136. Paul Tremblay | CrossFit NCR

136. Paul Tremblay | CrossFit NCR

On today episode Fern chats with Paul Tremblay. Paul has a very impressive resume in the Crossfit space. He owns CrossFit NCR with two business partners, opened back in 2013. Paul’s made it to the games multiple times as an individual and five times on the demo team, most recently this year with James Hobart. He’s been seminar staff since 2015. Also, Paul recently joined the Coaches Development Program team. – Yes, Paul is a pretty impressive dude. 

During the episode, Fern and Paul cover everything they can between how being an athlete helped him bee better coach, to his internship on staff. Along with having multiple members of the seminar staff team, not only work at his gym but co-owns it with him. They discuss what it’s like to have numerous owners running one box, making it successful so they can all make a living from it. 

Did you catch the exciting upcoming project that is in the works for the best hour of their day, that launching next year? – If so I hope you guess are as excited as we are. 

Timestamps: 

(1:56) Being on staff or making it to the games? (Games Talk) 
(7:35) Sactionals last year – New Games Format
(14:05) How was being an athlete helped you as a coach and in your affiliate? 
(15:38) Interning experience – overhead squatted a participant. 
(18:31) When did you decide you wanted to be a world-class coach?
(26:43) Having multiple members of seminar staff in your affiliate and how that changes the dynamic.
(29:11) Feedbacking in the affiliate coach to coach
(33:03) Owning an Affiliate with 2 other owners
(37:23) Making a successful affiliate?
(40:28) when you haven’t seen an athlete in a while?
(48:21) NCR Programming
(50:46) What could coaches do better n that 60min window?
(58:37) Yearly Goals 
(1:02:35) How do you get better as a coach?

Resources 

NCR podcast

NCR Programming 

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Fern:
All right, everybody, welcome back to the best out of their day Fern here I am here with my good buddy and longtime friend, Mr. Paul Tremblay. And if you guys don’t know who Paul Tremblay is you may have seen with the games. He’s meeting how many years have you done the demo team, Paul?

Paul Tremblay:
Oh, man. Demo team Five times. I’ve been on a demo team more than more times and I competed.

Fern:
Which one’s worse?

Paul Tremblay:
Like on the body or ego?

Fern:
Yeah,.

Paul Tremblay:
Not the ego, the demo team is pretty hard.

Fern:
Sure. Yeah, I think I totally get that. We’re like a you really just want to be on the other side of that. But like I I don’t. At the demo team doesn’t seem super fun a lot of the time. Like.

Paul Tremblay:
No. Like we. Yeah. I mean Dave put us through the ringer for sure. It was actually it was worse when we were in California because of the workouts where we’re being tested Hours or days before the event. Yeah. Whereas now, you know, you’ll have some people up at the ranch early in the area to test a bunch of workout and then come Madison, we’ll just tweak a few things. But it’s not that it’s not that physically demanding anymore.

Fern:
I’ll be sure to let Dave know so you can. Yeah. Yes. Yeah. So most of you guys are the Crossfit, mean like. Yeah. I know Paul. But so we’re not going to talk a ton about the games you’re going to talk about. So he is on the seminar staff. He is an affiliate owner in Ottawa.

Fern:
I say the right is in Ottawa. I can’t get that.

Paul Tremblay:
Ya Ottawa. You got it. I know. Yeah, right on.

Fern:
But he owns Crossfit, NCR. And how long have you owned your affiliate for?

Paul Tremblay:
2013. So early 2013. Right. Yeah. February. March.

Fern:
Ok. And then.

Paul Tremblay:
Coming up on Six, seven years.

Fern:
And then how many years on staff. I think about the same as me?

Paul Tremblay:
Four.

Fern:
OK. All right.

Paul Tremblay:
So yeah, I got on the staff in 2015.

Fern:
OK. OK. What? Because I was like 2013. Got it. OK. So I do have a question. Which one are you more proud of? You more proud of making it to the games or being on some of our staff?

Paul Tremblay:
Oh, man, what a question. That’s a great way to start. Man, all the honesty of making it to the games.

Fern:
That’s cool.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. Yeah, I think I think making it through the games I’m pretty proud of. I think. Looking back in a couple of years or in 10 years, 20 years, maybe all all different, different point of view or a different mindset.

Paul Tremblay:
But I think qualify for the Crossfit, games when I did in 2014 or 2012 and 2014, pretty damn proud of that pretty damn part of that athletic Accomplishment.

Fern:
I mean, you should be. I’m not I’m not downplaying the games at all, like that’s legit.

Paul Tremblay:
So, you know what, funny fern I mean, I have this conversation often with people close to me that, you know. What are you most passionate about? Is that you’re most passionate about coaching or are you most passionate about competing? And I don’t have an answer, really. It’s it’s tough for me. It’s a gray area. I love both so much and I get so much out of both that it’s I wouldn’t be able to say. And I think the answer sometimes is like, hey, if I had to pick one thing for the rest of my life, either coach people for the rest of my life, right. I’m either I can either train for the rest of my life.

Fern:
Well, the problem with that is one of those is not realistic, though. It’s like it’s kind of like a cheating, ya know

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. So maybe OK, give me for the next five years you can only train or only coach. I only train.

Fern:
I think that’s fair because you’re still quite capable of doing that. Like I’m well past. I was actually talking about this the other day with somebody. How? And I think. And you you might feel a little bit the same way, but probably not. So like I have kind of lost the passion for competing. And I think it’s largely due to the fact that, like I played basketball, like I was only ever involved in team sports. And I’ve I’ve missed that. Like, I don’t involve just punishing myself for no particular reason, like it was always because I was on a team and I know you played hockey, hockey,.

Paul Tremblay:
Hockey or hockey, whatever one.

Fern:
But like, if I was if like the only way I would like get back into training and like, really hit it hard as if I was on a team of some sort. Like that’s the only thing that would get me to like get up early, start training like like start like full blown weighing and measure my food again like this. I think that’s the thing. They’ll get me to do it.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. And if you relate that the Crossfit, and that’s probably what a lot of guys are good. Right. Like a lot of guys are going from that individual. Yeah. Competing to hey let’s just hop on a team. And that’s what can keep me going in training. But.

Fern:
I think you’re right. I think initially it was because people thought it was easier. But I don’t think that’s the case anymore.

Paul Tremblay:
No, it’s just not it’s definitely not it. Statistically speaking, it’s harder go to get to the games on a team than it is as an individual now. Right.

Fern:
Because there’s less opportunities.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. Less opportunity and less people to actually qualify. And you have to win an event or as you know, just winning your country or, you know, qualifying in the open or finishing 10th at an event that 10 games athletes are there and are qualifying out of you.

Paul Tremblay:
Not that that’s bad. Just there’s just less chances of getting there. But there’s something to be said about that, that team aspect of training man and you felt it in team sports. And I’ve never done any individual sports really aside from.

Fern:
I haven’t either.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. And golf. I’m not I’m not a good golfer. I just do it for fun. But, you know, competitively never done anything as an individual. So that’s why I like the Crossfit, individual career or whatever that I had. It was it was definitely some different.

Paul Tremblay:
But the beauty of that is you’re always trained with people or like even though you’re an individual, you’re always trying to train with other people. Do you still get that camaraderie aspect and, you know, you getting pushed in training so you’re you can almost feel like you’re on a team, but when you’re on the floor, you’re definitely not.

Fern:
Yeah, yeah. I just I just have a hard time like pushing past some of those like pain points cause I’m like, what’s this for? Like, I’m like, I’m going to win anything. Like nobody’s depending on me over here. So I’m just thinking. And I’m also just not that fit anymore. So that makes it easier not compete too.

