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123. Karl Eagleman | Whiteboard Daily

123. Karl Eagleman | Whiteboard Daily

On today’s episode Jason Ackerman chats with the  Karl Eagleman, you may know him better by his Instagram @whiteboard_daily. He’s the man behind those amazing coaching diagrams and the new whiteboard daily glossary. The glossary is an encyclopedia for coaches from cues, to movement patterns and everything in-between. They discuss how and why Karl started this all and some of his future plans. But really it’s all about wanting to help coaches have better and in-depth resources on specific movements.  It’s really easy to see that Karl just getting started and that his man will be providing a lot of value and resources for the community. So make sure you are following him. – @whiteboard_daily


Timestamps:

(3:23) How it all started?
(17:05) The ideas for content
(21:18) The art or the knowledge

Social: 

@whiteboard_daily 
@karleagleman

Website

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Jason Ackerman:
All right. So welcome back to the best hour of their day. Thanks for joining us, Karl. You are in the garage in cold weather I assume and you're a tire. Where are you located right now?

Karl Eagleman:
I'm in Greenwood, Indiana, just south of Indianapolis, Indiana. Indiana is home to me. I'm not in the garage because this is where I pack orders for whiteboard daily posters. I figured that I would just knocked it out the same time while I'm out here. So I'm very happy to be here.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, you know, give me a little bit of the tour. Granted, the listeners might not see this. I see a car, but let me see the post you're talking about.

Karl Eagleman:
The posters are all right here. This is like the wrapping paper. These are all of the tubes that I pack, everything. I got my printer over here where I print. Everything's on Shopify. I'm not sure if you have shop if I use shop Shopify, but it's like it's amazing. Shopify, if I really just it has everything at your disposal, so, you know, pack printing slips, a pack a dollar, a postage, everything like right here in this corner of my garage. And I've learned so much in the past six months, really. So I could talk about a lot of stuff, but I will save that for later.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, yes. So let's dive into it. First of all, the life of an entrepreneur working out of his garage. You know, nearly 10 o'clock at night in Indiana. Everyone wants to, you know, be an entrepreneur until it's time to do entrepreneurial type things.

Karl Eagleman:
Yeah, that's very true. It's the good thing about the entrepreneurial life, I think, is that you find that the one thing that you love to do and you realize like it's not work, it's just fun. Like I think about all the time that I spend drawing whiteboards, doing posters, doing research for coaching cues like just trying to find good content to share with other people, you know. And now that I'm in like this world, I think about like, man, what what would I do with my life? What I do with us time. If I wasn't doing this and I just love it, it's a passion of mine. And I'm so thankful to have this platform to share good quality coaching content with other people.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, it's like Wayne Gretzky once said. Find a job you love and you'll never work a day in your life. I don't know. That was Wayne Gretzky, but someone somewhere like Ben Franklin or something. But it's really cool that you do that. And that's really what I want to talk to you about. You know, you've got this tremendous, I'm going to say, social media presence, but it's far bigger than that. Called Whiteboard daily. And I want to hear all about how that got started. I somehow got turned on to it a long time ago. And then you and I started connecting. But if you don't already check it out, maybe as you're listening this head over to Karl's Instagram, it's whiteboard_daily. And talk to me a little bit how that got started. You're clearly an artist, but I think. It wouldn't be what it is today if you were just a good artist. You also have a good understanding of the body. So let's let's dive into all of that. What what was day one? When did you start your first artistic expression on a whiteboard?

Karl Eagleman:
So. Well, they weren't, for instance. For what we're dealing, day went for like just kind of drawing stuff.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, let's talk about that. Let's dig deep into the childhood memories. Let's get a let's get deep find out what type of mom she you've got going on. Like all of us settle on. Well, were you always artistic?

