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137. Cool Downs

137. Cool Downs

In today’s episode, Fern and Ackerman discuss how to run an effective cooldown. It’s the most unutilised part of a class, meaning it’s either not planned for or is just an afterthought of “if there’s time”. Fren and Ackerman example that why it’s essential to your athletes, and it doesn’t have to be just sketching, it about brings people back down to normalcy. It’s also the time in which you have a clear opening as a coach to connect with people and build that relationship. The key take away for the cool down is it should be short, fun and beneficial to your athletes.

Timestamp 

(3:25) What should happen in Cool Down
(5:59) Effective ways to do it and why it’s important – Goal of it
(12:09) What you can do in that time
(18:11) The cool down is where the community is built
(20:17) Putting equipment away before people are finished
(26:22) It allows you to check-in and connects with people
(28:40) Can you still work out during the cool down?
(34:08) Don’t go nut’s with you cool down, don’t make another work out
(37:06) The upcoming release of the box tour
(40:07) Wrapping up the cool down
(41:37) The Best Hour Of Their Day Programming 

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Ackerman:
All right, welcome back to Best Hour of their day, Fern, something you and I discuss all the time, our timelines and lesson plans when it comes to coaching. What do you think is the least utilized aspect of an effective class?

Fren:
Probably the cool down. Yeah, I mean, I think most people don’t even know if it’s done like intention. I think probably most people do it out of necessity, meaning the timelines don’t allocate any sort of dedicated time for Cool Down

Ackerman:
Well, I think we need to discuss all the time how important it is to go into your class with a proper lesson plan, a proper timeline. And yeah, if you don’t have that, the first thing that’s probably going to go with those last five to seven minutes and a cool down can be one of the most effective parts of the class. I mean, when we talk about what goes as a new class, we’re talking about the whiteboard briefs. Go back and listen to our episode about that. Attach our most downloaded episode, the whiteboard brief and probably the one that’s gotten the most feedback on. Do you think that’s the most important part of the class?

Fren:
I mean, it is super important. I mean, the workout is where people get what they came for. So you got you. You’d be hard pressed to be like, you know, because you could do a great for a brief and no workout. And then I would argue that a horrible class. But the I think it does set the tone for everything else. When I give the programming lectures at level ones and level twos, I really try to emphasize to people in those courses that that three to four minutes on the front end can solve virtually every problem that you are going to encounter as a coach.

Fren:
Whether it be an athlete doesn’t want to listen. They don’t want a skill correctly. They’re resistant to coaching. I mean, all those things where people put their equipment like all that, like you can solve that in three minutes and you won’t ever have to worry about it.

Ackerman:
Well, and we dive really deep into the lifeblood Greece to go back and listen to it. Maybe our second or third episode from there, we have a general warm up, a specific warm up. Of course, like Fern just said, the workout or what? But then the neglected asked that the redheaded stepchild of a good lesson plan is the cool down. If you are running an ideal class and perfect dala, how long would you dedicate to that goal?

Fren:
I always try to a lot 10, which means I’m typically going to get seven.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I think that’s important. You know, you kind of lay out those 60 minutes. Inevitably something goes on. Too many people have to take a nervous pee. You know, the specific up goes a little further. Yeah. The equipment took a little longer to set up than we had anticipated. But even seven minutes isn’t nothing really. That’s what we’re gonna dive into today, running an effective cooldown in class because both Fern and I agree often neglected. You finish a workout and you just kind of piecing out, you know, giving your face. But I’m saying goodbye that really a lot more should be happening in that cool down. So first and foremost, Fern, explain to the listeners what should be happening at, you know, at the most basic level during the cooldown.