Paul Tremblay:
The body has made the decision for you.

Fern:
Oh, yeah, I did. I’m totally fine with relative intensity these days. So your business partner, Pete Shaw, who I have on the podcast as well, just qualified for the games speaking that.

Paul Tremblay:
Ya He did in Argentina. Yeah.

Fern:
And are you are you gonna give it? Are you still giving it a shot? Like what is your goal to try to get there this year?

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah, it still is.

Paul Tremblay:
It’s it’s awkward, man. Like in my head, I I have these battles that, you know, do I still want to go? Do I still want to compete? Is it still like a real goal of mine? I think it is. Like, I just still really enjoy competing. Like the training aspect is fun. And I think I’ll always enjoy training and training with a purpose. But.

Fern:
Yeah,.

Paul Tremblay:
The competition aspect of being on the floor is just like such a. It’s a wild high. Yeah. I’m almost like addicted to it. And that’s why like I did so many sanctioned events last year just because I had so much fun.

Fern:
How many did you do?

Paul Tremblay:
I did four last year.

Fern:
That’s a lot dude.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah, I know. And it’s crazy because when they when they announced the sanctioned events, I’m like, this is stupid. Why the hell would you want to compete so much? Because I was always used to it. I would never do any other competition but regional.

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
And then hopefully the games. So, you know, I had that mindset of like, you can’t. Why would you compete so much in a year? And I remember these guys that would go to WodaPalooza and Dubai even before the sanctional event get all these competition under their belt before regionals. And in hindsight, I probably should have done that. I probably should have competed a little bit more.

Fern:
That’s an interesting. That’s an interesting take because there’s various other sports where you like. The Olympics is really like the closest thing where, like, you just trained for like one opportunity, like in every other sport. I’ve got a season like I want to play one of my pre-season, I’ve got my conference or whatever it is, and then I’ve got potentially the playoffs and then it’s a championship. And it’s like, I want you. I would never practice basketball like for a year to play one game and then hope that went well. I’ll be like, shit. Yeah. Like this is like flipping a coin. I could just have a bad game. So it’s interesting to hear you say that.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. That’s why I like I think the regional format, you know, Rest in Peace was so awesome, you know.

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
Stakes were so high. I yeah I did all the sanctioned events last year and no sanctioned event felt like regionals in terms of.

Fern:
Do or die.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. It was do or die. It was. And if you made it to the game, you was like you had one shot of going and did it like that. That’s why I like, you know, that’s huge. And that’s why the regionals was fun.

Fern:
But I do. I do agree that it does make it more exciting. I just. From an athlete standpoint, I’m like I just don’t know that it’s fair. Like, it’s just like man or some people that probably, you know, could be there and could perform well that are not. Which is why I do like the. Which is why I do like the sanctioned format. A lot more. But on that same token, like when you get to the games, like that’s the playoffs, like you don’t get us. I love the cuts like you like. That’s like so I look at sanctional is like, that’s your season. And you can have bad games throughout your season once you get to the games. Like you, I don’t I think you’ve lost the right to have a bad game. Like in the playoffs anywhere else. Like if you lose like it, like you just doubt, you know, just suck it up and get ready for next year.

Paul Tremblay:
See you later. Yeah. It’s become like. Qualifying for the games was like, oh, my God, that’s amazing. You’re going to the Games. That’s great. And now it’s like, oh, you qualify for the games. Cool. How far did you get?

Fern:
Yes. Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
How far did you get it at the crossfit the game? She was like, yeah, yeah. Your name on your jersey. But did you go home after one workout. Yeah. The end day like was not worth it. Yeah. I was talking this week and like I don’t know what I would if you told me you can go to the games but you’ll get cut first workout. I don’t know if I’d say yes. Like I don’t know if I would go, you know.

Fern:
I mean, yeah. I mean I get what they’re doing and I think long term it’s gonna be great. But I agree with you. I’m just kind of like man out there for one I got there. It’s like it’s like. Just get like if it’s one of those things where. Just get blown up on day one, it was like, man, I don’t like that was embarrassing, like what even show up here, you know?

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah, I would that would. I would. I’d feel terrible. And I know like I know some guys is that that happened. And they did feel terrible, you know, and there it’s fueled their season going forward, for sure.

Fern:
Well, and that’s why that’s why I think long term it’s a good thing that exposure is going to drive training and adaptation and a lot of those newer areas and countries, stuff like that. I think it’s gonna be cool. But yeah, definitely. It’s a funny way to look at it. You made it the games. Well, how far? Because that tells me something entirely different. It’s just like. Yeah. OK, cool. But I also think it’s cool because like, I like the fact that a lot of those old scenarios were like the leader can can basically like. Tank for a couple of days and then make it up on the back end just like me, and if you’re that bad at something like I don’t know that you should go to the next round.

Paul Tremblay:
So I mean, you give the lecture, right?

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
Be best across all.

Fern:
Listen.

Paul Tremblay:
And does everyone does it. If everyone doesn’t perform the same test.

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
You know, is it really. Oh do we really have what we have at the end of the weekend. I mean.

Fern:
Yeah, I think so.

Paul Tremblay:
Mat Faseer won. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Fern:
So I definitely think there’s like I think a lot of it doesn’t change, it just creates more excitement. So like I think they are largely largely there’s five to seven guys who are actually there to play and everybody else is there for potentially like making it another day. But yeah but yeah. But I do like the fact that like if one of those athletes, a Frazier or somebody else has a bad day, that like that could bump you out like. Yeah, I could. That could be it for you. Which I think is fair.

Paul Tremblay:
So anyway, I remember some von’s videos of seven’s like behind the scenes video that regionals and everything.

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah. Which one. Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
Oh he just used to go around it. Yeah. Yeah. Do you think you can win the crossfit games. And you just ask people and he was waiting for that one person say like no I don’t think I can. And to be really honest, like hey, no I don’t. You know what? I don’t think I can beat Frazier. Yeah. You know, the guys who were qualifying, I remember talking to him behind the scenes like, hey, and anybody said they can’t yet because that’s what they’re thinking.

Fern:
Yes.

Paul Tremblay:
Bullshitting like.

Fern:
You can see it in their eyes. Like, I mean, I’m sure I’m sure noah ohlsen is a is a good dude. But like this it from. From years of competing like, you know, two decades of competing at a pretty high level. What I saw. I’m not saying that’s accurate, but what I saw is like he actually wanted no business with that leader, that leader Jersey. Like he did not he was not comfortable being chased. That’s what I saw on its face on the floor. I get it, dude, because Frazier was the complete opposite. Look like you look like you would a knife does mom to to to win.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. I know exactly

Fern:
Nobody wants to be chased by that guy .

Paul Tremblay:
I think there’s definitely a couple of guys at the top that truly believe they can win it and it’s possible. But 90 percent of the games are the games athletes are like that.

Fern:
Now I’m just here. I guess some can’t be up.I’m just here to get some cool gear,.

Paul Tremblay:
Maybe lets just finish as high as we can.

Fern:
Yeah. Cool. So now. How, if at all, how hard being an athlete helped you as a coach and in your affiliate? Because I typically would look at that as almost a detriment.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah,.

Fern:
But I’m curious your thoughts are on the.

Paul Tremblay:
I think like so me qualifying for the games like six years ago now, almost. What it’s done for for me as a coach is it’s opened up a lot of doors. So like I was able to meet a lot of great people. And through that, like as soon as I had the opportunity to talk to someone that could get me on staff, I made it happen. Right. So. And I don’t think that those opportunities would have come if I hadn’t been in the game. Maybe they would have.