Karl Eagleman:
Yeah. Well, it's funny that you say mom. She's because our parents. I'm the oldest of three. And my mom, especially my mom, she really promoted and encouraged art. And she's an artist now. She. My my parents never enjoyed hired life and they've taken all of the funds that they've saved from buying groceries for three large growing boys, and they've turned it in and they've built a beautiful studio out in the woods that they live in Broward County, Indiana, which is very rural. But it's a studio for my mom to do watercolor painting. She's always been an artist. My middle brother, he is he's an industrial designer. He's extremely artistic. Eric Eagleman. He makes a living drawing. And so there's no question. Also, my youngest brother, two extremely artistic. So it definitely runs in our in our family. And I never realized that, you know, drawing stick figures and motion and movement sequences on a whiteboard is, I guess, considered an art. But I'm just honored to be able to to use the skills that I've gained along the years and the knowledge that I've picked up from coaching and also just being an Crossfit, for 12, 13 years to share the good stuff with the people.

Jason Ackerman:
So. So when did you realize that this talent you have as an artist could lend itself to the whiteboard as well?

Karl Eagleman:
So I think it all kind of started. So I'll give you a just a really brief, a brief background on me. I play basketball in college. I graduated from Bellarmine University in Louisville, Kentucky, and I graduate with communications degree primarily because I don't I don't mind getting front of people and talking. It's fine for me. A little while past that, I worked for some marketing agencies. I never really kind of found my niche for that. In 2006, I decided to go back to school and I got a degree. I got a teaching certification to teach physical education because I've always been an athlete. I was loved teaching movement to other people. It's something that kind of picked up very easily. I wanted to, you know, kind of pursue those like you. Let's give that a try.

Karl Eagleman:
And so I I oh, we end up only teaching for one year out in Oakland, California. And it was actually it was exactly that time I was out in Oakland that I was really getting into Crossfit,. And that was back in 2007. I was really well. I first got to learn about Crossfit, in 2000, I guess 2007.

Jason Ackerman:
Ypu've been in the game awhile.

Karl Eagleman:
Well, yeah, it's I learned first about it with that movie 300 came out. And I think even if you've been in the game for a while too, you know exactly what I'm talking about. That's what the.

Jason Ackerman:
Windsheild wipers and all that good stuff that we us to do in the 300 workout.

Karl Eagleman:
The 300 workout. Yeah. And so I learned about Mach twice. I learned about Jim Jones in Salt Lake City, and I learned how he was, I guess, kind of a studio. He was a student, Greg Glassman. So I started to learn about Crossfit, and all of this like functional training. Just it was like, wow, like. Like I. Up until up. When I was boom, it was Jim that just kind of like carried my jug of water with me in the back in BI's and chest and Tris and legs. And I had been doing that for so long. That kind of you know, when you're doing that stupid stuff, you're like in the gym for like an hour and a half. But you really feel like you're not that athletic. Like, I was like man wins last time. I actually just, like, sprinted up a hill or ran like you just you're used to doing very, you know, fixed like single joint exercises and stuff. And I was like, this is not this is not I I want to be spending my time. 20 one I started to learn about Crossfit, dabbled a little bit, ended up moving out to Berkeley or Oakland, California. And ironically, that's I was working out at the Berkeley Rec sports facility, Berkeley RCF. And I noticed a guy and a girl over in the corner doing butterfly pull ups on a rig. And again, let me remind you, this is two thousand seven people doing butterfly pull ups and the kipping pull ups regardless, like no one was doing that stuff back then. And it turned out it was Sabai Matosevic and he.

Jason Ackerman:
Wow, that's so cool.

Karl Eagleman:
Yeah. He and I, we just kind of hit it off and we started to kind of work out together. We there was also a track there's a dirt track off of Hopkins Street in Oakland or knows still Berkeley. But he would he would get his he would get his video gear. And Kerry, I would track Kerry's last name back in the days that surviving career. I think about later on. But anyway, great guys, obviously. And he would video of me doing some workouts. And so I got the moniker Tall Karl. So if you if you remember any videos back in the day on the dot com page of Tall Karl, there's talk Karl doing double unders there. There's talk Karl doing the DLF Burpee workout anyway. Like, you know, this like the dot.com site was like it's like that's where everybody went in and work out and the day was posted. And so I remember the first time I got a video posted on the dot com CentOS like, holy smokes, this is like, amazing.

Jason Ackerman:
It's a big deal. I remember. Yeah, I remember the first time I was featured on dot com. And, you know, it's like you're a celebrity.

