignorance to two deep dive into the business. And I can say that because that was me for a very, very long time. And I’m not in any way suggesting that I have all the answers that I know at all. Large I consider myself as a business owner as like better than most, but far worse than a lot. And that’s simply based on some metrics. Right. You know, so observable metrics, measurable metrics based on what is out there with regard to small businesses. So we know that 80 percent of small businesses will fail within the first five years. And then something to the tune of 50 to 60 of those businesses that make it past five years will fail in the following five years. So to make the 10 year mark puts you in something to the tune of like the 90 percentile of of business owners that are that are still functioning at the 10 year mark. And this doesn’t even see. This is not even to suggest that your thriving 10 year mark you just simply means that you are still alive. Like you say, you still have a business that is intact and operating in some way, shape or form. So in no way does that mean it’s a successful business. And a lot of what I want to get away with or get away from.

Fern:
Is this idea that this gym has however many members means it’s successful or it’s been open for this long. It means a successful like neither one of those determined or in any way define what makes a successful business. So here’s my thesis. If I was to ask you who’s fitter? Me or you we would immediately start to rattle off some numbers. We would start to rattle off fran time deadlift back squat mile run, how many handstand push ups you can do it. What was your open scores for twenty point five or twenty or the year 2020. Right. Going into this season that we just finished, like we would have all of these very, very defined metrics. And at the end of the day like there would be no question one of us would be fitter, there would be, you know, he or she who performs statistically best across all of these tasks that we pull out of the hopper like we talked about in the level one would be the fittest and. We all understand that. Look, that’s it’s not even debatable anymore. Like, everybody just grasp that concept and understands it. And even if we lie to ourselves or we lie to other people, we can’t lie to ourselves. Even if we tell people like these are our numbers, we know where our weaknesses lie. We know what we don’t want to see come out of the hopper.

Fern:
We know we don’t like double unders or muscle ups or strict Pull-Ups or handstand walking or whatever that is. That thing is for you. And my contention is because we have that concept and it is so just deeply entrenched in the Crossfit, community, we should take that model of balance and apply it to business. So if we’re thinking about the three modalities within Crossfit,, we all know that it’s money, structural gymnastics, Ramana, structural metabolic conditioning, gymnastics and weightlifting. I don’t feel the need to define those three things. Most of you know what they are. But if you don’t, you could look them up really quickly and why in. And we would. It could easily take an athlete. Line up their metrics and everything they do would fall in one of those three categories, monov structural about conditioning, weightlifting or gymnastics or weightlifting and gymnastics, and we would easily be able to identify where this athlete per say, would be weak, right? We would say, OK, there 5k time is too slow or there deadlift is really, really low and we do what we do. What would you do if you had that? You would immediately start to devise a plan to shore up those weaknesses and when it comes to training. Everybody understands that, but for whatever reason, we all like to stick our heads in the sand when it comes to business and just, you know, hang your hat on like the coaching is good or we have a great community.

Fern:
And I have a different idea to pitch to all of you, which is why don’t we start looking at our gyms exactly the same way we start looking at athletes because we know there’s no shortage of coverage on Crossfit, games athletes. And we do this just grand analysis of each athlete by their previous year’s time, as in what their current metrics are and how they’ve performed in the past. Why don’t we apply that same critical thinking to our gyms? Like why can’t we use those same three models of mono structured mirrorball conditioning, gymnastics and weightlifting on the gym and ask ourselves the question, how fit is your gym? And I’m gonna break this down for you guys. And really kind of maybe even painful detail. But again, the point is that you can’t unknow it and you can’t and you will. And my hope is that you will never look at your gym the same. And you’ll understand immediately by just being in the gym or knowing what your bias towards where you need to start putting your focus. So if I’m looking at those three Monov structural, will they line up pretty well based on like how the business runs? So if I look at my structural metabolic conditioning, we all know that that is the base for all training. Right? If I have no cardiorespiratory endurance. I’m really going to struggle at anything that I’m going to partake in, whether it’s gymnastics, because like as the volume gets higher, as the positions get more complex, like I’m going to need a certain amount of conditioning with regard to that.