Paul Tremblay:
But in a different way. So, for example, like when I was at the game, the afterparty, I remember talking to E.C., you know, and I and I met you EC. We just started chatting. And then I said, hey, I’d love to get on stock since something I wanted to do and then Dave sent, email, you know, a couple e-mails down and a couple months later I have an internship and you know, actually. In terms of being an athlete and going to the Crossfit, games, the doors that’s open for. For me as a coach. That’s definitely yeah.

Fern:
I definitely think it’s I definitely think it’s one of those things where like if if that if you have aspirations to do other things and you don’t utilize that notoriety, I think that’s foolish.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah,.

Fern:
But it was the other question I have is, is it true that during your internship you overhead squatted a participant in one of the after parties or not after party. But one of the socials,.

Paul Tremblay:
YA Ya, intern one. And you know how it is like intern one that you got a you know, you just got to be there and.

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
And don’t be a nuisance and just be part of the team. And I knew Jason and I knew it. McDonald many of the other guys on Staff 2 already. So I was already very comfortable with everyone. Yeah, I was. I would think I was pretty much fresh off the invitational. So it was right after the invitational. So, you know, Crossfit, news the clean and jerk a shitload of weight, blah, blah, blah. Anyways, so these girls were like asking like, hey, can we take a picture with you? And like, yeah, take a picture. And then one girl is like, my friend wants you to overhead squatter. And I remember I’m an intern. I got the black shirt. I looked at Jason and he’s like, leaning back. You know, Jason’s like he’s like you guys like. Yeah ya sure go ahead.

Fern:
That raspy voice.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah, alright overhead squated couple of them. And then like two other girls were like, oh, I want you to do it to just before.

Fern:
I love here, I love here in Jomo to tell that story. He’s just like, yeah, I think Tremblay is gonna be a good addition to the team if he can make it thoght.

Paul Tremblay:
One of the internships is with Joe Motu and that’s the other funny one. It’s like he was into kettlebell a lot.

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
At that time and I was still like, you know, competing a lot. And I wanted to like train hard at lunch. And he like took out some kettlebell and we started doing my halo’s and stuff. And I know I’m a rookie. So I’m like, I shut my mouth and I just grabbed the kettlebell and I just doing Halo’s and whatever. And then we did like this little workout. I remember thinking like, what the hell? But shut your mouth and follow the follow the Flowmaster.

Fern:
That’s great. Yeah. So on that note, I think it’s funny when people don’t recognize that. Like they come on. Well, they recognize that, like your like sometimes your job is to follow other people’s lead, which is like, yeah, I’m like, I’m going to do my own thing. And I’m like, I’m probably not a good idea.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. And that doesn’t usually happen when people play sports their whole life. I know. They’re like team sport. Yeah. That team mentality that that you have on staff is very similar to what we had growing up in our team sport. So yeah, if you know, you got to know how to be a rookie, you gotta know how to take orders, even even though you know your role. He’s got to know you’re all you’re all going. You’re.

Fern:
So I want to talk. We talked about a little bit about it when I did the podcast with you and Pete in NCR podcast. But I wanted to dive a little bit deeper because I wanted to talk about. So it’s not a ton of people on some of our staff who’ve been to the games, like a handful, you know, like the games kind of as it currently exists. I mean, I mean, like post 2012 and kind of at what point did you kind of make that decision that you really wanted to be not just a good athlete, but you wanted to really dive into the coaching aspect to be like a world class coach?

Paul Tremblay:
MAn, When I when I did my my level one, I remember seeing the guys up there and thinking, you know, these guys are so good at what they do and you know how you feel at your level one. It’s like I wanted it to be the person giving that feeling to other people. Yeah. And I didn’t really think I did think, obviously, like I want to become a better coach and all that stuff. But I’ve always kind of thought that I would maybe make a teacher one day. So and I was kind of a path I was on originally in high school and a little bit in university. So it’s like when I saw that and I saw the guys at the front and how good they were and how it was molding fitness and teaching and coaching.

Paul Tremblay:
I was just thinking like this is this is something I gotta do.

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
So and in turn, how that helped my fitness it is is wildly invaluable like or you can’t put a value to it. You saying what what I think. Me getting on staff has done for for the gym just in terms of how many amazing people you meet.

Paul Tremblay:
Like everyone on staff, staff is just so awesome. You learn something every single weekend. You know, you’re you’re not the best coach on staff every single week and. Right. You’re getting feedback. And there’s something to be said of doing a job while someone is watching you. You know, no one’s watching you at your affiliate. You know, it’s just. People are just getting used to the getting to routines and, you know, just staying normal. Staying. Yeah. Not getting better as coaches. And it’s just that’s remotely impossible if you’re on it, even if you just work once a month, like I don’t work that often. You know, I got my my sheet in the mail idea that I’ve only worked sixty five seminars. I was actually kind of surprised like that’s not that much but a fifteen a year. And even with that, like what I’ve been able to learn and what I’ve been exposed to in terms of flow masters and coaches. And yet you’re all affiliate owners, too. Yeah. Every Saturday night. You’ve made this podcast, for example. Yes. Right. Like the Saturday night dinner. And you’re shooting this show with other affiliate owners, like the amount of ideas that I’ve had from the affiliate. And and how to develop new coaches and and bring people on board with you, like all of that just stems from, you know, basically having mentors that. Yeah, I have done it before me.

Paul Tremblay:
How do you when you. Because I always like to figure out, like, was there something that you did so because coaches always ask are like so obviously the question comes up. You know, I want to wear the red shirt. I want to be on staff. And when you kind of made that decision, like, was there something that you started doing in the affiliate? Every day they’re like, OK, this is what I need to get. Like, how did you start to essentially get better at, like, teaching, seeing correcting?

Paul Tremblay:
I I just think I just started thinking about it more. So one kind of big milestone for me was obviously doing my level two end up realizing that I was a shitty coach. So and and. Like, obviously, that was eye opening and coming back to the AFL, it’s always thinking like, I’m not that good. Yeah, I was just told and I was just shown what a good coaches like. I just saw it and this is not what I’m doing. So and that was basically it right there. The thing correcting issue was, was what we see on level twos. Right. And that’s usually the case. So that was the same thing for me. I remember often I had it with with Malleolo, Keto taking me and taking my hand through the circle and saying, like, what do you see in this sport? What you see and I remember thinking like, I’ve got nothing to say to this guy.

Paul Tremblay:
And I run an affiliate. I’m telling you, Malik, I run in this place.

Paul Tremblay:
I think I’m a good coach. Like, you know, we’re successful so far. So it was basically taking that with the actors, like I need to watch people move. And that’s when I started like really diving into the movements to how to make people better, like in that moment. Like I just started getting excessively. I’m going to watch someone move and I’m going to find something like I don’t think I had that sort of mindset before that. And that was that was a big turning point for me at that level. And realizing I’m shity and there’s always going to be someone better. And how do you get better? You just. Every single time you watch them and move, you got to think about it.

Fern:
The. I’ve always struggled with because people ask me the same thing and I’ll give them drills and different things to do. But I always I always come back to almost the same thing, which is you have to try harder. If the hot if to try harder as a coach and we see this at level twos is because I did. I’ve done two level teams in the past 10 days. I did. I just I just had like a 10 day trip right at level one on a weekend. No star level 2 on a weekend level. Amid all the one and the level two on the weekend and the level two participants, it was all the same.