Karl Eagleman:
Yeah. You're a celebrity because that's and you know, for our for the Crossfit, is as it grows, you know, back in the day it's smaller and and everyone like knows who you are. Anyway that was just no it was a trip. And so I ended up just kind of going full bore into Crossfit,. I got my eye level one actually at the ranch and aromas in 2009 and March of 2009 and you know, met. And that was with you? I met Castro. That was back with Freddy Camacho. Julia Gentry, Adrian barzman, Pat Barber. All of those guys were like they were starting with trivia. Those were the guys that were like doing the course clip. It was out there. Neal Maddox was in my class with me. It was just I knew that was something special at the time. But now I look back, I'm like, man, I'm just like, so thankful to have those experiences. This is back when the ranch was like, obviously before it went through like all the renovations that it has now. But anyway. So and then I don't know if I can keep it going, but it kind of give my history here about want to talk too much? You just keep on going.

Karl Eagleman:
No, you know, it's just really interesting to hear. And I love hearing from people that were around back in the day because so many people that are probably listened to this podcast, you know, this day and age, you Google Crossfit,, there's 20 boxes even go to it. Back then, it wasn't like that. It's the same thing I learned how to do. Crossfit, by myself in a global gym watching Crossfit, that I'm every day seeing people that we've had on the podcast like Greg Ahmanson. And you know, you mentioned Freddy Camacho and Adrian barzman and yeah, I remember all the videos with seven. So, you know, that's your introduction and you're doing great and you're moving forward. But still, the question is, at what point did you realize, hey, I can draw on this whiteboard? So I want to hear kind of when you started to put the whiteboard marker to the whiteboard, so to speak. And then also when you decided to start taking that to social media.

Karl Eagleman:
Okay. Yeah, for sure. So I'm going to kind of fast forward here to an O during a fast forward during that time. I went back to school again. I got my master's in kinesiology because I really enjoy human performance. And I was thinking about going into possibly going into ergonomics or for performance, that sort of thing. And also during that time, I'm kind of. Over here, living in New Zealand for two years, and during that time, I became I was very honored and blessed to take the job as a general manager for Crossfit, Munna in Palmerston North, which is just north of Wellington. So that really was my first dive into actually full time coaching and. You know, all the things that a head coach or a general manager would go through and give gave me really great opportunities, kind of like understand what coaches need as far as good coaching, educational content. So it whiteboard daily. Up until this point, up until 2000, I started the accounts on twenty seventeen of August, August of twenty seventeen. And I just because in my mind I knew I had some good stuff that I wanted to share that I've picked up along the way. And I remember one time I. This is back in. This is pride back in the 2011 or so, I was working out at a place called Force Fitness, and Will Fleming was my coach there. He's a really great Olympic lifter. And I remember he always had some really great coaching keys for me and one of them was down like a rock up like a rocket.

Karl Eagleman:
And it just stuck with me. I was like, whoa, like, that's cool. And then at that moment and I stuck this back in my mind. But at that moment, I was like, oh, my gosh, how cool to be to like have a book where it's just all coaching cuz of like whatever movement there is. And I was like, oh, that is so cool. And like, you just take it back your mind. But that never really left me. I always want to create like some kind of glossary or some kind of like catalog of coaching cues the coaches can use because as you know, like not every coach or not every athlete is going to respond the same way to coaching you. So it's nice to have his arsenal of tons of different ways that you can explain movement to somebody. So, you know, and as time went on, I began to like learn more about the different coaching, cuz there were some along the way. And then I was like, you know what? OK, I'm going to draw some stuff on a board is kind of create a account and see what happens. And so that's why I didn't August of twenty seventeen. I created Whiteboard daily and at the time I really didn't know what I was doing. I didn't really I don't know, I just was like I was posting it kind of start off with just posting like some cues, some kind of rough rudimentary drawings. I would post workouts in a post, inspirational quotes.

Jason Ackerman:
Now if you're so do I don't I haven't scaled back far enough. Do you remember the first post to print out the first?