Fren:
Yeah. So there’s there’s really two aspects to this. The first one is just. Physiologically, what needs to happen? So they’ve just finished doing a high intensity workout, whether it’s a heavy lift or a mat con or potentially a pairing of those two. We have to bring the body back down to homeostasis. So let’s just go with a METC on, you know, like if their heart rate was at 160 for some extended period of time, like we have to give them the opportunity to bring the heart rate back down if it’s hot outside or their core temperature is really, really high, we need to bring the core temperature down. If it’s a if it’s a really, really heavy deadlift, we have to give the central nervous system a little bit of time to reset. And what I mean by that is if you ever. So this an interesting little test. So if you do something, pick anything you want that requires fine motor skill. So whether it’s like typing quickly or doing some sort of test with your fingers or something, that requires very, very high accuracy of hand-eye coordination. Test that right before you do a heavy lift and then go into like a heavy deadlift session. And then immediately upon finishing the deadlifts session or heavy back squat session, test that thing again and you will see a pretty significant degradation in function because of how taxing it is on the central nervous system. And that’s why and that’s why people will do. That’s why police officers, military, Ellia, will do stress test shooting. So they’ll do some a lot of physical activity and then they’ll go and they’ll run through some course of fire because we, like you can have some adaptation there where I can learn to to buffer that kind of loss of function and in minute way. But. The point is like we have to bring them back down because it’s not responsible from a professional standpoint to just crush people physically and the nervous system and then expect them to just and then just kick them out the door.

Ackerman:
Well, think about what you’re referring to. Basically, most people when they leave the workout are getting in a car.

Fren:
Yeah,.

Ackerman:
You know, so.

Fren:
They’re gonna text while they do it. So in A.

Ackerman:
Text while they do it ,.

Fren:
Your text is going to not going to say what you want it to and then B, you’re not going to be paying attention and you’re going to have like not the ability to drive that you would like.

Ackerman:
Yeah. Exactly. So for one, I think a solid cooldown does just that bring people back to homeostasis. Heart rate, CNS recovery, all that good stuff. But assuming we do that. So let’s let’s start right there. What are some effective ways you find to do that?

Fren:
So I am a big fan of just sending people on a walk. So I know we all like to to, you know, do the bacon sizzel when everybody finishes the workout, they just fall down on the floor and they lay there. I prefer to have people continue to move. Post-workout. So go for a walk. Get on a stationary bike or something like that and just move. I mean it like a very, very low rate of speed. I mean, like a casual Sunday walk just to catch their breath and start to get back to something that resembles like a reset. And and the other reason I like to do that is because it gives people the opportunity interact and that’s where you get to build a little bit of community. So the way the brain works is it’s kind of hyper stimulated post exercise.

Fren:
And then people are more vulnerable post exercise, meaning they’re more willing to have conversations, they’re more willing to open up about things, are more willing to be emotional. And this is where you can make some breakthroughs and create some relationships and connection points between members, but also between you and those athletes as the professional. So I don’t think you can overlook that. You’re going to find those people that are kind of like the thick candy shell people. You’re going to be able to break through on those people post-workout.

Ackerman:
I forget where I’ve read this. I think it was Matt Charn. He was talking about cool downs, and a good rule of thumb is. And this might not be doable in class, but maybe for your own knowledge or potentially trying to incorporate as think about the workout in a 20 minute window and whatever is remaining for those 20 minutes, you should be cooling down. And that means really the more intense and the shorter the workout, the longer you actually need to be recovering. So you have a two minute fran. 18 minutes should be spending recovering versus a 15 minute amrap, maybe only five minutes. Personally, when I finish a workout, I do my best to go over. CHEERING people on. But then as soon as everyone’s done, I’ll hop on, you know, depending on where I am being an assault bike and concept 2 bike, etc. and just pedal easily or like friends and go for a walk. But that can be a good rule of thumb. Just, you know, you might not be able to incorporate that in a classroom setting. But hey, just remember the shorter and the harder it is on your members. Actually, the longer they need to recover.

Fren:
Yeah, and recovery doesn’t mean stretch. Right. So I think a lot of people misinterpret recovery for like a bit. You have to do nothing. I mean, this is it doesn’t mean that this is a good time to refine, you know, motor patterns or work on some maybe high skill or, you know, physical imbalances, you know, from limb to limb. You like it doesn’t have to be this crazy, you know, like just lay there and breathe for fifteen minutes. You know, you can do a lot of things as long as it’s low intensity and you’re bringing people back to some degree of homeostasis. And then I think you can be effective. But, you know, I think it serves I think it serves two purposes. One, again, is that a physiological response to a high intensity? But the other one is that kind of community or the emotional response that we can take advantage of. Post-workout it it’s super, super important where you get to really highlight peers. This is where you get to, you know, give somebody a huge shot out because it’s their first Crossfit, workout with your with your gym and your members. But if you run the class, 2:58, you know, you have two minutes to clean up. I don’t get to highlight J because it’s his first day and he showed up and he was super nervous about it.

