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125. Justin Zizumbo | From coach to owner

125. Justin Zizumbo | From coach to owner

On today’s episode Fern chats with his good friends Justin Zizumbo, owner of Crossfit New Life. They talk about, the importance of scale and how Justin has constantly worked with non-profit, with athletes in recovery. Along with Justin being a listener, he’s part of the mentorship group he discusses how that helped him progressed as a coach. He’s recently moved from being a part-time coach to an affiliate owner, they discussed how he’s handled and the effect to taking over box instead of taking it from the very beginning. Along with how much of his life has changed since and the exciting things coming to his community soon. It’s great to see someone just getting started and doing amazing things. 

Time Stamp:

(1:32) Finding Crossfit
(23:13) The underserved population being severed
(29:48) Mentor Group
(37:57) Taking over a gym 
(50:53) ReBranding box
(1:07:10) Tangible steps for seminar staff

Social media:

@ just_z_shcf
@saltyhivecrossfit

Recommend Resources:

The Wonderful World of Customer Service at Disney – J. Jeff Kober

Chasing Excellence – Ben Bergeron Podcast

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Fern:
All right, everybody, welcome back to The Best Hour of their day. Fern here with my good friend Justin Zizumbo from Salt Lake City, and he owns Crossfit, New Life. And the reason we're doing this podcast is because in my. This is actually the third podcast with Denise Thomas. She had recommend that we get somebody on the show who's kind of, you know, a listener and we've had one or two people that have done that. And Justin is one of those folks. And he's also worked with us and our mentor group. So we can talk about that, too, as well. And then. What we can do is really what I want to kind of dive into is Justin has a fairly interesting story with regard of going from a part time coach into being an owner and what that process is like. But. I know it's Friday, bro, we're recording this on Friday at least, so I appreciate you hopping on, man.

Justin Zizumbo:
I appreciate you giving me the opportunity to learn a lot from the content you guys put out. And this is kind of surreal for me to be here.

Fern:
So that's cool. So, you know, it's just two guys talking about stuff that a small percentage of the population cares about as we like to think about it.

Justin Zizumbo:
We really love right.

Fern:
And if you guys can't see, he's wearing a very, very nice looking best out of their day t shirt. So if you did not purchase those last time we did it. You missed out, but we will be selling more of them. But first, Justin, give us give us the bumper sticker story, man. Like, what's your what's your. I found Crossfit, story.

Justin Zizumbo:
So I was in college freshman. I had played sports my whole life. And what I thought was gonna keep me in shape and keep me fit would a jog to the gym on campus like at a moderate pace. And then I'd left some weights. My dad used to take me gym like 5 a.m. and expansion. We'd do bicep curls and stuff. So I jog to the gym and I'd lift weights and then I jog back. And that just got really stale. I actually was going to Utah State University and they offered accredited classes that they would call Phil. Yeah. And I was introduced to Crossfit, in my hometown in Oregon. It's a program called Workout Addiction Recovery. And I had some family that was getting help there. And they use like functional. He's not an affiliate. They use like the same the same style training. This is cool. So I took that class, loved it, and I didn't have any money at the time as a student. And I was like, I can do this stuff at a Globo Gym. And I remember walking into the gym on campus and looking around like I can do thrusters there. I could see I could do some pull ups there. And I just kind of sculpt it out and. And I literally remember walking around for like fifteen minutes just walking. I couldn't, I just couldn't. It wasn't the same feel. I signed up for that class again in the spring semester, so I took a good fall. Signed up for spring and I went and talked to the coach is like, dude, I want to be here more than twice a week because that was all the class offered. And he was just really frank with me. He's like, well, we offer student membership so you can sign up and join the gym or you can just take this course and come twice a week as a quack. Seventy five bucks a month for student membership. If I can afford that, then I remember I didn't even leave the parking lot without my car. Then I called them. I was like, I'll be there tomorrow morning.

Fern:
So I changed my mind take all my money.

And about two years later, he he asked me if I ever wanted to coach. And I literally did my respons was coach. What, football, basketball. And he's like, no coach. Crossfit,. And I was like, his name's Brad Thorn. Little shout out to him. Yeah, I learned a ton from that, too. But I was like, yeah. I thought about it. But like as a fantasy, I really looked up to him and everything he did. He's like, well, let's get you going a little bit. She offered classes right through the through the university that he started me. And that was it. I mean, he says he didn't think about it from my end. It was just like a beautiful little transition. At first I shadowed him and he'd have a workout in and then he'd be just hanging out watching me. And then I remember one day I showed up to the gym and it wasn't a workout for Brad. What do I do? He's like, come up with a workout. And I came up. I had my class do Helen Because I just picked a bench mark

Fern:
So a smart move rather than creating something or just going to go with what works. Oddly enough, that was our. That was the workout. We did it at our box Crossfit,. Rife Yesterday we did have lot.

Justin Zizumbo:
Nice.

Fern:
What was. Let me ask you this. What was your HELLEN time? Do you remember what it was first time?

Justin Zizumbo:
I have no idea. The first time.

Fern:
Was a devastating?

Justin Zizumbo:
The last time I did it was devastating.

Fern:
How fast you do it Last time?

Justin Zizumbo:
I could look it up. Give me a second.

Fern:
We're judging you on your fitness level, your adjusted make sure it's a good model.

Justin Zizumbo:
My my frans to 2:07 like four months ago.

Fern:
So there's a little fitness in there that's fast. So fast. I'm.

Justin Zizumbo:
My Helen was pretty fast, but I remember I'd like it to go fast. I got to run really fast and I fell off the pull up bar after the third round and I'm like, I'm never doing that workout again.

Fern:
Was it? Was it sub 8? Let me just ask you, was it a sub 8 Helen?

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah. 7:12.

Fern:
Dude that is. OK. So for anybody who's not aware, that is fucking fast. So.

Justin Zizumbo:
I remember getting back from my first 400 and that was like a 115 ish and.

Fern:
I was gonna say, you're gonna have to run, at least you're gonna to for sure run a sub 120 to go like in that like seven forty five and below, because that is just that's the only place to make up time there. Like if you if you could do all the kettlebell swings and unbroken and you can do. But I like it looks like the only the only place to make up there is a run run at a at a frantic. A bear is chasing you pace.

Justin Zizumbo:
That's a that's a kind of a funny story because I coached it. And then we don't have we have a free seven o'clock hour and my six o'clock group was like, are you gonna do this today? I was like, well, I've gotta go to work. Just do it right now. I'm like, Really? Yeah, hurry. We'll watch it by myself.

Fern:
We got time.

Justin Zizumbo:
That should be fast. Right? Just then you said it should be fast. All right. All right.