Fern:
It was all they would coach for couple of minutes. And I’d be like, I think it’s good. And I would just ask them, could it be better? And they’re like, yeah, and I’m like, can keep going. And they’re like, where do I start? And I’m like, pick somewhere, just pick something. And if it’s not perfect, fix it, you know.

Fern:
And and just trying to get people to turn that light switch on that like, okay. Is not good enough. That is when that’s when I think you start to open up your eyes to like you watch people moving like, oh my God, I can fix so much more on all of these ample. And like just because it’s not a disaster doesn’t mean it’s good enough, but it’s it’s always a lot. Always been tough for me to like to express that to people.

Paul Tremblay:
What you what were you have and everyone on that has that exact same mindset. But with your coaching as well. Yeah. You know, everything that we say on the weekend, like we we do like I. Yeah. And I tell people like you got to watch where you’re looking for you got to you know what I’m telling you to be better at movement. I’m I try to look at the way I coach and I think of the class that I just gave. And I’m like, how literally how can I have made that one better? Like I was you know, it was Lauren having a good time in my class. I actually think about that. And I didn’t always think like that. And that’s what we kind of try and tell our coaches. And it’s really hard to tell part time coaches that and to have them have the same kind of passion and understanding.

Paul Tremblay:
But it has to go through your mind, like you have to ask yourself at the end of the class, and you’re right, that’s what you know. That’s the name of your podcast. Was that the best hour today? Could I have done better?

Fern:
Ya damn it. Yeah. And it’s it’s just something that I’d like some people just don’t. They don’t know what they don’t know. So we have to we have to like what you said, which is once once you saw somebody run a top notch class like it’s in again, it’s no different than like playing sports. When you when you go up against a hockey player or somebody who’s good at basketball, you’re like, oh, that’s really good. I can’t lie to myself about like where I’m at anymore. Like, why? Sure, she can’t do that like that. I’m not that capable. So I gotta get back to work. And I think the key has always been what I’ve always tried to do is like constantly trying to. Get that feeling over and over like it, which is kind of weird, is like consciously trying to put myself in a position where I feel inadequate, but all because all it does is drive me to be a better coach. Just like what? At what point am I going to no longer feel that way? I don’t know. Probably never, because it’s just not in my nature.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. We have we have something a little bit on on that same mindset or thought processes like at the gym. We have obviously Pete and myself and then we have another partner.

Paul Tremblay:
Rezz the left side of the gym with actually read. Then I started the gym.

Fern:
OK.

Paul Tremblay:
We brought Pete on later on. He’s actually on kids stuff. And the other day we’re talking about like, you know, why is the gym successful and where could be better and what can we do to change the ball a lot? And I feel like I see the gym is really good because we’re in constant competition.

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
And the Rezz was like, what do you mean? I’m like resident when you’re in my class. I want to give the best class possible because I want you to see it. And I’m thinking like, I want to be a better like I want to be a better coach. Yeah, like I want to be a better coach then Pete. Just like I want to be a better athlete then Pete . Yeah. You know, it’s like. And I’m I’m extremely happy if he is a better coach to me or or tries to be as well. But. Yeah. Competition. Yeah. So like if I’m just stagnant or just getting used to the way I coach classes are used to my members then Rezz and Peter getting an edge on me, you know. So like that’s kind of how I’m thinking. I always want to impress them. If they’re in my class, I want to impress them. If any of my coaches in my class want them to leave the classes and like, holy shit, that was an unreal class.

Fern:
No,.

Paul Tremblay:
That’s why I asked myself that after that. Was it an unreal class?

Fern:
Yeah. Now that you’re bringing that up. I do that. So you get you so you have three coaches at your facility there on some of our staff. I have myself and another coach. Cassidy’s OK. Is my head coach here? And now that you say that, I. I do that, too. Yeah. He might not even be in the class. He might just be in the gym and I’ll be like, I’m going to try to smash this class and then nag like I want like I want them to walk away thinking, almost thinking like, I don’t know if I could do that.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. You know what? Let’s take that even deeper. I think about that. And then I’m like, well, wait a minute. Just about me or about know my members, you know. But then I’m like, well, wait a minute, if I want to give the best working class possible, that means everyone in the class will benefit from.

Fern:
Yes, exactly.

Paul Tremblay:
Ya know, So it’s like obviously the relationship is, but it almost state it only starts out like this selfish need of being the best coach possible.

Fern:
Well, but I think it’s it is selfish, but it’s kind of not selfish. So I think there’s a difference between like like I want to compete and I want to win versus like I’m doing this so that everybody will recognize me. And I don’t think that’s where like have competitors. True competitors don’t think like that. But like in my mind, like losers, things like that, like they’re like, oh, I want people I want people to shower me with with love and affection. I don’t actually care. What I do care about is like I want to compete, like if nobody sees this one on one competition that we have. And I’m totally cool with that. But like, it just it like it gets me fired up. So so do you guys regular give each other feedback at the at the facility.

Paul Tremblay:
To each other? Not that often. Not not often. And unlike our classes, mainly because we do get a lot of feedback like during our seminar stuff like. Yeah. So, you know, we leave that to the weekend. We do give each other feedback on like other things, obviously. Like we all have our different jobs at the gym. Like Reggie takes care of all the programming pieces, all the class planning. And I’m kind of behind the scenes and the social media and stuff like that’s all through each other like that. Like a thought of trying this or doing that.

Fern:
Yep.

Paul Tremblay:
We’ll give a lot of feedback to the coaches at the gym. We have a seven or eight other coaches. One of them is full time. So we’ll give them a lot of feedback and we’ll organize like every every once in a while, like a full week of of like feedback sessions where. So us three we we’ve kind of established that that mentor mentee relationship that we don’t have on staff just at the gym. So Pete’s got, you know, two or three of our coaches. I have two or three and then got it done. So we kind of take care of our group. But yeah, to each other, not that much.

Fern:
All right. Yeah, we don’t we don’t either. It’s more it’s more just it’s more like in passing. It said it’ll be a question of, hey, how did you do this in your class? Like more or like, hey, I was just walking through this this progression that I’m trying out, like, try it out and let me know what you think. Like, I don’t know if it’s gonna work or not, stuff like that. But yet it’s it’s much less to at least to me. And I like that kind of like official feedback. It’s more so I do that with some of the other coaches, though, are just kind of pulling to the side and, you know, run through a lesson plan with them or stuff like that.

Paul Tremblay:
Something little more frequent. I don’t know if you do this as often as your class and sometimes I won’t be happy with like something I did or how something went and all like, I’ll go fishing for that. Like, I’ll go and talk to Peter, if you like. What would you guys like? What did you do here? Yeah, I tried this and like, I didn’t like it. How did you coach this morning or whatever without them necessarily like seeing it or being there? So yeah. And being able to bounce ideas with people and just. Yeah. Going back and forth is huge. I don’t understand how people run affiliate’s by themselves like it so hard.

Fern:
That would be. Well I do because I used to do it and it was lonely man. It was not just like that. Only like I’m here by myself. Like it was like mentally lonely just like me and I don’t have anybody to like to answer with to bounce ideas off of, to be creative, to like to challenge my thought process on things and to to provide some other input on things. How do you. So so so you guys have three owners at the gym.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah.

Fern:
So that’s pretty rare.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. It is so lucky,.

Fern:
So my my my first question is who, who, who was on seminar staff first you or pete?

Paul Tremblay:
Me

Fern:
OK. Do you have it? You have the authority there.

Paul Tremblay:
A little bit.

Paul Tremblay:
But he’s caught up. He’s caughting up.

Fern:
No, but my.

Paul Tremblay:
He’s caught up on Seminar for sure.