Fren:
And I don’t give the members the opportunity to interact with him and and and tell their story that when they started, they felt just like him. You know, I think, you know, that cool down is is central. And if you look at your class time, I think the the front and the back end, those bookends are arguably the most pivotal points of your class. You know, the whiteboard brief and the cool down, you know, if you think about what those actually are. A lot of it is relationship building. You know, it’s community based for those two things. So I think it’s just and again, like I always try shoot for 10 with the goal of getting seven because I leave myself the ability to buy back three of those if I need them somewhere else in the timeline. But I regularly have 15 minutes, at which point like I’ll do a couple of different things. You know, we had a guy last week who turned fifty seven and we had like fifteen or sixteen people in the class and we just made a huge circle and we just did like birthday burpees, like a waterfall just around like everybody had a burpee until we got the fifty seven for his birthday. So stuff like that you can’t, you can’t downplay that stuff.

Ackerman:
Yeah. We’ll talk more about some options in there because again, like you said, that cool down doesn’t necessarily need to just be only stretching, you know. We’ll talk about some other things. Right. Even what you just alluded to. Fifty seven burpees know everyone is doing maybe three or four times.

Ackerman:
But really, they’re they’re cooling down during that. Their heart rate’s coming down. CHEERING each other on. But, you know, any other group class setting, when you think of like the young guys are you think of the martial arts out there. They have a cool down, you know, in yoga. They call it Shabaks in a way, you just kind of chilling out on your back. And I remember as a yoga instructor, seeing the people that were super high stress and busy, they would actually leave thinking they were done. And I would always say to them, like, this is actually the most important part. Like, if you can’t land your mat for five minutes with your eyes closed and just chill the f out, you need this more than I do. And then in the martial arts world, it often looks like, hey, you know, we’re gonna line now, we’re going to do promotions, you know, stripes, talk about what we went over, shake everybody’s hand on the way out. So, you know, these other worlds do it and it’s just super neglected in this topic actually came from our mentor group, you know, and I run the best hour of their day, mentor our group, and we get lots of questions in there. And then one of our members, Daniel, was just asking me, hey, I really struggle with this. What are some other things we can do? So, you know, we’ve kind of touched upon the goal of it. But now let’s talk about what else can be happening in those seven minutes.

Fren:
So there’s two things that come to mind immediately. The first one is some mobility work. And the reason it can be really beneficial to do some of. Work is because people are are. More prepared to do. Meaning like physically, they’re more prepared to do mobility work, so their core temperature up their muscles are probably pretty loose at this point. And and to some degree they’re going to be a little bit more relaxed because they’re they’ve just exhausted themselves. So this is where you can kind of implement some of these kind of banded distraction techniques that you’ll find and like on it or like mobility kind of protocols you can find on stuff like go quad where they’re going to do some kind of specific mobility run throughs depending on what it is that you trained for that day. So I think that’s the obvious one. The other one is if you have followed Chris Hinshaw stuff, a lot of what he teaches in his seminar for robot capacity, which you haven’t taken highly recommended take, it is kind of like teaching your body to buffer lactic acid. So you can do cool downs that will help basically prepare the body for future onslaughts of high production of lactic acid to buffer it a little bit more efficiently. And therefore, I’m going to be able to move faster through a workout without so much deterioration in my effort because my body can buffer lactic acid and get rid of it more efficiently. And these are all things that you can train that are not intended to be high intensity, that are not intended to be super structured in that in that sense, we’re like in the cool should be fairly kind of laissez faire, if you will. Like, it should be like pretty chill.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And, you know, I think oftentimes people just think, like you said, hey, cool down, there’s only this opportunity to to stretch. But yeah, we can be really diligent and really think about what we’re doing and have a plan there. This shouldn’t be. Oh, we got 70 minutes. Grab your toes. It should be. Hey, we just went overhead, overhead. Let’s veganism mobility over head and your shoulders or we just slide. Let’s let’s dig into those hips, because both you and I know if you tell people, hey, class ended, go stretch a little bit. Mobilize what percentage of people are doing that?