Karl Eagleman:
Yeah, I do actually, because I never deleted it. The first post that I ever put up was a curious story. I was actually in Toronto, Canada for work and I was in know it's a workout. I think it's called Ramada or something like that. But it's a workout that I actually did in the parking lot of a Ramada. And I was like, I'll just put this up there because it's pretty cool. So here's the deal. If you are if you know anything about Instagram, you know that you're going to find like workouts and inspirational quotes is like a dime a dozen. Like, no, like. And you can find that anywhere. Big deal. Right. And so I was like, yeah, I don't know. I just don't know exactly what I'm doing. So I took a full year off of posting anything. I just like this project. And I started I just didn't want to look at it for well, because I was like, man, I just don't know what exactly where it what direction I want to take. And so I. From August to August, I didn't do anything. And I think June, July in July of twenty eighteen, I was like, OK, I would attack this. And when I got a map out all of my content, I want make like, you know, going to make like a book suggestion on my day.

Karl Eagleman:
I'm going to make a tip on Tuesday. Wednesday I'm going to do now my try to work out again. I'll do like a workout on Wednesday. So I mapped out a full month of content ahead of time and I had a calendar and I would like wrote all of my content like E! Each day ahead of time become like get ready to kind of ramp this thing back up. Well, I did it. I stuck with it and then I noticed that like the stuff the people they love were like the coaching cues. And that's the same stuff that loved to do. So it just kind of fit hand-in-hand. And I remember I was doing this for a while and, you know, it started to grow. And I think pride around the time when I hit. Maybe like 5000 followers or something like that. My wife was like, this is really cool, but like, what do you do, like when you run out of coaching cues or what are you doing? You run out of stuff to say. I was like, well, so far I haven't run out of anything in here. Here we are.

Karl Eagleman:
Fifteen, 14 or 15 months into consistently posting one at least one good piece of content every single day. And as you know, like you just there's so much stuff out there that I got a feeling I can keep it going for a very long time.

Jason Ackerman:
Where do you get this creative? Outlet net, not the outlet mall where where does some of these ideas come from? Now that you have done three hundred and sixty five plus posts, I mean, I agree with you. You'll never run out of cues from the simple ones like knees out to chest up. But you're digging deep on some of these. I mean, if someone goes through your Instagram now, we can talk about, you know, you've got your rolling one about the drive and recovery that you know. And this is great stuff because. So many of these are just overlooked. And I think it's like Fred and I talk about all the time we know them, but the average new coach might not. Certainly the members don't know. I mean, I've told members, you know, these simple cues like let's use that one, for example, of recovery and their mind is blown like, oh, my God, you're the smartest man alive. I'm like, no. I just happen to know a little bit about, you know, a little bit.

Karl Eagleman:
Yeah. Yeah. So it's I. OK. So again, and I know that we're. Because. Because terms I know you know, trust me that you are level four. You've traveled the world teaching level ones and whatever you like. Your knowledge is I bow down to your knowledge,.

Jason Ackerman:
Go on keep talking about that.

Karl Eagleman:
But what I'm talking about is this. It's like like you and I, we both know drive and recovery. OK. On the road, whatever. But you've got to remember, there's a billion people out there that still have no idea where it is. So I look for a full time job. I travel a lot. And when I'm traveling, I know it's good, sound, existential and kind of crazy. But like I look down at all. Whenever I'm in the air flying and look down, I'm like, oh, my gosh.

Karl Eagleman:
There are millions and millions and millions of people out there. And you really realize, like, how many people are there still, though, still need the basic cues that you and I take for granted. And so I'll take some stuff that I feel is just baby steps. And people are like, wow, yeah, that's that's like genius. I'm like, if you think so. But it's just like it's just common coming verbiage that you and I would say and it's I think what it is, is to be able to put it in a different medium rather than having the coach say it or even watching a video of somebody doing it, potentially make it break it down. So simple to like a stick figure on a whiteboard. People are like, OK, like, thank you. That makes sense to me. And I like cheese. I'm just honored to be able to provide a different way for people to consume other information that we might be getting from somebody else.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, I think you're bringing up you're bringing up two really valuable lessons here. One, if you're listening to this and you're a coach. Keep it simple.

Karl Eagleman:
Yes.