Fern:
Yeah, that. So my question is, I’m not actually. I don’t know that I’m aware of any affiliates that have three owners. So that’s a unique scenario. And I know right out of the gate, you know, we don’t talk numbers, but, you know, first first year, if you know anything about running an affiliate, you’re like, okay. So, Jeff, first of all, they generate enough revenue to pay three people and a head coach. And then secondly, how like how does that split work? Not, not not in regards to percentage, but how do you have essentially three cooks in the kitchen? And how do you balance that relationship of like this is your swim lane? This is my son Lee and this is your son?

Paul Tremblay:
Well, first of all, someone told me to get a partner when I first wanted to open up a gym. And I think that’s

Fern:
really?

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. One of the best advice I received. And you say, huh? Right. Those people say like, no, I’ve made, you know, watch out for partners. You know, it’s like a marriage and it can end badly. All you hear about is these terrible stories and knock on wood. We don’t have any yet. But. And I’ve had this chat with an affiliate owner in Ottawa when he was talking. And he’s like, oh, we got you guys. You’re lucky. You know, you guys are to years. You guys are you have a partner. I might do that. Has nothing to do with luck. What are you lucky at? Here’s what I’m lucky for. I’m lucky that we get along so well. But it was a conscious decision to go out. You get to go out and get a partner. So that was that was 100 percent. I did not want to get into it by myself, and I don’t think I had the knowledge or the expertise in Crossfit, to do it by myself. Right.

Paul Tremblay:
So I needed to fill that void and that’s what resonated for me. He was more experienced in Crossfitters, a better coach, you know. So that’s why we molded the two and it was awesome. But. The roles, the roles in How Do You Stay your own lane? That’s a really good question, man, because honestly, up until. Recently. We haven’t really set. Real lines.

Fern:
So which makes it even more interesting. Which means you guys you know,.

Paul Tremblay:
I know I know.

Fern:
You guys are kind of living off of like the good dude rule, which is like we’re all good and we like each other. We can sort this out. Yeah, OK.

Paul Tremblay:
In terms of like some personal like back end stuff like percentage or percentages and that’s.

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
So if only about recently that we started paying each other different wages. Different salaries.

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
So just based on the work and the amount of classes that that the people were doing, because I think that’s another thing that Affiliate owners don’t do, they don’t pay themselves for classes. Man. And so we like. Okay. So these are the classes because this is the stuff that we do outside. And for a little while it was it was basically even so we figured out like, hey, you do this. I do this. He does this. That’s even across the board. So we’ll add, you know, X amount of dollars on top of all the classes that we coach and their salaries. So, yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
And then it was when we started. So for the programming we did for a long time, I would program three weeks Reza would programs for three weeks and Pete permanently reason that we finally decided that just give it all to Reza. And it was when we also decided to sell the NCR program and just have more of a streamlined process. We said, okay, well, he’s going to take care of this. I’ll take care of this portion and then we’re going to take care of that. And so to be honest, it’s been. It was a little wishy washy. Who was doing what for a long time? Yeah. And then finally, we were able to just, you know, set some sets in, some real parameters. But having said that, since the beginning, I’ve always been the back end guy. The the the the again, the book keeping the membership management software. But and Reza always been, you know, answering emails face to face programming.

Paul Tremblay:
And so on that note. So you guys have that kind of like spa style between the three of you and everybody is kind of not like probably what there is where their skill set lies. And then from a standpoint of.

Fern:
What do you think it makes in? Like, what do you think makes this a successful affiliate? Like, obviously you guys are doing it like you guys are meeting like. And like, I really get bent about that statement, which is like we run a successful affiliate and I’m like, what does that mean? Well, if you’re if you’re making a living running your affiliate like that’s a successful affiliate. So clearly you guys are doing that. But what do you think? Is it that makes you guys a successful affiliate? Or maybe not even you guys, just like in general, like, you know. Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
It’s funny because I think like, yeah, we’re a successful affiliate, but man, we could be so much more successful.

Fern:
Yeah, different conversation. So I agree with you. It’s like which which which we can encapsulate by literally everything we’ve talked about prior to this. So. Yeah. Yeah. You’re a foregone conclusion.

Paul Tremblay:
So successful affiliate. I really enjoy the fact that we’re like you said it like we’re being able to create a living for for more than one person. So there’s essentially four of us that live off the gym.

Paul Tremblay:
Off your gym? Like, I don’t care if you have 100 members or 500 people consistently showing up for gym every day. That’s the number that I look at every single day. How many people walk through the door? And then I put that on my top number of members. How many is that? It’s 50 percent. Is it 60 percent? We only see 35 percent of our members today. And on a daily basis, we see over 50 percent like to me. I think that that’s one thing that makes a successful affiliate are people coming?

Fern:
I don’t.

Paul Tremblay:
After for that.

Fern:
Yeah, I don’t think enough. Ugh, You bring that up. Like I’ve always I’ve always seen like the numbers in the past were like roughly 40 percent a day. But I would I would d that 50 percent is pretty high.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah.

Fern:
Like and I bet you I bet you there’s not a lot of people that track that, to be honest with you.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah.

Fern:
When did you start? When did you guys start tracking that? I over.

Paul Tremblay:
Start tracking that on a unofficial basis. Well, we actually just started having people sign into classes. So for a long after a long time and even asked people to sign into classes. We only started that maybe like two years ago.

Fern:
OK.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. We don’t have a cap on classes. There were just like, wow, people sign it. Yeah. And I was I was very on top of who owed money and bills and like that. We need that. But once I started losing track of that and, you know, more members in the gym, you just need to have more of of of a process. There is just no way of tracking anything if you have people signing into your gym.

Fern:
Right. You have that number. That is for sure. The other thing. So if you’re tracking attendance, you’re obviously tracking people who are absent. And then like what? What are you guys doing with those people that you haven’t seen in however many days it is?

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. Are you looking for a charger?

Fern:
Yeah,.

Paul Tremblay:
I’m looking for mine too I’m Gonna go find my too.

Fern:
That’s always important rights, like something that like most people don’t. Like I would I would venture to say like that is like a major flaw for a lot of Crossfit, gems is there? There like that’s where like the Globo jet. Another global gems were the orange theories of the world probably do significantly better. Is like also losing that process for doing that. I was. It’s funny that you brought that up because it was actually something I was digging into earlier today because like, I’ve never been super happy with some of the tracking. Metrics in some of those software systems, because it doesn’t it’s not always the easiest to find out if so-and-so hasn’t been here in a week. And yes, I understand that. Well, if you know your members, you should just remember and I’m like. OK, cool.

Fern:
In theory, however, like, I’ve got a billion things going through my mind and I’m not on the floor if every single class. So how in the hell am I supposed to remember? Eighty five people that it’s just not realistic. So I’m consciously trying to figure out a better way to like systematically, because then you run to the other thing, which is like people don’t want to check in. That’s like, God damn it, that’s so hard. So what are you guys do?

Paul Tremblay:
Well, what we did for. It’s been a process man, like, obviously, every new member that walks in. And that’s just the way that we do things. So they don’t have an issue that to that.

But the it’s basically we just set up an iPod, represent a whiteboard. And I just read the name on the board that’s on the iPod. And if it’s if your name is on the wall, well you didnt sign it. And trying to sign in or you don’t get a score on the board, then then it’s like yes or no. During the warm up, others look at attendance and while we find it. Yeah. Hey, you didn’t sign in. And that’s that’s the beauty of it. Oh, yeah. Well, you know, my bill is due. Yeah, I know.