Fren:
Nobody. Nobody is gonna do it because number one, they don’t know what to do. Like that’s the biggest thing you’ll like, go stretch. And we think that’s ridiculous that people don’t know what to do. But it’s not like they don’t care about mobility. Meaning they don’t care enough to go study and learn things about it. And they’re not going to do it because it’s boring. So generally, it’s better to try to do it in a group because people are more inclined to do it in a group than they are on their own, with the exception of, you know, those weird mobility weirdos. But who just want to mobilize all day long. Great.

Ackerman:
Great point. Don’t we forget as coaches all the time. This is our livelihood. This is our job. You know, we care a lot about this. The average Crossfit, member has joined because they don’t know. They don’t want to think. They just simply want to, you know, get in, get out in an hour, our look better naked, all that good stuff. And then sometimes we get frustrated that they don’t know it’s our job. That’s what we’re there for. And too many coaches, you know, the world ends and they think their job is over. No. That’s what we’re saying. Cool down is continue to educate. Continue to coach. You shouldn’t be done coaching normally at the underclassmen, probably five or 10. You know, we all know coaching is not a one hour job. It’s 15 minutes per forehands, 15 minutes after. And really, that’s what we need to be grilling.

Fren:
Something else you could do. And again, promoting some kind of forced interaction there is if you’ve ever heard of kind of PNW stretching, which stands for appropriate supped of neuromuscular facilitation, it that’s general. You generally need a partner for that. And what it is I’m going to I’m going to take my muscle to end range. I’m going to stress it in range, relax. And then my partner is going to basically bring me to a new end range. And with a partner done correctly, you can get extreme increases of range of motion in relatively short order. I mean, under five minutes, like, you can get upwards of 20 to 30 degrees increase in range of motion depending on what you’re looking at. And a lot of athletes and that’s a good tool to use a because you need everybody’s gonna need a partner for that. But then, B, it’s it’s not like. It’s gonna be work. Right. Like if you’ve ever done, like, really, really pro appropriately and properly done bnf stretching like it’s. I’m not relaxing, but I am getting a ton of benefit out of it and is like stretching, if you will.

Fren:
But it’s a different type of stretching. Yeah. Another thing I learned from I’ve got a. An osteopath. He’s a he’s a. Neuro osteopath anyway. But his big thing that he’s. And I’ve been seeing him for ten years and he’s basically like a chiropractor on steroids. He’s like there’s never anything that he hasn’t fixed up fixed on me. But he taught me years ago that if you’re gonna do a lot of pulling from, all right, let’s say you did a high volume of pull ups. He would. So this guy worked for Cirque de Soleil for like eight years. So like you’ve seen the most extreme version of human performance and he’s worked on them. And he would say, hey, listen, if you’re let’s say you’re going to do high volume of Pull-Ups, he’s like kick upside down and hold a handstand. As long as you can up against the wall just to basically do some complementary function to it so that your body doesn’t start to contract into that polling position so that you can basically take that position and go the opposite direction in a static hold. So nothing like not talking about pressing. He’s talking about static hold in the opposite direction. And I’ve always found that to be really, really beneficial in the end reduces my restriction overhead the following day and as well as soreness afterwards, too.

Ackerman:
Well, one thing that you mentioned, especially if you dive into something like stretching it, you’re building that community because you need two people and you can coach the people through it like, hey, resist for five seconds, push for five seconds, etc. But all those things are ultimately building the community and the cool down. Like we said in the beginning of this episode, is really effective at building community. You know, think about the thing about the lack of an hour. The whiteboard brief. Most people come in, they’re stressed out. They came from work and their family and worried about the work out is paying attention. The warm up, they’re moving the work out. Obviously, there’s no talking or minimal talking. And then the cool down as well as like you said, people are vulnerable. Not only are they vulnerable. Dopamine, endorphins, all that good stuff. They feel great. This is your opportunity. There’s a reason there’s so much. Consensual sex and Crossfit, civilians.

Fren:
Ok. Oh, natural. I said potential. I wasn’t. I wasn’t. I didn’t think that’s where you’re gonna go.