Jason Ackerman:
You know, we. Sometimes we forget we're so deep into this and we might get, you know, catch the recovery or triple extension. But your members just need to hear jump or squeeze your butt. You know, Coach Burgner said it great when we had a him on was when one of his girls just said, well, shit, coach, just tell me to jump. Yeah. You know, we tried to make these things so complicated that it's it's really cool to just see that it can be simple and really still touch people. And then in addition to that, you know, when we talk about killing is verbal, there's visual and tactile and like you're doing so well as nailing the people that have now learned best visually. Yeah. Exactly. Because you don't do that a lot at the box. You know, you get verbal cues. You get tactile using. You do some visual cues. But there's a difference, I would say, in that visual cue from like, hey, I'm showing you in front of you. So, hey, no, look at this poster. Look at this picture. And that's going to make sense of the whole other avenue of cueing. Another question about that to you is, do you get more positive feedback about the art or about the knowledge within the art?

Karl Eagleman:
That's a really good question. I think what it is, is that I'm going to say it's equal. I'm going to say it's equal because a lot of times people I don't know.

Karl Eagleman:
I don't know. I think a lot of coaches are extremely appreciative to provide like. Some of the drawings that I put out there, because, you know, they're busy doing A, B and C and they're like, oh, Roomba guys, we were talking about this yesterday. So here's like, remember when I told you to, you know, engage your core or take the book out like that one coast, that one posted yesterday. I know how busy coaches are because I've been one and I still do, coach. And so it's like it's a way for me to be like, listen, I know you're busy, so let me take care of this stuff so you can focus on the other stuff and then you can share this with your people. If it's valuable to same so. I wouldn't necessarily say it's like people like world artwork is so awesome because honestly, I feel like it's just it's just stick figure drawings. It's very simple drawings. It's like people like the simplicity.

Jason Ackerman:
Exactly. I was just about to say this and the fact that you can take stick figures. And make them so educating but also so artistic is really impressive, especially coming from someone like myself who has gotten critiqued for their poor drawing of stick figures on the whiteboard and level one and level two seminars. So it's really cool. What's your favorite one that you've ever done?

Karl Eagleman:
My favorite one that I've ever done. I'm actually I'm looking at the. I did a poster called just recently did a poster called the prospective poster. And what I did is I took the top six posts because I'll do coaching cuz I'll do coaching education. I'll do coaching perspectives. I kind of categorize them into different types of posts. And this is a coaching perspective. I took out took the six best coaching perspective post that I've ever done and there's one that's called You Bully the bar, don't let the bar bully you. And it's a stick figure is like flexing with his foot on a bar. And it makes me think about like how when you are lifting, like it's so easy in your daily life to kind of feel like you're bullied by work or traffic or your bills or whatever. And like lifting Olympic lifting is like your one time when you not only should you, but or not only can you, but you should like be aggressive and you bully the bar. You put the bar in a place. And that was some kind of came to me, you know, when I was coaching, I was like, listen, you got to bully that bar. You got to put it into place. You want it right. And so I drew up that stick figure, and I think that's the first one. The first perspective piece that people really think that they really identified with. And I actually I know they really identify with because at the first time, somebody actually took one of my drawings and they put it on a T-shirt themselves and they sent me a picture of like my picture on a t shirt that they had printed because they may identify with it so much as a. Wow, OK. This is really. And they were like, I think overseas somewhere. And I was like, this is really special to me.

Jason Ackerman:
Leslie Actually, I swear it was that when you decided, hey, I can actually turn this into a business.

Karl Eagleman:
I. OK, so here's the deal. Like I this is my passion and this is like what I love to do and I feel like I'm pretty good at it. And I want to make it a little thing and I want to have money like how you got to monetize it right. You got to like you can't just live off likes.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. One hundred twenty three thousand followers don't pay the bills.