Fern:
And same thing in weightlifting. You know, as we go past like, you know, twos and threes and into fives and sevens or as the load gets heavier like met the the cardiovascular endurance is a thing. And it is is what fuels everything else within our fitness that we’re trying to train like it is the thing that is everything is built on. And if we add in the reason. That it falls in line here, what about to talk about it, because it’s not the sexy stuff, like nobody wants to do intervals on the track. Nobody wants to sit on the roller for 45 minutes. Nobody wants to get, you know, go back and forth between the Air Runner and the assault bike and work on technique and holding, you know, a specific APM like. But we do know that that is the thing that has massive carry over and allows me to start stacking other skills and more volume onto my training protocol in order to be a fitter athlete. And in the business like that is the operations of the business. That is the financials. That is things like your standard operating procedures. That is things like what is your PNL and your balance sheet look like? Do you have a schedule for coaches in class and like protocols for how people swap classes? Do you have jobs and roles listed? What like what are those jobs like? Are they drawn out line item by line item? You know, do you have a three month plan, a six month plan, a one year plan? A five year plan? Do you have a retention plan that you can execute on a daily or weekly or monthly basis? Do you have monthly meetings that you have with your staff about whatever is going on in the gym? Do you have any of those things in place? And the beauty of all of those things is like they’re they’re very measurable, like either you have them or you don’t.

Fern:
Right. So we could just go down. And that’s not an exhaustive list, but that is quite a lot of things that, again, you can lie to me, but you can’t lie to yourself about those things. Are they in place or do I have S.O.P. That are actually how we operate our business? Or do I have a binder sitting on my shelf so that I can feel good about having S&Ps if you crack that thing open? Is is it actually how you operate your business? You know, if you haven’t read Clockwork by Michael my chalo, it’s it’s a fantastic book and I’ll give you the synopsis of it in five seconds, which is like videotape. Everything that you do if you have functions within Wodfity or Zen planner or mind body on line or push press or sugar water, whatever it is the hell that is that you use and you haven’t done screen capture videos of all of those functions and categorize them by transaction, meaning, you know, this is how you create a membership.

Fern:
This is how you fill out a waiver. This is how you share payment information. This is how you setup a hold or cancellation. This is how you input the WOD into Wodfity Like if you don’t have all of that in place and like literally either written in written word or in video format, then you don’t have S&Ps because I don’t have the ability to just drop dead right now. And then somebody walk in and either be able to listen to or read the human language and take over my business. And it goes the same. We can just go down the line like what is the procedure for scheduling in your business? Like how? This is how the daily operations run. How do people come in? And, you know, what is the protocol office? A random person walks in your gym while you’re coaching class and there happens to be no other staff involved. You know, like all of these things matter and they are the thing that allow you to start getting into actual training. If you were an athlete, if we think about it that way. Like if I if I don’t have the ability to to walk one mile without stopping it, it’s really difficult to start building any sort of base on top of that.

Fern:
Like I need is some sort of base to start building other skills on top of other things, like do you get a comfy PNL? Do you even have an accountant? Right. What is your balance sheet say? Do you run? Do you know off the top of your head? What is your profit margin? You know, jobs and roles listed like who’s in charge of what is it written? Does everybody understand what those are? You have coach contracts in place. You know, what is the retention plan for outreach for members who have either left or who or haven’t come in and two weeks like these are all the things that are if not in written form. These are S.O.P. Is that your business is built on? Right. And again, I use these because like none of that shit is sexy. Nobody wants to do those things. Like there’s there’s. There are certain people that like really get their rocks off on doing that stuff. But it’s generally not the coach. It’s generally not the person who’s good on the floor. It’s generally not. Most of us who fall in the category of like a business owner who turned, you know, passion into entrepreneurship. So think of that as like that’s your operations money, structural metabolic conditioning is the operations of your business. Like which one of those things are you not good at? Do you not have a good hold on.

Fern:
Which one of those things would would make the biggest impact on your training, if you will, in air quotes if you addressed it immediately? Right. And again, we like to put our heads in the sand because maybe I don’t know a lot about financials. Maybe. Maybe. Hey, listen. Full disclosure. Maybe you’re one of those people who never looks at the bank account because you’re afraid of what the fucking balance is like. I’ve been there on numerous occasions and that is default mechanism. What’s your what your profit margin? I don’t know. I don’t like to look at it because it basically just makes me depressed when I find out that it’s negative 1 percent and then I’m running a loss every year. You know, stuff like that. So that’s the modest actual mirrorball conditioning. And against everything that falls in there are those things that are the base that are musts. They are necessities in order to run a business and do it well. Moving from there, going to gymnastics, you know, gymnastics is you know, if we think about gymnastics in a training in a training sense, we know that the reality is gymnastics. If we spend the appropriate amount of time on it, it probably has the biggest bang for your buck with regard to transfer, you know, like being able to get into the more complex gymnastics, gymnastics stuff like plunges, El Sit’s, you know, a pressed to handstand all of these things that like all of us would want to do, but really like the amount of time and agony that it’s going to take us to start to really get good at that stuff.