Ackerman:
But it’s because we all have those endorphins. We feel good. You know, we’re we’re happy. These are the people we enjoy being around. Build that community. I mean, I’m not saying promote everybody, you know, having a big orgy at Crossfit Rife. At the end of the day. But I’m just suggesting, hey, this is your opportunity to build community. And if sex happens during those seven minutes, let’s be real.

Fren:
Consensual. Only.

Ackerman:
30 seconds and you still have six and a half minutes left. Really to be real.

Fren:
So, you know, building that community to like what you said earlier, like giving those shout outs. You know, I think we do it at the level ones, and level twos every weekend. Like what you get, you know, anyone that’s taken a level, one of the dirty south can remember chutzpah as well, kind of pointing, you know, who is under nine minutes, who is under eight minutes? Do those, you know, don’t only emphasize the are X people, but you know, who got their first pull up or, you know, really PR this and did well. We’ll get the intended stimulus. Maybe that’s a shout out.

Fren:
Yeah. And this this kind of goes in tandem with the cool down. If we’ve talked about this. But you in order to have everybody clean up and do the cool down together, you should absolutely not allow people to put their equipment away into every single athlete who’s done working out.

Ackerman:
That’s a really good point that we should be discussing now. Your apps, if you coach, are you on the box? That’s probably, I would say my biggest , even Crossfit, as a coach. Yeah. You know, and not just as a coach, but even the times I’m in the workout and people are getting done for me and I see them, you know, dumping their barbell again, either in my way because I need to move from the barbell to the pull a bar to the regrets, whatever. And B, it’s just it’s it’s disrespectful. But again, that’s up to us to teach. That should be something as a coach, you say regularly and consistently at the white boy. Hey, as soon as you’re done, approach like this. Hey, what do we do when we finish? People are going to say cleaning up, doing this. No cheering on the person next to you.

Fren:
Yeah. And if it happens. So if that happens, just kind of politely walk. And you don’t have to make this an ordeal because you’re not trying to put somebody on the spot. And a lot of times they just don’t know. And very few instances. I kind of approach somebody and tell them to just leave the equipment there. Did they not immediately kind of apologize? And they say, oh, I didn’t know. They don’t know. So just tell them very plainly, hey, listen. Hey, just leave it there. We’re going to wait till Jay finishes the work out because he’s always last. He’s not really that fit. And and we’ll clean up together when we’re done. And and every every single person I’ve ever told that is. Oh, yeah. Sorry. Totally. Yeah. Oh, wait. It’s not a big deal. And because now you do have those those outliers who are doing it because they want everybody to know that they worked on first.

Ackerman:
But that’s yeah. That’s going.

Fren:
To be outliers. Right. And that’s a discussion about, hey, if if the first thing you do when you finish work and start putting your equipment away, then you try to do a workout correctly. But again, those are just real simple off-line conversations. But just like you said, again, going back to solving all those problems for the workout starts what you just mentioned, which is just tell everybody before the class even starts. Problem solved. You don’t worry about it.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And I get frustrated with coaches that get mad or yellow. Those people it’s like you’ve mentioned a they truly just don’t know if anything is going on in your class. It’s your fault as the course. Most people have no clue what’s going on. And B, are you really going to get mad at somebody who is trying to clean up after themselves? Right. Like that.

Fren:
Better than just would. It’s better than just leaving it.

Ackerman:
Right. But it’s like, hey, you know, if if it’s the same person and every time they do it, maybe then it’s a conversation. But if it’s their first week. But that’s something I’d talk about. Almost every time I go, hey, guys, as soon as you’re done, grab the person next to you.

Ackerman:
And even the next level, when when the better athletes start to finish, you know, assuming it was then more people that maybe scale and then they finish a little faster. I’ll give them directives like, hey, I want you to go cheer that person on. And and then they feel like they have a role. That person that’s so moving feels exciting because they have someone cheering them on and they get a little more motivated.

Fren:
I had a guy quite my gym once because of that.

Ackerman:
Which one? Which which aspect?

Fren:
Because you told me so much so. So like three times in one month, I had to approach him about leaving, about picking up his equipment. Like when everybody else is working out and his excuses always like why I gotta go, I gotta get out of here and then leave it. We’ll clean it up. Don’t sweat it. And. And so finally, we we didn’t really have it out. But I really like stood my my my ground, like, pretty pretty firmly and. And even come back. And it was totally okay with that because I guy was a turd and it bothered everybody that it would do it.