Fern:
That's great. Okay. So let's let's. Yeah, let's go back and let's talk about so you program, Helen. And did you coach the class or are you just like made the work out that day?

Justin Zizumbo:
No. Yeah. Coached it

Fern:
How tha go?

Justin Zizumbo:
. Yeah. Not well I remember the people trying to like do pull ups and I didn't at the time I didn't understand progressions or any.

Fern:
Just like pull harder. You just pull harder. You'll get up there.

Justin Zizumbo:
And you just swing and you pull up and you push your close. But you've done about twelve. Let go run. It was a mess. Well, I've learned a lot with those with in that group. Yeah, I mean, I was thrown into the fire, which a ton of I would say most coaches are and are in our scope today. So you just kind of you learn as you go.

Justin Zizumbo:
So let's let's talk about that real quick, because that's that's where a lot of people probably live their lives. It will enter the Crossfit, space, which is I do get thrown into the fire. And because I did, I did the same thing, you know, 12 years ago or whatever it was. But when you personally get thrown into the fire, are you aware of how much ground that you need and want to make up or you or you or. Or does that not come for a little bit, just like now that I'm doing what I'm supposed to be doing, like this is great.

Justin Zizumbo:
No, that's a really good question, because that was in my mind in terms of like showing at the time, I didn't. I didn't. It's hard to formulate this, but I don't respect coaching as a craft. I just thought Brads really good at it and I'm not. And I want to be in the gym more. So I'm going to do my best. But also the student. I was like pursuing a social work career. I saw I was a typical coaching as a hobby. And it it led me to being in the gym more. So this is cool. But the thing that I remember clicking was when he asked me if I wanted to coach at his gym. And in my head I was like, OK, I can't just talk the talk. I got to walk the walk. I've got to start eating better. I've got to start moving better. And and I like. One thing he said is he really liked how just like I I was kind of like a role model member for him. And so that's one thing that clicked right off was like, if I'm just.

Fern:
So super interesting that that is that is not a typical first thought. At least in my experience for coaches is that if I'm going to coach, I need to move better. That is a very rare response to I'm going to start coaching is that I need to actually set the example. So I think, you know, quite frankly. Good for you, because that is that is not the norm.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, I think I think that's just the culture that Brad had created or has created in Logan Castrol strength and conditioning is the name of his. He moved really well. He always did did the little things in the workout that allowed him to do better. And at the time I was like, I thought I was competitive and I thought I wanted to, like, really pursue that. So there were there were to be completely honest, there would be times where I'd like shape reps to, like, keep up with my buddies. Right. And that was something. Well, a coach I can't do that anymore.

Fern:
And it's that is something. It's one of the first conversations that I have with new coaches is that you forfeit the right to to do anything that isn't the standard. Like you forfeit the right to shave reps. You forfeit the right to move like shit. You forfeit the right to not scale appropriately. You forfeit the right to not do the form like you forfeit everything like you are now the standard bearer. So like you forfeit all those things, like you just can't be a lazy turd.

Justin Zizumbo:
To not end, I'd add to not do the warm ups with the class, right. That's a big that's a big thing that I pulled, not only just my coaches, but some of the members that lead by example. I'm like Hey. Why don't you do the warm up with with the cost today? Well, I was busy talking to Joe and Sue, and I was like, you know what? We had a couple of new people and and they're going to see you over there in the corner. Twist with the PDC pipe? And then jumping into workout. And now they think that they can do that. And that's what. That's not the culture I want. And then w

Fern:
How dose that conversation go, because I think a lot of people are scared to have that conversation.

Justin Zizumbo:
I was basically that it was a Saturday class. I remember specifically. One of the people on talk I I'm talking about she's getting her level one this weekend and I'm bringing her on slowly to coach. But I pulled two people aside and I said, hey, I want to talk to you guys about something. And this was like month one of ownership. So I was like, oh, well, I hope they receive it well. I was like, I want to bring it to you. I want to bring to your attention how I respond to something as small as not doing. And they're like, oh, well, it's not like I was we were talking about this and that. And I was like, I realize that it's not a big deal in your eyes, but people look up to you. You guys have been here the longest. Some of the longest. And whether you know it or not, everyone's watching you as much, if not more, than they're watching me as the coach. And then I.

Fern:
That is an important point to bring up. And because it's true, right. Particularly if there are some of your your, I guess, more consistent members and that they don't realize it. They don't realize it that because partly because they've been there longer. They don't realize that they are actually now kind of the top of the heap. And people look at them for like what is appropriate. And anytime I've ever had had to have that conversation, I will address it from the same way. I'm like I'm like, literally, people are watching you when you do this. Like, you have got to do that. Like, if you are so proud to be here, then you need to really actually take that to heart, because the new people that come in, they look at you on at this point in your five or six or seven year journey and they they think you're a rock star, like you need to be aware of that.

Justin Zizumbo:
And they both they both took it really well, I think. And not not with the intentions, too. I wanted them to know that I respected them and that they were leaders in our community. Not that I was just mad at them. So that that went over well. I was happy about it.

Fern:
I think I think a lot of businesses, people are just not aware of of, you know, for that particular subset of members, they're not aware of their stature within the community there because that's not how they see themselves. And then you have to shed some light on that. Be like, hey, look, listen, you're kind of the person around here that everybody's like chasing. Even though you don't see yourself that way because you still see yourself as the person six years ago who, you know, was overweight and eating Cheetos and doing all those things. But that's not who you are anymore. And then you might need to come to grips with the new identity that you have here, which is like you're you're kind of a pipe fitter and in the world of Crossfit, in this community.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, that's exactly what happened. And like I said, one of them. I've seen a complete change in her demeanor and she's been brought up over the years as a potential coach. But it was the demeanor like she came in here, like just focus on her performance and just focus on crushing it. Lately, I've seen that shift in the whole process and the community connecting people. And that's ultimately what led me to asking her to get to level one and start coaching. So that's fun. I didn't I didn't think about those things until that came up.

Fern:
So how long have you been coaching at this point?

Justin Zizumbo:
So I got my level one in 2015, but I was coaching in that logging gym without a level one six and a half, seven years maybe.

Fern:
Ok, so you're not you're not new. You're not a new greenhorn. You know, for for in the coaching world. OK. So what point at what point do you start kind of making this mental shift from like, OK, I'm doing this kind of like on the side. I like it. It's fine. I get a free membership to this this idea that I might be able do this for a living like. That is that was a bad ass idea.

Justin Zizumbo:
You know, that's interesting because I think it just slowly. It slowly became that. So I came, I. I was in a partnership with the previous owner. So there's been three owners of the gym. I'm out right now. It's called Crossfit, New Life. The second owner, I was in an unofficial partnership with him. And I hoped that that partnership would just kind of supplement my income.