Karl Eagleman:
Right. And so you kind of find ways of of providing opportunity for people to support you. And so I think the first the first thing I did was T-shirts. There's a fund raising platform called Bonfire. And all you do is it's zero overhead. All you have to do is just take a picture, a drawing, and you select the apparel, you select the colors, you select the sizes, all this stuff and even select the price point. And then you just put it out there for people to purchase. And if they want to buy it, they can buy it. And then you just get you get it big. They also take care the drop shipping to particular printing, the drops, shipping, all that stuff, which is enormous. But on the opposite side, because they're doing all that stuff, you get like a super duper small cut, like I might make like three or four bucks per shirt in a shirt sell for like. Twenty seven, thirty bucks or something. So it's like you're not going to be buying groceries with that. But at least it's a start. You know, it's at least it's an opportunity for people to, you know, to support you. Some way somehow. And I remember the first shirt that really took off was the snatch shirt that I did. I did this snatch movement sequence. And me and people just loved it. I was like, this is so cool because I love it. Was like, this is pretty cool to me. Like, I thought I'd take it. And you know what? I need to make this a shirt. And sure enough, I did it and it really just took off. And so thankfully, I took the profit from that. And the profit went straight into the first round of posters that I ever did. And I launched the posters as soon as I was cool because I was able to time the poster launch with me hitting 100K. And so I did like a pre you sale for the first one. People could buy a a snatch poster at a lower price and that helps me fund more poster sales remote more poster purchasing in the future.

Jason Ackerman:
So how do you decide how do you decide which ones you're going to turn into a poster, a T-shirt?

Karl Eagleman:
A lot of it just goes on response. It's nice because Instagram provides like market feedback. Like right there in front of you. If something really is if people really identify with a certain post, you're going to know like right off the bat. And so a lot of times what I'll do is that I will look at the things that I think are cool or post that I think that are provided some good vital value to people. And then I see if they've got a good response from the public. And then if it is, then I make them a poster. So, I mean, I've only got four post shows right now and I do have two or three more in my mind that I just need to take the time to to do that are coming up. They're pretty excited about.

Jason Ackerman:
What are the charge? So all of the posts that you've got there are done on a whiteboard. Yes. And then you take a picture of it. Yes. What changes then to make it Angela poster that you can sell?

Karl Eagleman:
I do some more Photoshop to the picture I take out. You know, I just clean it up and make it look nice and pretty and crisp. Take out a spots and then I send that to the printer and then it looks good from the printers and then they put it on a poster. So it's it's it's a pretty smooth, smooth sequence there. It just takes some clicking and some time to kind of zone out on Photoshop.

Jason Ackerman:
How how long does the average drawing take?

The average drawing takes me. It's so funny. I've got a routine. You know, our kid who's got eight and a half year old son. She's. She's actually far beyond. She's turning nine next month. You know, when she goes to bed and it's kind of quiet in the house, then I'll sit down with my whiteboard and 20 minutes maybe. Here's the deal. Like the larger the audience has grown. It's like I got to make sure that I got good valuable and I've got to make sure the presentation is up there. So recently what I've been doing is that because like I would have some good coaching cues in the back, actually. Today is a perfect example. The one I posted today was a get clean, small clean. And I posted that one well over.

Karl Eagleman:
Well, over a year ago, but it was a really poor drawing and you know how it is like we practice anything, the more you do it, the better you get. And I was like, I got up off the game on that one and I read through it and I got kind of popular today, too.

Jason Ackerman:
So the whiteboard you're drawing on it originally, you probably started on a substantial whiteboard, like in a box. What are you drawing on these days? What's the size of the whiteboard?

Karl Eagleman:
I should go get it for you, but it's it's nothing fancy. And actually the very first whiteboard, so I'll know about you, but like in your box. But I had one is laying around. First off, like members like to write stuff down and you don't like chalk on the mat. And so you get like you go to Lowe's or Home Depot and you take some shower board and you cut it into squares.

Jason Ackerman:
Twelve dollars.

Karl Eagleman:
Yeah. Instead of that. Yeah. And so I had the very first ones. If you look back you might see that they're actually square. And so you know, life like the first. I think all the way. Here's the crazy thing. Prob'ly up until the point I had like fifty thousand followers, every single drawing was done on like a 16 by 16 square shower board.

Jason Ackerman:
And that's all it was like. So small that. Yes, small, just like whiteboard markers. That's all that. And you can also notice on those older ones that there was actually a spot where the shower board had been chunked out. And so that black spot showed up on every single drawing. Way back in the day, you can scroll back backward.