Ackerman:
Yeah, and I think that was the one out of 100 people that wanted to let everybody know I’m fast then you .

Fren:
Yeah, the I always have a question about the cool down. So and this is more along. This has nothing to do with, you know, fitness or anything like that. This is it. This is more along the lines of. Of running an affiliate. If you’re not having a cool down in your class, then I really think you should ask yourself. Then when am I engaging people on a personal level? You know, going to that empathy episode or Pat Barber bringing up Ford, which is what with fitness, occupation, recreational family, Ocky occupation, recreation and dreams are correct. Four?

Ackerman:
Yeah, I believe so.

Fren:
So if you’re not talking to people in the cool downs or you’re not have a cool down, then when are you when are you engaging these people? Like at a deeper level other than fitness, like you’re probably not is the question.

Ackerman:
Right you know, it’s it’s not happening during the workout, that’s for sure. I mean, you can you know, obviously, like we said, ineffective class starts ten or fifteen minutes beforehand. Right. So A, if you’re coaching and you’re the coach that shows up right at five for the five o’clock class, you’re not a good coach. That’s a shitty attitude. No lights happens. Things get in the way.

Fren:
That bugs me. That bugs me to no end.

Ackerman:
Oh yeah. And I personally wouldn’t let you coach if that were the case. If you’re like, hey, get out, get out of work just in time to make it cool. Well, you can coach the next class,.

Fren:
Correct?

Ackerman:
You don’t get to coach this time because you need to be there fifteen minutes. You need to be welcoming people. You need to be, you know, potentially talking about injuries and helping people scale. It’s not only in an hour. And that would be when you do it. It’s not happening in the workout. Maybe a little bit in the general warm. To me, the general warm up is my. It’s probably the most fun. I get to blast them like fun music, like to have those conversations in, you know, laugh a little bit. But but really, as the general warmup moves forward and we get close to that specific warm up, you have to go from cheerleader to coach in in that eight to twelve minutes.

Fren:
Yeah. The other thing that you can do in the cool down, which is something incredibly beneficial, is that we all know we’ve all had that athlete who’s having a bad day and just having a shitty workout and I don’t want to say has a bad attitude. They’re just dealing with their stuff. If I don’t have that that seven to 10 minutes on the back end, that allows me to kind of float around, set up some sort of mobility kind of sequence or do some sort of little weird L sit you know, fun. And then you have two to three minutes to check in on that person and just see what the hell’s going on, that’s going to be a problem. And the the just the mere IG knowledge. AMENT On your behalf that you see that they’re having a bad day to that athlete goes a really, really long way. And if I have two minutes to clean up and then roll into the next class, I don’t get that opportunity. And that’s why I’m always mad when I don’t get what I want on the back end because I’ve missed opportunity to connect with people and that’s really what it is.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And I think if you’re looking for certain intangibles when it comes to the cool down seven minutes.

Fren:
Yeah, there’s a lot of time. You know,.

Ackerman:
Ya know, I have a little deeper and. What else can be happening during that? But in addition to seven minutes, within those seven minutes, you should be touching base with every single athlete, be at a high five. Like you said, you know, a good game type of thing in a acceptable way of using their names. But that’s what should be happening. You know, so you’re like, OK, what what can I be doing to improve my hold down for one, leaving yourself those seven minutes? And then secondly, making sure you touch base with every single person that was in your class. Now, let’s talk about some other things, because really, we’ve said he had an effective cooldown, brings people down. You know, you’re building your community. Maybe you’re talking about, you know, for example, it’s coming up on the holidays. This is probably the time of the year where you want to remind people, hey, we’re closed on Christmas or Christmas Eve as the twelve days work out, et cetera. Going through that, maybe a little reminder of what to be doing for their nutrition. All that stuff. But do you feel like there’s room within the cool down to potentially do more? Working out.