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah. [Laughing]

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. I’m very aware of that actually. Yeah. So. And we’re talking about like data and tracking like a lot of. It’s it is it is hard and you kind of have to dig in their membership software to go find some some important information. But yes, people weren’t showing up. But also like the people that have were the people inside your gym. Three months ago. Like, how many of those people are still there like that? You know, that churn rate or a year ago or six months. And there’s a lot of like. Reports and changing this and dates and that night in the membership software like is give me that number, you know that I think that’s a super valuable statistic to have like an in a percent Yeah. Percent form. And I think the Crossfit, Gym would probably be a little bit higher than the normal gyms obviously, but would be surprised like there’s a pretty there’s still a pretty big turnover rate like even in our gym. And we have a lot of members. We. I mean people leave. People move. People cancel the memberships. Yeah. I think it’s too expensive. You know, or new people come. So, yeah, that statistic is very important. Like where do you spend your money on getting new members or keeping the ones that you have?

Fern:
Yes and

Paul Tremblay:
And we’ve probably heard this like it’s way cheaper to keep nute, keep members and it will get new. But at the other day, people are gonna leave. So you still have to go out there and search for new members.

Fern:
Yeah. Which is a tough topic. In the end, the answer is just like everything else in Crossfit, is like you have to do both. Have to do everything possible to keep who you have. But you absolutely not ignore the fact that like if you’re not developing. You know, the the subset of sales and bring in new people like you are in deep shit like because we can all we can all hang or how to like we have the best coaching of a great community. We have like, you know, really low churn rate, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. But I mean, that is the nature of the gym business is turnover like it’s like it’s it’s one of those things where like when you look at it and you look at like how often you’re gonna have to resell or replace somebody, it’s almost you look at as much as you like. Why would anybody do that for a business?

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. Like that. Was it worth it?

Fern:
What do you mean? They’re all going to stay for three months. And like we have people that have been with us for years. I mean, like I would say, most of our the bulk of our Meurs with us. So like more than three years. \Yeah. But we do have the other ones that are here for like six months and then they’re just not for me anymore. And my God, like how did we fail on that? Like, what did we not deliver. Know wonder.

Paul Tremblay:
Like what? How can someone be so into Crossfit, and fitness and working out for like three, four or five months and then stop. I don’t know what happened. I don’t like how do you not like and they’ve seen the benefit like you’ve seen it happen, like someone comes for a year, loses a shitload of weight, feels great, comes all the time and then just like fizzles out and not doesn’t just go to the gym. Just stop.

Fern:
Stops. Yeah, I don’t. I think my thesis on that is like they didn’t love it or they didn’t feel wanted in the community. Right. So like the reality is like we we both have been running in filius long enough to know that most people don’t leave Crossfit, gyms because they had like a bad experience. They leave because they, for whatever reason, became indifferent to the experience absence of the exercise. Meaning like they. I don’t know, name any number of weird things that are kind of like intangible, like nobody said their name enough times or like we didn’t reach out and text them and ask them why they weren’t there or, you know, they had a they didn’t get a PR for a while. And in reality, like we both know that that doesn’t even really matter because they dropped, you know, twelve pounds of body fat. So I think that’s why. And it’s like sometimes it is really tough. And we all and we get emotionally attached to that. Where does a God man like, you know, like you’re gonna. You don’t know you like you’re going to regret that at some point, right?

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah, and it’s hard to not take that personally as well. Right. So like men getting they’re getting results. They seem like they’re enjoying it. And then I just start thinking like I do something like.

Fern:
Yes.

Paul Tremblay:
It’s like a breakup. Like, is it me? Yeah. And I think honestly, like after a little while, a couple years of owning the gym. I still think about that, but I have to let that go. Yeah. You know what? Maybe it is. Maybe it is. Maybe it was you. Maybe you just didn’t like you. And that’s the nature of these small businesses that were built on community. And it is very, very possible that people come to your gym for a couple of months and they realize that poor guy. I I you know, I don’t really like him.

Fern:
He’s too intense, you know?

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah, maybe. Yeah. So I’m gonna go somewhere else and that’s totally fine. Go go find the community that you enjoy that makes sure that you keep moving.

Fern:
Yes. And now I’ve I’ve I have always said this and I will always said this I would prefer that somebody does Crossfit, in somebody else’s facility than not doing it. Like if you left my facility and you had one of two options, which was not do it or do it at somebody else’s facility, 100 percent of the time I’m taken to doing it somebody else’s facility, like I would just prefer that.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. And then you hear where they go and you’re like, noooo why?

Fern:
So on that note. So you guys so NCR Crossfit, ya you guys offer affiliate. We guys also offer like a multiple multiple tracks of programming and it’s in your programming. What do you guys like have a goal in your programming. Like what are you trying to achieve in your programming either for the affiliate or the athletes for those coaches.

Paul Tremblay:
So for our goal for the affiliate is just to make their lives easier. And just like like any other affiliate programming that’s out there, which is a lot of you research, everyone selling affiliate programming, and it’s the kind of use that affiliate models to build a connection with them. You know, you try to build a connection with your members. I like to build a connection or try to with the affiliates that are on board. And I know that that, you know, on us on a larger scale, that’s probably not possible. But we’re still super small ya know. And we try to do is just we want. We want affiliates to run better boxes like we want them to just find a way to to help them find a way to give a better product. Not that they’re not giving a good product with, but just helping them with that. And it’s hard. It’s it’s hard because, you know, programming is programming and. Yeah. And it really doesn’t matter what program you’re following, but it’s it’s the structure of the class and making sure that, you know, it’s programmed accordingly with the warm up with the skill and that, you know, in the planning of that class that there’s a proper progression and that there’s a nice flow to the class. So our goal and you see I’m just talking about the affiliate ’cause basically that’s all I care about. Yeah. Like, I want I want people on the NPR program as individuals. But what that creates is that person doing that work out by themselves in the corner of another person’s gym and I don’t like that.

Fern:
Yeah, no, I agree. And I ask because we’re getting ready to to launch our programming. And I feel like we’re going to launch best hour of their day. And I mean, it’s gonna be entirely affiliate based. We’re gonna have individual track programming if they want it. But I don’t. Yeah, I don’t particularly care about that. What I want to do is the same thing you do. Which is I want people to have like the best out of their day, and I think. People could do better there. And it’s not because they’re not trying to do a good job, it’s because they don’t know any better. Like we already discussed. What is it? I guess two questions.

Fern:
The first one is what do you think it is? Most affiliates and coaches could do better in that 60 minute window.

Paul Tremblay:
What could they do better? They could coach.

Fern:
All right. So, Ally, I think you would be. Leslie Fantasia.

Fern:
Yeah, for sure.

Paul Tremblay:
But it’s actually to be to not just being gauged for the hour, but to actually coach to give people. You know, tangible things to do in their movement to help them better. It’s to help them better or it’s just, you know, to actually watch them move see and correct and, you know, help them. So it’s it’s a stupid answer and it’s a quick one, but it’s just a coach more like you where you’re not just explaining the work workout at the whiteboard. You gotta you gotta get in there. You got to. You know, during the warm up, you gotta to talk to them. You’ve got to watch them move, you know, during the workout, everything. So I think one of the reasons why we give that course outline is not necessarily like, hey, follow this to a T. Minute by minute. It’s just to give reminders like, hey, we’re t.k. We’re going over this today. Here’s the suggested progression here. Things to look for. It’s like like, oh, if a person doesn’t do that already, they’ll read that as a coach and be B. Oh. OK, then I’ll start looking at that and maybe I’ll see some more. It’s just a reminder like get in there. Like every rep is an opportunity for you a coach to jump in. And that’s that’s kind of a goal there. What could they do better? Coach, get in there.