Fern:
Like most of us just don’t want to do that because it sucks and it involves an incredible amount of failure along the way because you have to start with a one second l sit before you’re ever going to do 30 seconds into something that might potentially look like three minutes for an LSA. That’s the stuff that everybody knows they should be working on. It’s the stuff that devastates people every single year in the open because they can’t do muscle ups, they can’t walk on their hands, they can’t do handstand push ups because they’re not spending the time doing the small things, which is spending. I don’t know any amount of time, three to four minutes a week in a handstand, not doing anything, just kicking up onto the wall or take a step back. Working on the ability to kick up into a handstand. We avoid those things because they’re not fun. We’re generally not good at them. And a lot of us don’t even know where to start because gymnastics is fairly complicated and we’re not even aware because we haven’t done a deep dive into gymnastics. Generally, if I want a skill Coach Glassman talked about this at the trainer summit in gymnastics. I start backwards. I don’t start at the end state.

Fern:
Excuse me. I started the instating work backwards from there. Like if you want to press the handstand, you would start from the handstand and work on lowering yourself into the position which is working on the opposite of what we think we should work on. Most of us work from the floor trying to get into the top position when actually what we should do is show control on a handstand and then show controlled descent. And then what he was explaining in there was that once I do that, once I can lower myself from a control position in a handstand into basically the floor position or seated position, you basically have all the skills and the strength to just reverse and go the other direction. But we don’t want to put in the time because it’s incredibly difficult that the gymnastics that is marketing. Right. We all know that it has incredible R-N.Y. But none of us want to put in the time to watch one hundred hours of Facebook ad videos on YouTube or spend, I don’t know, three months dicking around and Facebook ads manager RFIG like feeling like you have no idea what’s going on. Like not understanding the difference between reach and branding and conversion and leads and Нundred like getting overwhelmed with all its stuff and like not understanding the difference between front end and back end marketing. Like what is the difference between those two? What is the difference between a marketing and branding? How much content? Am I creating? Do you have a social media calendar? Are there posts that are scheduled out for the next month that have a specific theme to them? What is the difference between your Instagram feed and your Facebook feed? Is it just a crosspost or you’re doing different content on both of them? Do you understand how long form plays on Facebook versus long form on Instagram and which ones should have better pictures or where does video index better? How did the ads work differently on Instagram when they do on Facebook? Does your gym run a podcast? Where are you putting that podcast? Where are you repurposing? A lot of different content.

Fern:
Are you doing blogs on your Web site or is your web site the thing that you host your your workout on? Like it’s 2007? Are you running paid ads? If I look at your it’s your social media feed. Is it full of. Asks. Are you giving versus taking? And that’s another one of my thesis is like what you should be doing on Instagram, which is primarily giving which should be giving education, entertainment or inspiration. Ninety nine percent of the time. And then you have the the right to ask in a sales format. These are the things that we have to spend time on. And these are the things that actually bring new revenue into the business. And if we’re talking about like front end versus back in there, also the things that maximize customer value long term within the business as well.

Fern:
You know, like understanding, like what is the lifetime value of a client? And then what is my cost of acquisition per client if I’m running a paid ad? Like, how does all that factor in? How do we determine what my ad spend should be? You know, that’s that’s a bleed over from the operations out of the money structural side into the marketing or the gymnastic side, because there’s carry to a boat like I need to have a procedure to understand, like what should the budget be to move over towards the paid ad spend? And if you haven’t listened to our second interview with Stuber Howard from what the fuck, Jim? Talk like we talk about that he spends 30 percent of lost revenue, meaning of. I had six members leave this month, filled out cancellations, and I have a 30 day cancellation notification policy in my gym that I’m going to lose that that money in something between 30 to 60 days depending on when they filled it out. I’m going to take 30 percent of that in a one month window and I’m gonna spend it on ad spend to try to get that back. Right. So if arbitrarily, if you lose a thousand bucks, you know, over the next 60 days in cancellations, regardless of what you’re bringing in. I want to replace that. I’m going to spend three hundred and thirty dollars on Facebook ads moving forward.