Fern:
So back up pack up your backpack. What is it? What's an unofficial partnership? I'm just curious.

Justin Zizumbo:
So he wanted to buy out his. And I think the best way to describe it was his uncle got a step uncle, but he didn't have the money to. The total amount. And so my dad helped us buy that. So I wasn't on paper, but I was like I was managing my dad's agreed on percentage.

Fern:
Fair enough. OK, cool.

Justin Zizumbo:
The interest, I feel like where things really turn about a year ago, so I was working for the state as a social worker for close to three years. And I tell.

Fern:
Hows that how's that?

Justin Zizumbo:
What do you mean? That's a loaded question, isn't it?

Fern:
Well, yeah, that's why I asked my like my mom has been a as been a private practice social worker for almost 40 years. And my sister was a was a social worker working for the state and St Lewis like truancy. And depending on what you do in social work, that can be not the greatest job.

Justin Zizumbo:
So the good thing about that state job was the flexibility. I mean, they taught a lot of people that go to retire at the state. So you don't work a ton. Like it's like you can only work 40 hours. You get every holiday you can think of. But the work was tough, man. I was working with troubled kids and most of my mission was suicide prevention, which I I really I'm really passionate about that. And I learned a ton. I would give trainings to all the staff. I would even travel the state to provide those trainings. And just at the end of the day, the culture of the state in terms of like the slow moving bureaucratic system. It just wasn't it. I was I was in my early twenties and I wanted to move I wanted it. I wanted to be challenged more. So I took a job in a private practice or while it was in the private sector and back to that war. So the the the program I mentioned that was helping one of my family members. It's good stand for workout addiction recovery. He's been a non-profit forever, and he was being helped to create a legitimize like outpatient program for drug alcohol.

Justin Zizumbo:
And they needed a lustfully license clinician to do that. And so it was. It was beautiful. At the time was like, this is perfect. I'm going to be able to coach. I'm going to be able to do social work. This is like my dream. It's a blend of both worlds. Long story short, I wasn't really working for war. I was working for the company that was helping them get on their feet. And that company, I really hadn't no no desire to work for. I was thrown into a clinical director role. I was moved around a bunch and just burnt me out. And that's where the point I was like, you know, I I I feel best when I'm coaching. Even even at the war program, I'd sit down and do like an individual group therapy session. And then when I had my clients in the gym, I felt like I can make a bigger impact. Whether that was my lack of skills as a clinician, possibly. It was definitely my I'm more passionate about the gym, like I know I know I'm putting my better foot forward when I'm coaching and I'm in the gym with people rather than in an office.

Fern:
Well, I don't know if that's completely fair to you. You're talking about people who are too tiredly and different entirely different head spaces. You know, somebody who's in treatment, particularly in this at the state level or some of these like isn't doesn't necessarily want to be there in a lot of instances like you there because of some sort of intervention or there was mandated for due to a court order where, you know, in the Crossfit, space, you know, people who don't want to be at the gym or not at the gym. You know, people who you're dealing with are there and they're pumped up and they're excited. That's the beauty of the level. One is like there is something incredibly. What's the word I'm looking for? Incredibly gratifying about standing in front of a group of people that want nothing more than to spend time with you and learn about stuff, which is the same thing as being an affiliate owner, right, like that. That's why that whole that whole idea is so intoxicating. Like, you're like, man, I get to help people and they like can want to be here every day. Like this is a incredible . Are you looking to. Are you looking to integrate any of that type of kind of a recovery or social work kind of counseling aspect into your affiliate at some point?

Justin Zizumbo:
So I still do. I was trying to be brief with the story of getting burned out, but what happened was so a town called .org in about an hour north of me, that's where I started. And then I slowly moved to a location closer to this gym in Salt Lake Crossfit,. And I was able to bring the clients that I was working with in Salt Lake to to Crossfit, New Life and Train them a couple times. And so I'm still doing that for the company that I was clinical director. They come in Wednesday evenings and Saturdays and I do. I mean, I just modify the workout we have for the day. Initially when I first started, I overthought it and like tried to create this on ramping like that and like, you know, maybe instead of doing power cleans, like we're gonna kind of. ESSWEIN But it's just where you're. And instead of doing a 15 minute Amran, we might do two on and one off for five rounds. So anyway, I'm where I don't want it. This isn't about programming, but I still work with them and I do a class like a lecture once a week and I go up and just talk about health to be completely fair. I've just ripped off versions, five factors of health and I teach that to them. It's been fun.

Fern:
Well, no, I do not. I mean, it's all of this part guises about coaching and programming is an aspect of that. And I think with a lot of the shifts to health and a lot of, you know, which Coach Glassman is referred to as the underserved population, like people are like full disclosure, like work, we're like trying to put together some ways to do that. And Michelle Moots, who is a flow master Crossfit, and an OGE,.

Justin Zizumbo:
She was just taught my level, two.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, she's she's the heat. She's great. And she's been around forever. She's like at original Santa Cruz, like she's OGE as they get. And she was just on Jewely Free schayes podcasts. And we're going to have her on the podcast because that is largely her function within Crossfit,, not like she travels back and forth weekly to teach those classes at Santa Cruz. And like she flies back and forth every week to teach that to to these people who are the least likely people to ever join a crossfit the gym. So like that's kind of the population you're dealing with. So talk to me a little bit about how you because what you're developing, just purely by coincidence or accident is what I feel is probably the most undervalued skill set with any Crossfit, coach, which is the ability to scale workouts effectively. The question comes up all the time. Okay, what if this person comes into the gym like I like I just I can't I can't give him the experiences that they need. I'm like, well, that's a coach problem. Like we like it shouldn't matter who walks in the role. Like you should be able to scale and give them something that's appropriate. So talk to me a little bit about your approach to the.

Justin Zizumbo:
In terms of scaling this population?

Fern:
Yeah, I mean, like most people are dealing with people who want to be fit and want to live a healthy lifestyle. That's just and that's not who you're describing right now.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, it's it's it's just hard to speak generalities. So I I had a great opportunity to coach at a nonprofit called Fit to Recover there. They offer free classes to those that are in recovery. And I learned quickly how to really connect with that community. The people recovering from drugs and alcohol disorder. And it and that's what that to me. If I miss a scale. But I can connect with somebody and they can trust me, that's that's the biggest thing when when they feel like I'm hard and or they don't I don't understand them. And then I ask them to do something different. Or give them a scaling option that they're not gonna do it. So. So to me, I don't know if that answers your question.