Jason Ackerman:
You might find it. I see now. Thats cool that the reality.

Karl Eagleman:
Right. And so I remember Christmas time last year. You know, mom's like what you want for Christmas. I'm like, man. Anything to help me grow whiteboard_daily more in. So she got me a legit whiteboard. The one I draw now. And it's probably like trying to measure it out. It's like 18 by 24. Yeah. Maybe a little bit bigger.

Jason Ackerman:
It's it's really cool, you know, for the listeners. Go on again. Follow whiteboard on your spa daily, by the way. Well, as whiteboard daily, we've got to do something about that.

Karl Eagleman:
Oh. Oh yeah. Well you have to talk about the later. I don't think I'm not sure if anybody has that on. Maybe they do. But we can talk about copywriting and trademark and because I'm trying to actually get entering that world right now. Again, that is kind of interesting.

Jason Ackerman:
I'm Googling Whiteboard daily and it's someone with 53 followers. Not quite like you're up to so many posts, will they?

Karl Eagleman:
Or underscores kind of who I am nowadays. So.

Jason Ackerman:
You gotta keep guy. You've got your brand now, but. You know, it's really cool, like I was saying to the listeners, go back and kind of search through and it's it's just cool to see. I love seeing entrepreneurs grow and their journey no different than Crossfit,. And you can see it. I mean, you go you can see how it went from, hey, I just throw up a workout or I put a quote to like really well-thought out pictures. How often are you are erasing on these pictures?

Karl Eagleman:
The more. Well, I don't know man,.

Jason Ackerman:
Is You get into the point that you're so nervous about, you're following. And you're and you're and you're you're living up to this great expectation you set. And it's getting, you know, almost like perfection is the opposite of great.

Karl Eagleman:
I know executive Uttara I it's a good feeling to know that I never get nervous about anything. I never do. The only time I kind of redraw like a race and redraw stuff is for spacing. Yeah, I really the I just because I want something to, like, look legit. I want it to look like it's, you know, it's worth following.

Karl Eagleman:
I will say sometimes if I. I double check, triple check, quadruple check stuff content. If I don't exactly know for sure what a movement. Like a point of performance might be because I want to make sure I'm providing the best stuff, I don't want to like. I want to draw somebody that's not correct.

Jason Ackerman:
You can or you can hit up one of 50 level floor coaches in the world, you know, and ask me if you ever have any questions about that. But speaking of that, you know, if you go through I really, really like your recent one. You have to put your life into the Bardes from my friend Austin Malleolo,. I see quotes from other friends of mine like Alex Zirkin back there. You know, adapting is not scaling. What's really. Obviously, nonexistant is quotes from me and from best of their day understand I say a lot of really profound things on this show. Fern says, you know, I understand not having any Fern quotes, but I don't understand not having any quotes by me what going on there Karl?

Karl Eagleman:
Please don't take a personal at all, my friend. You and I, we just got to get to know each other. This is the beginning of a beautiful relationship.

Jason Ackerman:
On We're dating? I see. I don't know. You know, I don't date very long. I go right to the bedroom, ask my wife. So now don't ask her, don't ask her about that. But yeah, I've got a best hour of their day. Yeah. For sure. You know, post her out there. Maybe throw it out there. We'll promote it. Go support Karl. But what you're doing is really great. How is this support from your wife.

Karl Eagleman:
Support from my wife is awesome, especially now that I'm really starting to like get some traction. You know, it's like she sees my passion for this. She is she's pursuing her like she's a yoga teacher, but she's also pursuing her muscle activation technique certifications as well. She's. And so we support each other in these kind of ventures. You know, when you work. In that realm, you kind of you have to be an entrepreneur, you have to think about being your own business man and growing your business. And so I support her. Folie And she supports me fully. And, you know, we cheers quite often to like to our own ventures. So it's it's I'm very thankful for that support for sure.

Jason Ackerman:
Do I see a, you know, yoga whiteboard Daly coming in the near future?