Fern:
That is the stuff we need to. And then what should that ad look like? What should the creative look like? What should the copy look like? Should it be video? Should it be? Should it be picture? Should I have like a revolving ad where it has like it’s going back and forth between video and audio. So there are video and pictures that I can figure out which one of those is performing best and then kill the other one. Like this is the stuff that nobody wants to do because it is incredibly overwhelming and most of us are educated enough to make a good decision on about who to outsource it to. Like I give it to somebody who says they’re good at it, but I don’t know enough about it to check that person to see if what they’re actually doing is good. I’m just paying them and they’re bringing me leads potentially, you know, or they’re bringing me leads that are overpriced. But I don’t know any better because I haven’t done that. I haven’t done the time to figure that stuff out. You know, so gymnastics is marketing, right? It’s not sexy, it’s incredibly overwhelming to start dipping your toes into the marketing and and the sales aspect of a business, particularly if it’s not your skill set, because it’s not for most of us. Most of us are like nerding out on training, you know, so we have to figure out at least to get competent in it.

Fern:
You’re not to be great at it, but you need to be copied. It can’t be the thing that comes up and devastates the open. Maybe you just can’t string 30 muscle lips together, but you can do 30 in four minutes. Right. Versus a minute and a half. You know, that doesn’t mean you’re the world’s greatest gymnast, but it does mean that you’re somewhat competent in that skill. And that is where most of us need to try to move towards when it comes to marketing and gymnastics. Like, I just don’t want to be really, really shitty at it. I want to be like pretty good at it, but not an Olympic, not an Olympian. And then the last one. Right. Which is weightlifting. Right. So we have them on a structural we have gym asking, then weightlifting. And I put coaching and weightlifting because this is how I feel the vast majority of the CrossFit community operates, which is everybody thinks they’re good at weightlifting. We see a lot of weightlifting on Instagram. But nobody’s really that good at it. You know, there’s a handful that are really exceptional weightlifting. The rest of us just like to show it because it’s cool. And that’s coaching, right? Nobody’s. The vast majority of us are not really that good at it. Right. We’re all just kind of really playing around with it, but not really deep diving into the skill that is weightlifting, not doing a year of just weightlifting.

Fern:
So that I can, you know, clean and jerk, you know, almost two times my body weight. Right. Which would be an incredible feat for the vast majority of us. Right. Or just get really good at the snatch and be able to sots press, you know, a significant amount of weight, things like that. Everybody likes to hang their hat on the coaching. And that’s tough because largely, you know, until I kind of give you some things to look at is largely it’s an abstract thought. And the people hang their hat on. Coaching is predicated any ending I’ve talked about this before is predicated on the false assumption that the person who’s coming into your gym to purchase your service. Knows what the hell that looks like, an Uncle Jenny, Uncle Bob. Not Uncle Ginny. It could be Uncle Ginny these days, who knows? But Uncle Bob who comes in, doesn’t know that. Like he’s not a Crossfit, coach. He doesn’t know the difference. He’s never done Olympic weightlifting. He doesn’t care. He just heard this is cool. And once they get fit. Yeah, we’ve they don’t know if if you’re a good coach, even if you have no idea what the difference between your elbow and your knee is. Right. We have to get past that stop, hang their hat on coaching. We need to develop coaching, but we can’t hang your hat on it because it’s this abstract thing that largely is subjective, largely subjective.

Fern:
Now I can measure it. All right. So coaching, what is your coach development program look like? How many credentials do your does your coaching staff hold? Right. How many programs are you running in your gym? Is there. Is there a continuing education plan within your within your program? And then if we’re gonna really get into it, like, are you writing lesson plans and are you getting evaluations on the lesson plans? So largely it is an abstract thought to be like it’s a great coach, but we can absolutely measure it. Like, can you write a lesson plan that is well thought out, has logic, has flow, takes into account all the things that need to be taking account in a class and then can you execute it? It’s cool if you can write a lesson plan, but execute that lesson plan is an entirely different concept altogether. And that is something that many, many, many, many, many people are not very good at. And I can tell you that. And it’s not because people don’t want to be good at it’s because largely when it comes to coaching, people don’t know what they don’t know. They’re not seeking out the experts in their particular field. In weightlifting, in running and swimming and rowing and gymnastics and stealing that information and then slowly figuring out different ways to effectively sprinkle that into your lesson plan so that at the end of the day, we can do the three things and that 60 minute timeframe and make it the best hour people’s day, which is educate, inspire and entertain.