Fern:
I like a little bit. I think. I think what you're alluding to a little bit more is empathy. You know, like in which kind of answers another question for you, which is like, what is the skill set from the social work realm that you think is been most beneficial to you as a coach? And basically what you just said is like is like high levels of empathy, high EQ, as we would describe it.

Justin Zizumbo:
One hundred percent. Yeah, that's that's been I use it. And I don't regret any of my social work, education or that career path because it just meant I feel like it just made me a better student. Appreciate where people may or may not be coming from and to give people the benefit of the doubt and to do kind of do no harm. Right. So a lot of there's a ton of parallels between that and a coach.

Fern:
It's interesting that you bring that up because that is kind of Dr. Oath is do no harm first, you know, but. And that probably wouldn't be a bad idea for all of us to adopt when coaching is like, hey, first and foremost, like, my job is to not mess you up and forget, like pushing people towards like doing awesome. Like a maybe my first job is to help you avoid any sort of injury, you know, like that's that's a I had I have never actually thought about it that way. But now, that's a good way to think about it.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah. We use the first nonprofit that I coached. We used the circle up and almost do like a round robin, almost like a group therapy intro. And you would set your intention for the workout in the hour and I would always go last as the coach. And that was my my attention was basically the same. I was like, my first intention is to keep you all safe. I hope that you learn something along the way. And then the cherry on top would be that you get a little more fit and you and you work hard. So those are my goals. So I've continued to have to have that perspective. Whether it's whether it's one of my best athletes who's capable of doing anything or a complete novice, an under served as as coach Glassman, when they say, I want them to train today so they can come back tomorrow, or whether that that means avoiding injury or not going too hard and like not limiting the intensity but the appropriate amount of them.

Fern:
That's something I probably took me far too long to learn, which is being a far more liberal with pumping the brakes or pulling the reins or however you want to describe it, but basically just telling people to slow the hell down. Just listen, man, there's no words here. Like nobody's given out trophies at the end of this workout. Like, just calm down. You're gonna tear your hands or you're going to hurt your back or like whatever it is. I wish I'd have been way more way more strategic and way more pre-emptive about that. In my early days as a coach and just told people that it was OK to not go full ham sandwich every day when they come in the gym, you know?

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, it just it's not effective to do that. I don't think I think the community and I don't. I'm not calling anybody out. The community was a little too focused on intensity like. I like when I talk about the definition of Crossfit,, I throw in relative. Into this statement.

Fern:
It's it's you. It's if you're talking about intensity, absent of the fact that it is relative, that is negligent. And I think everybody just like and that is what it's like. It is a it is a massive part of what is Crossfit, lecture when we say, hey, you know, yes, we do want intensity. It is the thing that gives us the results. But we cannot overlook. The aspect of that, it is relative to both physical and psychological colleges, and you have to take that into account because ignoring that is how people get injured. You want the recipe for injury. Here it is. Everybody take something that you're not super competent with. Do more weight than you should do and then do it quickly. That's it. That's it. And your job as a coach is to avoid that.

Justin Zizumbo:
Sure, for sure.

Fern:
What was what were some of the biggest hurdles that you and I don't mind kind of talking about the mentor group? Like what were some of the biggest struggles you've had as a coach and then maybe some things that that were I don't know what the word is highlighted or illuminated or brought to light for you with working with us. Like the point and the point is not about this, but I think everybody goes through this process at some point.

Justin Zizumbo:
I think my biggest hurdle and I think it continues to be there is like the fear of fail that I want. I want to be perfect, like I want my core like, right. And that's just not like the fear to try something different. And to coach something like, I love my camera, what podcast it was of you guys. But it's like you should you should pick them. That the movement that you're not good at and not good at coaching and coach. It's the same thing with philosophy. If you're a hell of a runner, you should you should lift a little bit more and you're running an overall fitness is better and not just like me, like a sack of bricks. When you guys were talking about that. And so I would avoid coaching some of those things because I wasn't comfortable doing them and I didn't want to come across as an idiot. You know, I don't want someone to leave my closet oil. Then that didn't work or I didn't get much out of Justin's Crossfit,. So it just put myself out there and and trying something new. Trying to try to implement, trying to change, like get out of routine, mix up my warm-ups, mix up my scaling option. And like I said, it doesn't always get grey, it often doesn't go to my own standards. And I'm getting a little off topic.

Fern:
But, you know, no, that's actually that's actually right on topic because I think that is is something that should be acknowledged, is that this is a process. And and the reality is most of us live out that process real time in the gym every day, like there is a in my personal journey. There is a significant chunk of my time as an affiliate owner and as a coach. We're largely what I was doing every day in the gym was experimenting like I was just figuring the fuck out. Right. Trying things, messing it up, trying new things, messing it up. Shouldn't like all the stuff that you just talked about. I don't know that there's any other. Way to progress. And I read. I do write a blog from my gym for Crossfit, RIF and I end the blog this week on Wednesday, it was about that because I was diving into a book by the CEO of 1 800 Got Junk. He wrote and he wrote a book called Willing to Fail is just WCF, but it's willing to fail. And he talks about just the litany of failures that he had that have ultimately resulted in this billion dollar company. That is 1 800 Got Junk. But he like laid off the whole company at one point, like he almost filed for bankruptcy. Another point, he almost sold it to venture capitalists at a different point.

Fern:
And he and he describes it as failing up. And I think if we can adopt that and yet failing up. And if we can adopt that and I did a podcast that dropped if you ever listen to us, like, how fat is your gym using all the things that were, for whatever reason, very comfortable with fitness and then applying them to like the rest of our life, you know, like nobody's everybody. You fail every single day when you walk in the gym. Like, I cannot think of a day and Crossfit, where I was like crushed it, like I'm done. Like I could always go on faster regardless. Like that 2 0 7 4. And you talked about like, I'm sure that you finished that workout and you immediately reflected on it and you like I took. I throttled back a little bit at one at some point in there and I probably got to 0 6 and it just like, OK. So I failed there and then like trying to maintain threshold. And I think that was kind of my question is like, how much of that have you that willing to fail? Have you now or have you a different question started to carry that into gym ownership or entrepreneurship?

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, I hope I'm doing that daily. One thing that I've found that's helped me is just acknowledging it. If I am like starting on a warm up or I like like the other Saturday, we had it as a partner workout or a three person workout. The second person was holding a plank or something off their head. And there was a couple of times throughout the workout where I just changed it, just like turn off the music like, hey guys, we're going to stop holding the plate overhead and then you're gonna plank that. And and and then I was like, okay. And then on the third round, you get to choose if you're going to hold the plate over your head or if you're gonna plank. And I had members that have been around for while like laughing. And I was like, well, you know, I didn't think through all of that. They're gonna smoke. Their shoulders are small.