Fern:
I think I asked that question. I knew what you’re going to say. But I ask you is I think it’s important to people. To hear that specifically coming from somebody like you who you know is a competitive athlete who has lived a large part of their Crossfit, life doing probably pretty high volume training and but still understands and graphs what should be happening in a 60 minute window and what the effect on that in on your members is, because I would agree. You know, if we were just down in Raleigh and, you know, we had awesome experience it at every gym that we went to, went to 10 gyms in four days. But I want to add the same thing. And like, man, I’m like, what’s happening here is amazing. Like people are getting fitness, they’re losing weight, they’re having a good time. I was like, what? They could all. They could all get coached a little bit better. And I and I and some people might be listening to this and thinking like, well, it’s kind of a dick thing to say. It’s not like it’s the truth. Like in my affiliate as well. Like we can always do things better. And that is like the goal. Right. And I think that if we would if affiliates would look at what their service is and treated the same way we do in the level to which is like, hey, we’re not calling you out because you’re a bad person.

Fern:
We’re calling you up because it could be better. Right. It’s nothing. It has nothing to do with you. Like, it’s just being there is a you could be more efficient, like you could say this better. You could, you know, run through this progression faster or you could explain it a little bit more clearly, like you could do all of those things. And I don’t think enough of us put it like a like a fine enough kind of like lens on that aspect of the you know, everybody’s like we have great programming, like the facilities is great. We got skiers and we got all this other crap. And I’m like, cool.

Fern:
I don’t care. I don’t care, you know.

Paul Tremblay:
And you’re also. You know, some from your point of view. You’re also trying to coach better, right?

Fern:
Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
You’re also during your class at the end of your class. Like I said earlier, like you look back, you’re like, did I actually coach everyone? Did I give everybody a little something? And, you know, I can think back in my class this morning near the end of men that those people in the corner, like, I didn’t get to them as much as I wanted to. You know, and I remember thinking like, damn it, myself.

Fern:
Yeah, I felt the same way the other day I was teaching. I was shocked. I was like, I’ve been playing around with like different like I’ve been trying to come up with like different progressions to teach the skiegrs cause it’s like it’s fairly intuitive and it’s like, yeah, you can get on there and just pull, but. Most people don’t do it very well. And I’m like, man, how can I get these people to do this right and learn to like, you know, move their hips and then their hands, even though they already know that, but they’re not doing it here for some reason. And it’s like walking. And I was like in there by myself, like doing it and like. And then I try to the next class and like na that didn’t work out and really like it. Like, I got to find a better way to do this. You know,.

Paul Tremblay:
Hey, you’re trying different things. It’s amazing. And it’s like sometimes I think that, you know, I answer your question by saying they should coach. Like like you said, they could be listening to this and say, what a dick. Like, we literally do everything that we tell our participants to do. Yeah. Like in terms of just trying to think about getting better and looking for faults and seeing correcting and all that jazz like we do it, too. And so it’s like I could be a better coach. And if if the experience that I have, I can put on paper and send it to the affilicate owners to say, hey, read this. This is how I would lead this class. Hopefully this helps. And that’s you know, that’s the service that we self that we offer.

Fern:
That’s cool. Yeah.

Paul Tremblay:
And it has enough affiliates worldwide that. You know, it’s not a saturated market or there’s no there’s 15000 athletes it and a lot of them need help. A lot of them need help.

Fern:
I think I think collectively we all could use helping in some aspect or another, like nobody’s immune to it. And it’s just like, I know what works for you the best. And, you know, like. And we like it best are their day. Like, we never really intended to write programming because, you know, it’s just kind of like loudy. Right, programming. We’re not, like special. Like most people to do that or like games level folks. And I’m like, what’s that the point? I want to send people to the games. I’m like, I know how to run a fucking good class. Like, I also know how to write lesson plans and I know how to put together progressions and I know where people get tripped up in their classes. Right. So it’s like we I look at it this way as it’s like we’re going to like our programming. Largely what yours is to what it sounds like is I’m designing a program that gets people fitter and develops your coaches simultaneously. Right.

Fern:
So I’m actually I’m actually chasing the coaches via the programming because that is the fundamental thing that we all have to navigate every single day, which is like you come in, there’s a workout and like everything is built on top of the workout. Like whatever it is, it’s like the experience that built some of the workout. The lesson plan is built on top of a workout. The coach’s ability to see, teach incorrect and group manage group is all built on top of that workout. So for me, it’s like I don’t really care about the workout, like. To some extent, it’s really hard to write shitty programming like, you know, just like it. Yeah, you know, it’s like it’s it’s fairly simple if you keep it simple. But but like, we’re gonna build everything on top of that. So it sounds like us like you guys are doing, which is like, you know, giving coaches something to think about, which is like, hey, use this burgner progression and or try this handsand push up progression or stuff like that. So that’s cool. That’s what I think. Yeah. And I think there is I think there is a lot of people that are just giving programming but not giving the coaching aspect of it.

Paul Tremblay:
And I are although give coaching notes or whatever and talking about stimulus. But like I mean a lot of people can do that right there. There’s a lot out there. So it’s you’ve got to shop around and see what what kind of value you’re getting for them, for your. You’re for sure.

Fern:
That’s really cool. Do you guys have any do you guys do you guys do any like yearly goals for the gym, for the affiliate?

Paul Tremblay:
No, no, no. I have a number. I have a number of athletes that I’d like to be at, but not on a yearly basis. Like, yeah, I feel like I we can we have the capacity for another. One hundred members.

Fern:
What are you at now?

Paul Tremblay:
Like three hundred and thirty.

Fern:
So I love that you said that because I have I have this weird, probably grandiose belief that every Crossfit, gym can have four athletes. Now, I don’t know. I don’t how to do that, but I do think that’s a real scenario.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. And here’s my math. You have you see 50 percent of people on a daily basis. So you have 400 members. You have 200 people walking through your door. You have you have 20 people per class. Ten classes, a bomb. Anybody can have four remembers. What is stopping you from having 400 memembers?

Fern:
You.

Paul Tremblay:
Not size. Exactly. It’s not size of the facilities, not the equipment that you have. You can have 10 class the day, 20 people in every class. And run a good affiliate in five thousand square feet, three thousand square feet. Ten thousand. It doesn’t matter. So, yeah. So 400 is definitely doable. It’s possible, but yeah, it’s if you it’s it’s the affiliate and it comes back to when you’re asking like, what makes you guys a successful affiliate? A lot of affiliates are going to say this the man. We haven’t. We have unreal coaches. It’s just like we spend so much time developing ourselves as coaches, developing our our new coaches through our internship process, and everyone will say like, yeah, we have an internship for us, that’s cool. It’s great to have one as good as ours. Yeah. And in my head.

Fern:
I think you guys can say that because like your coaches now have credentials, like they’ve been vetted through the highest levels. Right. And I think that’s different than we like. Underbody says they have great coaches. But my question is always like based on what you think they’re great? That’s like that’s like me being like, I’m handsome because my mom says I’m handsome. Yeah, my mom loves me. And I could be, you know, cross-eyed. You should be like, you’re the best. You’re my mom. I’m. My mom would be like, you’re my favorite son. A big mom. I’m your only son.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah,.

Fern:
Whatever. You know, you’re the best. You know, I think it’s like we have to stop looking at our are our own affiliates through rose colored glasses and be like.

Fern:
Are my coaches really that good? Or am I just saying that because it makes me feel good?