Karl Eagleman:
You might not see that, but I have. I've tossed around going. There was one post that never got around to doing. I drew it up and everything. And it was a yoga poses in weightlifting and it was like,.

Jason Ackerman:
That's cool. I like that.

Karl Eagleman:
It was a cross. I like to get up. And I might redo it. But like, you know how you would do like a high lunge and yoga? Well, I would I would compare that to be similar. Not exactly to, you know, let a split jerk. Right. There's one, you know, like you squat in yoga. There's one that's like there's there's different movements that are very similar. Kind of a crossover. And so I wanted to like I wanted to communicate the similarities of how like a weightlifter could benefit from some of the people doing yoga. So dig it back up. But she I was going to quote her and I think we got hung up on like she's trying to figure out exactly like what kind of quote she could give me. And I moved on to something else.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, well, that's so cool, Karl. We're really excited to share this again. I said it a few times, but check out Karl whiteboard_daily and then go by one of his posters by one of his T-shirts. Simpler, simpler. And you point out some great stuff. And, you know, we appreciate the linking up with you. And I hope that we can create something cool together. And of course, like I said, if you ever have questions on points and performance faults, anything you need to know, I'll be here for you.

Karl Eagleman:
Hey, trust me for sure. I'm very honored. I did I didn't see it as a heads up, but honest. I'm very honored to be on the show. I hold I o level for a high level threshold. Other Crossfit, trainers in the highest regard. And it's it's very. It means a lot to me to be done. Defined as providing good content to other people, I've got some big time plans. I feel like I'm just getting started with all of this. I'm very excited about the future. I do. Before we go on and you talked about the T-shirts and posters, and this really isn't about any kind of like monetary money making it. This is just something that I started that I think is really cool. I think it really be a benefit to. Coaches specifically, Mary, when I was talking about that book that the book of Cues well, what I did is that I I've created the whiteboard data glossary and it's it's a subscription based page on my website whiteboard daily that tips in the links are in the bio of my Instagram. And I've got like a sample page where people can check out. And actually I've I've been providing if if you can provide me with this when I say you, it's a collective, you if anybody can provide me with good constructive criticism, I've been providing a month subscription to the full glossary.

Karl Eagleman:
In the full glossary has every single piece of content that I've posted on web or daily, categorized by movement and then categorized by sports. And then it's also categorized by perspective or educational piece. Anything that I've ever pushed on web or daily is categorized so you can find exactly what you're looking for within seconds. So if you're a coach and you are going to be coaching the squat later on today, well, you could go to a whiteboard to get tips and go to the glossary. And you can within two clicks, you could have 10 cues that you could provide your athletes with for for just the squat or whatever movement that you're doing. So Jason after we get off here, I'll I'll I'll get your information and then I'll I'll I'll send it your way. You can actually check it out what I'm talking about. Like I said, there's a sample glossary but the full one is just growing big time. It's really it's a really cool piece.

Jason Ackerman:
Cool. Yeah. I definitely love to check that out. And it's worked $4.98. You know, if you're a coach. Bypassed Starbucks once. You. Don't go. Double meat. Only one time. And you've got all these coaching cues right at your disposal. And in an easy to digest way. So it's really cool. So I'm looking forward to checking that out, I'm sure. Yeah, for sure. You know, I'll learn something, you know? Despite any training I have. I'm a firm believer that you can always learn something. So even if it's just some cool to say when and when you're coaching or, you know, a different perspective on it, I'm really excited. That's really cool. Thanks for that. And again, I appreciate you being on here. It's like cold and late in Indiana. So I will let you go. I'll let you get to the next piece. You're going to create some sort of some sort of best our piece. I'm assuming it's coming out. I know.

Jason Ackerman:
We'll collaborate for sure.

Karl Eagleman:
We'll, collaborate. I appreciate that. Well, Karl, any anywhere else to go to check the earlier. You're primarily on Instagram. You got your link trees set up. So if you want to order a poster, a t shirt, check out the glossary. That's all right there from his Instagram. And like I said, when people are doing good for the community, I highly recommend we go back and support them. So thanks for all you do.

Karl Eagleman:
I'm honored. Jason, thank you so much. Thank you.

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