Fern:
That's that's that's what I like to describe as aggressive. Yeah, that's what I like to describe as do not ride a bad idea like the second you've decided that this is no longer in order, just abandon it. Don't worry about it. Just tell everybody. That was a dumb idea. Like I am very sorry, but we are moving on past that ridiculousness that I just concocted in my brain.

Justin Zizumbo:
Not all. I'll just say I'll say stuff like that. Well, I changed my mind and it won't be the last time or I've made a mistake and it won't be the last time or I forgot to do this. Guys like Frank, the p.p.s. bikes back out. And I promise that it won't be the last time I forget.

Fern:
Do you find it? that makes people trust you more because of that?

Justin Zizumbo:
That's a good question. I think that. I think that it just it. One thing I do feel like it does is it just minimizes instead of avoiding it. Oh crap. They should stop there PDC pipes and make up some excuse. Right. I can laugh about it. They can laugh about it. And we're just going to jump back like just lost. I think yesterday I was like, whoa, I'm way off my timeline and you get wet. We got to hurry up. And this like this won't be the last time that I do this guy. So and instead of instead of, like putting blame on them, just taking ownership. And I would think if if I swapped shoes and a coach said something like that. Came in, that's cool. What I I I try to live the way that I would respect somebody else to live. And I think when someone acknowledges their mistakes or their failures, it that takes vulnerability. And so I try to do that as much as I can.

Fern:
I we had some coaches here for those CDP for the coach of the course last week. And that happened very briefly during I think it was in one of the warm ups. Coaches like froze on something and they just forgot what they were doing, which I've seen, you know, countless times. And like afterwards they were just just came up and said, I just forgot what I was doing. And I said, it's fine. Just tell everybody that. And if you can't remember, just move on to the next thing. It doesn't matter. Like nobody's going to remember that. Just own it and move on. Like, it's fine, you know? And I think people are or are. Or more concerned about being embarrassed than just saying, you know what? I just literally lost my train of thought. I have no idea what we're doing right now. Like, we're just gonna move on. I'm going to make up something right now. And I do that. I did that earlier this week. I just, like, forgot something. And we just circle back to it. I'm like, I'm a more on everybody. My apologies. We're going to circle back to this.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, it all happened in my brief occasionally. I'm a little scatterbrained. And then if I'm coaching like back-to-back hours, I'm like, did I tell you guys about this or did I tell you know what? Forget it. I'm gonna say it again. If I repeat myself, I'm sure not all of you are listening to me anyway. So here we go.

Fern:
Fact that is a fact that not somebody has checked out. So we checked out. I do have a question. What since since you've made this transition from part time coach to owner, I'm always very, very intrigued by this question. What is something that you now know that you didn't know previously about owning a gym? Is there something that you thought was going to be different?

Justin Zizumbo:
I think this is I would answer that the same way a friend is like, hey, I'm own an affiliate. What like what do you think? What I would say the same thing is it's an interesting lifestyle here. I speak for myself. I'm not going to say you. I'm up early. A lot of the days and I'm I'm here. I don't even call it work because I love it. But I'm here it late into the most of the evenings. And then there's some downtime. So that's been the hardest transition for me. And then I spend a lot of time by myself. So like, thank God for your guys's podcast up there. Because. Because I don't I mean, my fiance is involved and she helps coach. And just recently, I've been trying to delegate and help ask members for help on some organizational stuff and backend stuff. I spend a decent amount of time by myself. And I bet I'm used to working with big teams and having like to share an office with or be able to like, Hey, Fern, did you just get that email? What did you think about that? Like setting up this podcast with the zoom thing. I was like, I don't have anybody to ask about zoom. I got to figure this shit out on my own.

Fern:
I can I can empathize with that because I when we started this, Jimmy, it was part time. So I had coaches here during the day, so I never had to do that. That like lonely time. But I did recently have to do with some other stuff that we were trying out and. Damn like the loneliness is devastating sometimes, so like I. We're not that way anymore, like there's somebody there's multiple people here all throughout the day. Like we have massage therapists, we have other coaches that are doing stuff. So I I do not take for granted like the fact that I can just like yell out the door and Casey and I can banter about something or we're talking about something within the business. So, yeah, I totally get that.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, yeah. Like, don't take that for granted. Yeah. OK. I randomly call somebody or set something up intentionally to do that. And I'll try to stay here because I know if I go home on those down hours, I'm less productive. And I don't get my head. I deal with anxiety a lot that is closely related to some depression. And so if I I'm at home by myself on those like lonely hours, it's like it's a slippery slope with or my show goes so on that.

Fern:
No, I do. I don't know if this is going to be coaching or not. What how do you deal with that? Because I. So I don't think you're unique in that sense, because I do think a lot of being an entrepreneur is lonely and involves a massive amount of anxiety because like you could lose everything. What what are some things that you like? I know what my mechanisms are for dealing with that those feelings. What are some of the things that you deal with? Because I would take it to Vegas and bet on it. There is a gym owner that is listening to this is like just going to talking to me right now. Is he talking about me?

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, I think it's it's simple but difficult to do. One thing I've been trying to do lately is not take myself so serious. And this is and this is not downplaying the role that we play, but right up right away, the first couple months of ownership, it was my life, right? And so I thought in my head every time someone walks in here that their experience here is as big as it is. I'm like a glorified priestess. They come in here for an hour and they leave and they leave it all here. They don't take it with them like I do. And so I've tried to just not like not take it as myself. And this and their experience is so serious. And then just try to do my best every day. And it goes back to being OK to fail. I recently came across this, called it. It's called a hit list. And I like it because like a hit list. Right. I get after this high, high impact tasks are high high impact task. Yeah. And it's just that I try to start my day or the night before and I just list I absolutely need to get done. And that gives me some focus. Like when even if I write like a timeline for my day, kind of got from two to three from 10 to noon. I can eat. And so I've got to write that down or I like Will.

Fern:
My wife yells for never eating lunch. Yeah. My wife and I. She's like, you have to eat it like you. I'm like, I'm intermittent fasting. She's like, no, you're forgetting you moanon.

Justin Zizumbo:
So you're trying to come up with it. And I don't I don't always succeed. But the thing that I when I came across that hit list is go back to your to do list and and own it, whatever. You didn't cross off. Right. Why? Was it because you jumped on social media or that you took him out or or you had an opportunity jump on a podcast? Why did you own it? Right. Like own the fact that you didn't. And then just try to learn from it. OK. Well, I'm going to try the next the next day. I'm going to do this, this and this. And I don't want to let things get in the way. I'm not I'm not make sense.