Fern:
And when somebody walks in and it looks your class, they say, listen, I don’t know how the hell you did that, but it was really, really fun. There was an incredible amount of information disseminated in that 60 minutes and it was on time. Oh, you know what? And people got a good workout in. That is the mark of a really, really effective coach. And there are a lot of things behind people that are really, really effective coaches that look like the things that I listed earlier, which is like there is a coach development plan. They do have credentials whether they are at B. You know, in the U. At the university level or it’s just a list of extensive, you know, other credentials that they have, whether it’s, you know, like a CSI. Yes. Or exos or exos or OpEx or USA weightlifting or Crossfit, specialty courses or whatever the hell else it is that you want to get into. It’s Crossfit, kids courses, you know, brand X like, oh, there’s there’s infinite number of things that we could get into. But the point is that if somebody has a resumé, it at least tells me something like, you know, absent of me finding out if the person’s an asshole, like at least tells me that they’re somewhat educated. Now, that doesn’t mean that they can execute in a real time practical scenario, their skill set.

Fern:
You know, and educate, inspire and entertain. But it does tell me that they have some education and have some degree of expertise tucked in their back pocket. Now, again, the difference between a great coach and a good coach or a mediocre coach is the ability to take all the information. Dumb it down. Have that transmitters of information to the individual that I’m working with and have them not feel like a dummy, you know? Can I effectively take that information and communicate it to other people in a sense that they feel like, oh, they’re just talking to me like a regular person. And that is the really, really good, true, accurate mark of an effective coach is the ability to to make that happen. You know, so again, if I’m looking at evaluating my German, this is what I suggest you do and be honest with you. Like it doesn’t take a ton of time. Like, the reality is, if I give you this this concept, like it’s not going to take you very long to figure out what it is that you’re bad at. Because I’ve talked to a lot of gym owners and I’ve been all of them at some point my development and still am to some extent. You know which one of these are bad? Because it’s probably the one that you do almost none of. Right. Whether it’s them on a structural right, which is the operations or the systems, whether it’s the gymnastics, which is the marketing or the sales or whether it’s the weight lifting, which is the coaching or your service.

Fern:
Right. So, Monov, structural gymnastics, weightlifting, sales systems service. That’s how I want you guys to look at it, because again, the point is for you to look at this in a very objective manner, just like you would an athlete. Because now when we’re struggling with our business, it’s not an it’s not a question of like like what should we start working on? What is the thing that we’re not very good at? You know, if each one of you who’s listening to this immediately knows if you wanted to be the fittest version of you humanly possible, where would you start? You would immediately know what that was. And there’s probably a number of reasons or excuses on why you’re not working on that thing, which is fine. Nobody’s faulting you for that. And I’m not judging anybody for that. I just want people to stop saying we’re randomly with nothing to back it up. You like all this? It’s a good business. It’s a successful business. Based on what? What are the metrics that we’re looking at? And that is what I really, really want to start digging into. And that’s the way I want you to look at your gym, because that is what allows us all, specifically the Crossfit, community to thrive moving forward.

Fern:
When we stop being so romantic about Crossfit, and that, you know, simply having a methodology is going to carry me into the future. And we start looking at our businesses the same way we look at Crossfit, athletes, which is, you know, what is their ability to thrive in a more structural mirrorball conditioning environment? What is their gymnastic skill set? What is their ability to move heavy loads and do so efficiently? And then I take that idea and I laid on top my business, say, hey, what are the systems within this business to that that allow it to operate efficiently and smoothly with people at different seats in the business? And then what is their ability to do sales both front end and back in? Like, am I doing sales with my current members or my only thinking about bringing new people in the door? And do I have the ability to turn on that faucet for a new sales at will and bring in 30 to 40 minute members if the in the event that I needed to. I’m not suggesting that you do that. I think that’s largely about idea. But you should at least have the skills that I could do it if I wanted to is really a good place to be. And then the coaching. Am I continuing to develop the coaches and myself and the staff to have a good resumé to continue to provide better service so that when people come in. It is absolutely the best hour of their day.

Fern:
So that’s it. That’s my thesis, guys. The really the big thing I want you guys to take away from this is really just look at your gym objectively.

Fern:
Look at it from those three pillars or those three modalities within Crossfit, them on a structural mirrorball conditioning, the gymnastics and the weightlifting, and then start looking your gym that way and ask yourself, how fit is my gym?

Fern:
I hope this helps, guys, if you have questions. Hit me up. Going to do this brain dump. It’s been something that’s been on my mind for a while. So I hope you enjoyed it. Hit us up BSR of their day. If you got questions, we get some cool things coming. Programming for Jim’s. Our mentor program and we got an online course or a building, so cool stuff coming for you guys in the next six months. Our guys have a good one.

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