Paul Tremblay:
You know, what I often think first is I’ll think if I put this coach in front of Jason or in front of Austin coaching a class, what would they think? Would I be embarrassed? Would I be happy? Would I be proud? And that’s sort of process. I think, like then it’s if I’m not happy with that, then it’s my job as a affilate owner to make sure that this person is good, not just for the product that we’re offering, but just. Well, basically, actually for that for the product that we’re offering. Am I am I proud of this?

Fern:
I feel the same way. And I look at a little bit different, like even on a more like egregious scale, which is. Anybody that says that, I’m like, would you be willing to flip on Facebook alive and just have your whole class for the world to see? Kind of like there’s a lot of people that would. Fucking backpedal real quick. If I was like that, like and I feel like we could do that, but I’m also fully aware that we could be better and there would be absolute legit legitimate criticism of what we do and that’s OK. But but I’m not embarrassed of what people would see. I can’t be like you’re gonna see a great class that is just like anything else that could be improved and that because that at no point is that not a scenario. But at any time since we have great coaches, I’m like, how great is great like you when you can put that on the old interwebs and see if it’s great or what?

Paul Tremblay:
Like, you know, I think you ask me a good option during the podcast, if I remember correctly when we did it with Pete and was like, How? How do you get better as a coach? Like you say, like get better, get better, you know? Like, how do you do that? How does someone do that at their affiliate by themselves without the luck of getting on staff and being exposed to all the great trainers in the world, like and seeing all these people squatting and deadlifting that aren’t your regular members. How do people actually go out and get better?

Fern:
I think I actually don’t think it’s hard. I just think it’s. The same way you and I got better at hockey and basketball, and I don’t know how much film you watched of yourself playing hockey, but I watched somebody watched you play hockey. Like I know I watched endless hours of film, of basketball, of myself. Not because I wanted to see myself play basketball. Because I analyzed every possible thing that was going on on the court at any given time. And I don’t think there’s any reason people can’t do that for their Crossfit, classes. You know, like set up a go pro in the corner and just watch yourself coach your class. Even if you don’t know anything about what you’re looking at, I guarantee you you would find something to critique yourself on.

Fern:
Yeah, I 100 percent guarantee you would be like I talk too much or this logistical layout was a nightmare or I was late simply because the clock on the wall in this video says that I started the class at 5 0 3 and it’s the class starts in 5. So I think, you know, I don’t think people should rely solely on video, but it’s a pretty powerful tool just to like just smash yourself, you know.

Paul Tremblay:
So watch yourself and get other eyes on you. But that’s also what I find.

Fern:
Well, that’s the point, right? Is like if I can watch the video, I can give it to anybody else to watch it. Like you can you can put an hour’s worth of video on Vimeo, like you’d have to go home and download it, but like whatever you want to get, better or not, as my question, I let this shit upload overnight and then send it to somebody you like. Watch this. I’m like, you know, like and any one of us would be happy to do that. So that’s that’s what I think people to do. I don’t think people are seeking it out. That’s that’s my personal opinion.

Paul Tremblay:
So we get comfortable they’re comfortable in their filter or they’re afraid of us or they’re afraid of finding out that they’re not that good like you and I both did at some point. Where does I got I suck at this like I should get better.

Paul Tremblay:
You know what a realization changed my life, changed my life. So it just it made everything different. Made everything different. Like when I realized I was a shitty coach.

Fern:
Yeah. I mean, and I keep telling myself that. Yeah, every day I’m like like these people really pay me for this. Some days I feel like that. But like, that’s a sliding scale, right? Like, it’s like my bad day is not the same as somebody else’s bad day and vice versa. Yeah. Yeah. My goal is to never seem to like good.

Paul Tremblay:
You say sometimes you finish your costume like I thought that I destroyed that.

Fern:
Oh, yeah. You know, yeah, there’s some date is the opposite is just like God. I’m like, that was the greatest cause of all time. Everybody got fitness on, had fun. I’m on.

Paul Tremblay:
It’s just like just like when you think you have a great class or a bad class, like, I don’t know. I know how much people actually see that or realize it, you know, because like sometimes I’ll finish your class. I go to my wife. She’s like, we’re trying to like that. That shit was like, yeah, you know, this happened. And that she’s like, well, I think everyone had a great time. Like I had nobody noticed any of that. So you’re fine.

Fern:
Well, that’s why that’s why I think I think at some point other people don’t notice it because the skill set gets to a point where like with the things that you notice. Are not noticeable to the untrained eye.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. Does that help you kind of let go of a lot of things, right?

Fern:
No, because I still judge myself on it. I’m just like I’m like, that’s unacceptable. Like what? Like. Like what? That shouldn’t happen, I’ve been doing this too long. And then I’m like, every. You’re always gonna like it. Nobody’s immunes that it’s gonna happen. But I think it was. I think it was James who Hobart who hit me with this one. And this was about seminar. But I took it into my classes, which he was giving me some feedback on, like running groups and just lectures in general. And I don’t know, I don’t think it was anything specific to me, but it was just kind of more like a lesson, which is like, listen. Mistakes happen. Right. Like you’re gonna be over, you’re gonna be under. Like you’re gonna forget things like all of that is part of the whole process. He goes, that’s not what’s important or kind of like what I think his words were like. That’s not what I’ll get upset about. He’s like, I’ll get upset if you don’t know why. If you’re just kind of like aimlessly floating around and you don’t know why your glass was late or why your lecture is over or why you’re so are like you, you don’t know that your group is running, over he goes. Now we have a problem because there is a lack of awareness there. But like what you said is like you’re immediately doing an evaluation of your class afterwards. Just like I am. And you know, if if you walked up to me immediately after a class, I can tell you all the things that I would change about it immediately. I’m like, I lost four minutes over there. I forfeited to the whiteboard because they were messing around. I should have broken the rowers out sooner. Like all those things, like I know that stuff. And that’s what I don’t think enough people are. I think they clock in and then they clock out. And there’s no critical evaluation of what they just did each time. Step on the floor.

Paul Tremblay:
So how do you have that if you’re just the coach and Ophelia and you don’t own it, too, right?

Fern:
Yeah, I think. Well, yeah, but I think I think there’s just some intrinsic like. Either you want to do this or you don’t.

Paul Tremblay:
You know. Yeah.

Fern:
But that’s an that’s another discussion about incentivizing people to want to do it for a living. You know, like you stated earlier, it’s hard to it’s hard to really push hard on somebody does this part time. So.

Paul Tremblay:
Yeah. Cool.

Fern:
We’ll dude. This has been awesome.

Paul Tremblay:
Thanks for having me, man.

Fern:
Absolutely, dude. Anything else you want the folks to know about Paul Horsed Trombley or NCR Crossfit?

Paul Tremblay:
Maybe for another episode of me back on. I like this.

Fern:
I’ll have you back on all ends. Well, I’ll hit up Pete. I’ll get Pete on there. We’ll talk about how he’s now surpassed you as a competitive athlete.

Paul Tremblay:
And then and then and then. You Dick should be cool to have you guys both on. So,.

Fern:
Yeah,.

Paul Tremblay:
We’ll set it up. Roll off of it. Cool. Enjoy your weekend off, dude. I know. I got one off you.

Fern:
All right, guys, if you guys got questions for Paul or just about anything they got or about their affiliate programming, hit us up. We’ll pass you guys on. But you can just look it up. Just ends ya Crossfitters a Crossfitters ya Crossfitters the area and.

Paul Tremblay:
We sell the NPR program.

Fern:
Yeah, hit it up. Check it out. There’s some good stuff in there. I was looking at it before we hop on the podcast. So you questions guys. Hit us up and we will see you next time. Thanks, brother. It’d.

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