Fern:
But, you know, you make my total do it. You're making total sense, which is and I'm I'm super. Because that was going to be my recommendation for anybody who's, you know, spinning their wheels on what to do. So, like, this is my list for today. Right. And I've got for maybe 50 percent of done I stuff to get the rest of it done. And I might miss a couple of things, but I'm still gonna be 90 percent done. So here's one for you. So you can see it, but you're not watching the video version of this. So we just finished doing a construction project in our front lobby to create a new office. But I've been without an office for like weeks, actually months at this point. And I've been my super discombobulated. Like, I just feel completely unorganized. But we're just kind of almost done with this. And I just painted this whole wall behind me. This is dry erase paint. So this whole wall I can write on what? Yeah. It's amazing. Like so you should pick a wall in your in you offince.

Justin Zizumbo:
I've heard of chalkboard paint, not dry erase paint?

Fern:
So the whole thing is a dry erase board and I can take things on and off there. And I've just been vomiting on this board for the past couple days and then the lists are important. So I think of it as like, what do I suck at list? And I'm like, what can we improve? Like, what are we bad at? Like, I imagine myself as an athlete, I'm like, if I was trying to make you the games, like, what's the first thing I need to shore up so I could start writing all that crap on the board? And now it gives me stuff to do. Now I know I'm never without a task, which is, you know, as a business owner, like you can't say you want to figure out, OK, because that shifts over time.

Fern:
You know, like at first I'm like, I'm doing everything. So I'm gonna do this, you know? And I got to contact this person to lead follow up. And I got do the scheduling, I do the programming. And then eventually it becomes like I need to check on this person who owns this task or we need to revamp this entire process and change the whole thing. And like I mean, for me, I got dry erase board everywhere I got another one on this wall right here, just like I mean, just stuff. And that way I can cross them off or quick and then replace them with something else. So if that if you're not doing that list, you're great because it removes the ability. And I think Ackerman said this on a previous podcast and he stole from somebody, I'm sure, because you're not that smart. But he said something. It was just like, you know, pencils or pencils or for remembering. And then in your mind is for being creative. So the more places you can offload ideas to make room for new ones, the more productive you'll be. And that way can just go back. I don't have to remember this anymore. It's written every allocate I want to allocate or mental resources to that and just go down the list and get creative. Put stuff on there. And what you'll find is you start becoming like really productive with those things. So for anybody who's listening and feels unproductive, just like start making these lists and start chipping away at them and then evaluate like, am I being busy or am I being productive? That's the that's the question. Why ask yourself.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, I love I love that concept. I feel so. They are consciously I'll stay busy to avoid the things that I don't like, the bookkeeping or like the less fun stuff, like all those dumbbells need to be made to be dusted. I'm gonna to those real clinic and that's like just then. Are you avoiding the shit? You're right. It's like it's procrastination. But it looks busy. And so. And even if it sounds like a tough pill to swallow.

Fern:
Yeah, but even if you are procrastinating, if it's on a list, if it's on this board, something like this is actually a Black Friday list. But if it's on a list somewhere, at least it's gonna steer me in the face and at some point I'm gonna get fed up with it and do it. But if you don't have the right down anywhere, it's like it's not real. It's just this thing that I can avoid. It's not in my line of sight. So start making the list and make them obvious. You know,.

Justin Zizumbo:
What you're doing is because that list is on your wall. It's not stuffed in your backpack,.

Fern:
Correct.

Justin Zizumbo:
Like that. I think that's a big difference. Like I got this benefit tucked away and slid under another list and you don't see it.

Fern:
Yeah. Or I've had or I've been sitting here with it with the coaches who have blasted me. They're like, hey, how long is that going to stay on the to do list? Like, when are you going to do that? No, that's that's totally fair. And thank you for keeping me accountable. So when you put it up here and like because we do consoles and you're like, I'm not afraid of anything that's on the board. Like, whatever. But like, if I can put it on there and then somebody can look at it, now I'm accountable to other people.

Fern:
Cool. I have to I have to share this parallel. So we have our spaces, too, like mirrored off, mirrored spit. I can't speak, but at. So we have two units that are mirror images of each other that we are grown. So we grow grew into the second one over the years. So we have we had two front rooms, one in which was my office. And you said you just all we.

Fern:
Oh nice.

Justin Zizumbo:
That little area used to be my office. And now officless. So I'm building a little front desk where I'll do office work at. When you when you said that you're going through construction and you don't have an office. Yeah, I've been I'm going through that right now.

So it's it's been it's been the worst. And I do. There's a book called The Wonderful World of Customer Service at Disney World or at Walt Disney or something like that. And in there, it talks about a ton of craft. But there is something in there that one of the big things I took away from that book was having what's considered back stage. Right. So like Walt Disney to have backstage. And that's like the only people the only place people are allowed to go out of character is if they're backstage. Outside of that, when they were in public, they are 100 percent in character. You don't take your head off. You don't you don't not be Cinderella like whatever. And I think it's important, if possible, for her to have somewhere in your facility where coaches and staff can be offs, can be backstage and they can just work or chill out or not be in direct line of sight of other members, because then you just resistive like a drive by shooting all the time that you can never get anything done.Hey do you have a second to like? Not really, but the doors open. So that's my fault, you know. So. So having somewhere where they can literally close a door and just be backstage and not be crushed because this this can get exhausting like depending on how many members you have, like there's just not like I've been listening to the door open and close there for the past like two and a half hours has just been. Doo doo doo doo. And I'm just like, yeah, I mean I mean, you're getting it done, you know?

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah, unfortunately, because I put the took that space out, we don't have a backstage. We do have we have some like space above like a like a high rise. But as you were saying, I throw a couple couches or spots up there like the coaches can just chill out,.

Fern:
Do it.

Justin Zizumbo:
I like it. Cool. All right. What? Let's talk a little about the film, because I know you're getting ready to do a rebranding. Talk to me about that.

Fern:
Yes. So the affiliate that I currently own, I guess technically and have owned for the last eight months is called Crossfit, New Life. That name and affiliation was created by the first owner. So I'm the third owner. And I knew come October when our affiliation was up and our insurance was up, that I'd I'd have an opportunity to make a decision as kind of how that terminate terminate. Long story short, it just made sense for me to create something that that I have that create something for me and something that I'm passionate about. The name Crossfit, New Life means nothing to me and the community. And what it stands for is what meant something to me. But the name itself didn't. And so, yeah, this is, I was told, firm before we jumped on. I'm announcing that to the membership tonight. Our open party come Monday morning after after a busy Sunday, this gym will be operating under the affiliation of Salty Hive Crossfit,.

Fern:
So what is what's the significance of that of that name?

Justin Zizumbo:
So I really wanted something that the community could own and that is community driven. So the definition of hive is a teeming multitude, which basically is just like a busy group of people that are like always working. And so initially I I applied through headquarters or Hive Crossfit, and i applied for And Utah is the Beehive State. So I got it, too. And and then my second option, which I'm glad I'm actually really glad they they they chose Salty Hive because the new logo and how it looks and it looks cooler, salty was the connection to Salt Lake City. So and then right. Like you get salty, you get sweaty. And I'm up to my members. I've always had kind of a flair like a salty flair. So I think it just speaks. So I guess who I am. That's cool. So salty hive. And yeah, I'm I'm really, really excited about it. It's been a lot of back work and it's something that I just kind of like have tried to bottle up with a lot of interactions with my members. We're going to do a good order or we like what I need to. I need another beanie and I'm like, I can't make anymore. Crossfit, new life stuff because it's like we're not gonna be called Crossfit, new life. I've just told them, like, I'm getting around to it. Sorry. I'm shity like basically what I'm trying to say.

Fern:
That's all right, though. They'll get it once you once you announce it in the big house. That's why he's holding out on me. So on that note, and when we can like, I guess pseudo wrap up here, but has you know that you're eight months into this, what is some advice that you would give to a new affiliate owner? Right. Like you're purchasing into once it's a little bit different, you know, starting from scratch. That has its own challenges. But like, what have you learned in those eight months that you would you're like, hey, listen, if you're starting to feel like this is this is something you need to know.

Justin Zizumbo:
I think I go back to the lifestyle. It's a different lifestyle. Be be prepared for a lot of early mornings of prayer for a lot of late evenings. And then I think this is something that I've just. And willing to do recently, just like ask for help, like it's OK to not know the answer and it's OK. I'm pretty particular about things, but I've been given my coaches a little bit more of a responsibility. And and members that I've like ask like, can I help you move that what the water station gets like? They're not asking to help if they don't want to help and you don't have to do it. All right. I know you want to because you have pride in it. And you you believe just like me and this is maybe a little bit bigoted, but I'm going to do it the best. Maybe. Like I know. I know that I know what I can do. So I want to try to do it all. Like, it's not it's not effective. And recently, I'm just like, hey, I get way more done when I involve.

Fern:
And I guess that is the that is the new entrepreneur delusion is that you can do everything better than everybody else. And I think this book, probably a Gary V thing. At some point you have to realize that somebody else operating at an eight is better for you and the team than you operating out of 10 at some point like the eight is more than good enough. And you just have to let that kind of like weird. I'm better than everybody else at everything go because reality is like you're just not like you

Justin Zizumbo:
Ego man.

Fern:
Yeah, it's just your ego is just you wanting to do all this stuff because you do take pride in it. So if that's you maybe switch that and take pride in developing and handing things off and take pride in developing other people that do things well, not just that you do things well because you can't shake that. If you can't shake that you can't own a business like you're just a good number two, if you if you're you're not a good number one if that's the case. That's that's super cool. Dude, I can I can.

Justin Zizumbo:
Yeah. Cause compensate compensate your coaches as much as you can. Obviously financially. But even just like more and more pats on the backs like more more positive feedback. You know you my coaches do so many good things. And then I'll be like, you missed that one thing. Yeah. Like, you know, like like just be just. I know it's small and it's like getting on nice people. In fact. But it goes a long way. Sure. Sure. Ty, it's not coach. I did. You crushed it today.

Fern:
It's not small. It's not small at all. One thing I've. I don't think I do nearly enough of it. But one thing I do really make a point to do is anytime I get good feedback from a member, whether it's a text or an email or or message, a dm or something like that, I forward that immediately to ever it is that they talking about because I'll get that on a regular basis. I get some feedback about a good coach and my response is, thank you so much. I want to pass this along right now and I let the coach know be like, hey, listen, like you really crushed it and you made Melissa's day. So I think you need to know that. And because they're gonna feel good about it, like they they need those pats on the back. And if you don't give them pats on the back and all you're doing is being critical, it's gonna be really tough to stay on the team. And that's something I. That's something I personally battle with a lot because I'm not like gift giving and all that stuff is not my love language. Like, it's not like I my love language is like my time. Like, that's how I prefer to give. Like, this is why I love doing this. Like, this is what what what fuels me. But that doesn't mean I. I can ignore those other things like my coaches don't momentarily want my time. Like they want to be told that they did a good job. So it's something that I still recall wrestle with and I'm still not the best at it. You know, like, for instance, CASSIDY just he's like, hey, I think we need to give the coaching staff like some sort of Christmas present. And I was like, yeah, I agree, but that would never come across my radar. Maybe that makes me a crappy person. But like, it just it's just not what the thing that I think about. And so I was just like, yeah, I mean, like, you tee it up. Do you like the answer is yes. What what what should we do? And I'm more than happy to do that because I'm never not on board with it. Like, it just doesn't come into my field of vision for whatever, you know, just like scatterbrain half the time. So sometimes you need to bring in people who are gonna be like, hey, you need to do this. And I'm like, yeah, you're right. But I would have never thought of that on my own for just because I'm a.

Justin Zizumbo:
And sometimes it's like you're right. How? Right. And that's why I think that involving is I mean, involving more people. I guess not as you can involving people you trust and people you value that.

Fern:
You know, where you can get a lot of those people in your community. I do a lot of business with with my members, like we do business transactions where I buy stuff from them or I buy services from them and they buy this for me. And because there's a there's there's definitely some safety there, like none of your members is going to sell you something, either a product or service. That's shitty. Like, it's just not going to happen because everybody's going to know they're like, oh, you know, it was got to do the drywall. It could do a real shoddy job in here like that. That is not going to happen. Right. Like they're just going back. No, no. Just give me my best effort. I'm sending my best guy to do the thing at your facility. So, you know, if you need help, like that's the first place I tell people to turn is like a ping. You your community, like I was talking to somebody the other day, like I'm looking for a new coach, but I don't know where to go. And I might send an email to the entire gym and tell them I'm looking for a coach. If you have somebody else interested, send them my way and we'll talk more about like what that looks like. But like tap into the community, put so much time and effort to it. You might as well use it to your advantage and they want to help you.

Fern:
So I think that's an untapped resource for a lot of folks as they just don't want to ask. They feel bad about it. But like the people want to help you.

Justin Zizumbo:
Have you had a bad experience with a like like blurring the lines of client relationship?

Fern:
No, the only time I've had a bad experience was and this is one hundred percent, my fault was I did not set expectations for what the kind of internship. What's with the transition would look like from being a member to potentially being a coach? And I jacked that up because at the end of that, the person did not make it full. And this is years ago, but the person didn't fully make it through, and they ended up leaving because I did not set. Set the expectation and say, hey, this might not result in no employment of any sort. And here is what I expect of you. It was just kind of like they failed in an air quotes and then they were embarrassed and they left. And that is one hundred percent on me. But I never had a bad experience other than that, members. So like I said, there's just like peer pressure is a real thing. And and people who are into you and into your business are not going to do that. Like they're not going to because like they don't want to be the turd because they just don't want to be that guy or gal. So I think it's like one of the one of the safest things you could do, in my opinion. Cool. Well, listen, man, we're right at the hour, mark. So I know you're busy. I still have to go finish that that list that I got. So I got something for the weekend anyway. Dude, this is really cool. Any anything you're reading currently or documentary series that you're into that would be helpful for anybody.

Justin Zizumbo:
I had a struggle reading because of my busy brain in terms of like my anxiety, I have a hard time sitting down, so honestly, I'm just trying to read more. I wrote I went out to Crossfit, HQ. I got to give out a shout to carry hair. He was instrumental in helping the new affiliate , so thanks. But he gave me the two brain business I'm chipping away at. I'll learn a ton and then close it. But I'm more of a podcast guy. Huge on your guys as podcasts. Obviously Ben version always puts out good stuff.

Fern:
How do you how do you read? Like when do you read? A certain time of day. Do you read like what do you do?

Justin Zizumbo:
So the best, the best. Time I felt I found to read as a lonely time we talked about and I try to just sit on my couch and get like, give myself 15 minutes, because if I don't like if I don't give myself a time, walk it out like we talked about, I'll get distracted in my head about what else I should be doing. And I just try to set a timer and like, read for fifteen. And that's all you're done.

Fern:
So, yeah, I do something very similar. I started this years ago because I have the I have the reading skills of a toddler. And I mean, I literally graduated college. Having never read a book color cover to cover, which I'm not sure if that is a good thing or not, but. So years ago and I would say I haven't read like a mass amount of books, but at this point, if properly read substantial amount of books, I don't know when I started this, but it's 10 pages a day. That's it. And so then the question is like, what if you're really digging it? I'm like, I stop at 10 pages. I'm like, what if you're really struggling? I read them. I push through on the ten pages. And then what that is what that has led itself to is if you do that right. So you do the math on this. You can read 12, 300 page books a year, which is about 12 more than most people read a year. And then if I'm if I'm in that last year and if I'm really struggling with a book, then I just stop reading it. Then I just pick up the next one and I start if I'm like, really? Like if I find myself like just trying to grind through a book, I just put it down and go to the next one. So ten pages a day has been instrumental for me because it's not it's not a terrible amount of time.

Fern:
And again, I'm a horrible reader. Like, I just not it's not something I'm good at. But what the other doctor isn't better? I don't know. For me, it has to do with like, what is the what is the what type of book is it like? It will determine like the speed at which I read through it. So some of them I read way faster or some of them I read way slower. But it's 10 pages regardless of what I'm doing. The only time I read more than 10 pages is if I'm trapped somewhere like on a plane, which I am on a pseudo frequent basis for senmairs hours. That's the only time because I literally have nowhere else to go. But if everything else, no matter what I do in the morning and do at night, I do whatever I can get it. Most of time it's in the morning, 10 pages. And what it usually would it actually is really nice about it is because I also have the, you know, retention skills of a toddler. 10 pages is not a terrible amount of information to retain. So then I can usually take that 10 pages and somehow apply it to my day because again, you just have to figure out how to waste it. Yes. When you're smart,.

Justin Zizumbo:
That's that's the hard part about reading some I'm stuck on as I get inspired every page. Right. I'm like, oh, I got to stop and process and figure out how to implement that. So I like I like the 10 pages

Fern:
10 pages, man, because then I'm just like, I've got to go from page 30 to page 40. And it's just like it's like biting off, you know, 10 reps on a workout. I just got to get to the next 10 reps and then I'm going to move on to the next thing. So I tried out. You know, for me, it's just like it's led from doing zero reading to reading, you know, quite a bit and and not taking a terrible amount of my time. Like that's that's the other part of it is just like, I don't want to sit out five hours. I just want to consume this at some at some rate over time. So anyway, do this has been awesome. A ton of good tangents here. I think there's a lot of valuable stuff here. So for me to you. Thank you very much.

Justin Zizumbo:
Well, thank you.

Fern:
Cool. Anything else you wanna leave the listeners with?

Justin Zizumbo:
I would I I will. I wish I would shout it out. My buddy Casey Spencer, an offer. Are we still recording?

Fern:
We are still recording so shout out to Casey Spencer.

Justin Zizumbo:
He. He was. He found us. He coached for us for like three or four months and then had to move back to Arkansas. We both geek out on this podcast.

Fern:
Cool

Justin Zizumbo:
Good Coach.

Fern:
That's awesome.

Justin Zizumbo:
And then I hope and I this is just me chipping away. But I have a lofty desire to to be a seminar staff member someday. So after I level two Michel minutes was like, just pick the stuff that you're least good at. For me, it'd be like anatomy stuff. And start start chipping away at that. So I don't.

Fern:
I literally had a conversation about that today had coach was just like, I want to do this. And I said, well, what's the timeline like? Like, it's its own, you know. So start chipping away, man. And like and here's what I'll tell you. Regardless. Of whether that ends up coming to fruition or not. I would I would argue with almost aggressive nature that simply trying to achieve that will make you an incredible coach that will help you serve your community in the best way possible. So it's not I don't knows necessarily. It's about the in-state. I think it's far more about the journey, because if you're trying to do that, you're going to try to develop yourself as a as a as a leader, as a coach, as a as a professional and all those things. And either way, the result will be positive for you. So get after I dude.

Justin Zizumbo:
What are what are like the tangible steps? The level 3?.

Fern:
Yeah, so it's level 3 and in the internship and I'm not sure how that's going to change when the level 4 comes on. And that's kind of like a morphing deal. It morphs as things change within the company, but that's currently kind of the way it sits now is like level one, level two, level three intern. Go through that process. Maybe yes. Maybe no. Maybe come back later.

Justin Zizumbo:
So how do you intern?

Fern:
So the process is basically like you put in an application and then you pick some dates and you show up and there's there's a process within how that works and kind of like what you do when you kind of try out for the team. So my recommendation is like, don't do it if you don't have a significant amount of coaching underneath your belt because it probably won't go well.

Justin Zizumbo:
Okay like it coach tons and study for my little three.

Fern:
There you go, brother. My body. A lot to get out of here. Thank you again for your time. If you guys have questions about any of this stuff or questions for Justin in general about his affiliate, about re-branding, about some of the social work in addiction stuff. Here are some of the podcast DM best hour of the day on Instagram best hout of their day .com. And we will see you tomorrow.

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