Fren:
Yeah, and I kind of alluded to this earlier, so something I was actually working with Kristen Bowen, who’s gonna be on the podcast. So she’s a flow master here and she’s located here in Virginia Beach. And we were just toying around with the thought of of something like what is the min? So this goes back to Coach Glassman, this thing about like, hey, the three minute l sit and we were just having a discussion. And my question was kind of something along the lines of what’s the minimum effective dose for daily input on a skill set like that to have to be able to progress month over month?

Fren:
And we basically. Put a challenge to ourselves, which is let’s just try 40 seconds of el sit every day for one month, so we’re going to test on day one, we’re gonna test out on day 30 and then 40 seconds and that 40 seconds can look like a lot of different things depending on where you’re at with the L set, right. So it could be with. It could be a tucked position. Both legs tucked in. It could be one leg extended, one leg tucked in. It could be kind of more, you know, like whatever that scale looks like for you. But accumulate 40 seconds, which most people are gonna do. And four ten second intervals,.

Ackerman:
Where do you come up with 40 seconds?

Fren:
I was I was just I was just spitballing. I’m like, what’s the what’s the minimum effective dose? Like, could you get a significant increase if you did 40 seconds? Because I can always adjust the position to make it harder. Right. So I don’t necessarily have to look to make the exit harder, I can just I can just improve the position which will inherently make it more difficult. Right. So if you can’t keep your feet together and point your toes like that would be the first thing. Like if you can’t extend your legs like that would be the first thing if you can’t even hold the tuck. Well, then maybe we just have to. Or you can’t do it from the floor or maybe do it from parallel. So all of this we really haven’t done anything to progressed past the L sit. But 40 seconds is a long time, particularly post-workout. Like if you’re going to accumulate 40 seconds and you know you want to do it however you want.

Ackerman:
I’m just thinking out loud because we’ve got a lot of listeners we get throughout the challenge to them, hey, maybe starting today, like Fren said. 40 seconds a day, let’s see what you can do, would you say the goal is within 30 days to have a 40 second L sit?

Fren:
I think that would be the goal of. Based on what you and you have to retest it, exactly how you tested it to begin with. Right. So if you test it, it will talk to needs at the beginning. That’s how you would retest it even if you progressed past that in the 30 days. And I was and I was I was just curious as to, you know, it’s not about the else. it. Right. Like the whole thing is not about the nail. It’s not about the exit. I would I want to see what they carry over to other movements or if they can move from not having an L sit at all to forty second. But you know me talk to exit. Is there a deadlift position going to improve? Are they gonna be able to maintain kip swings and Pull-Ups better? Are they going to not die out in the muscle up as fast, you know, because they’re midline breaks down like that’s normal. Yeah. I mean, what cares about that?

Ackerman:
That’s the black blops theory that coach classman talked about way back when. And it kind of gets I don’t really hear many people talking about that black box theory anymore. And the theory is we have a whole bunch of inputs. And like Fern saying in this case, it’s a 40 second L sit practice. It goes in this kind of box, our body. And then the output is not just an improved delson, but who knows what it naturally.

Fren:
20 bls PR in your deadlift.

Ackerman:
Yeah. I mean, if you’re if you’re if you’ve gone from a five to 10 second even tough tells it to forty second, you’re going overhead better and your muscle ups are improving all that good stuff.

Fren:
And the other reason I chose 40 seconds is because we were thinking about putting it in a cool down and I don’t want it to take a ridiculous amount of time. You know, like if you’re doing 10 seconds on 30 seconds off, that’s 40 seconds. You know, you talk about less than four minutes of just work on the set and then I’m out.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I’m in. I’m going to start doing this, too, because I know the it is, I believe, one of the best movements that’s neglected. Coach lassman said way back when you if you have a three minute set, you have nothing to worry about when it comes to abdominal training. Yeah, I think that’s a little ridiculous. I would I would maybe modify that. Save and save you have a one minute LC. You’re pretty damn fit. But that’s kind of my goal.

Fren:
I think I think I like I think a pretty good Crossfit, or could probably hold a really nice l sit for thirty to forty five seconds before they fall apart. And I would say if you have if you have 90 seconds, you’re a stud.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And if you’re listening and you’re telling us you have a 90 second I’ll it.

Fren:
I want to see it.

Ackerman:
Yeah exactly. Yeah. I doubt you do. And hey, something else you mentioned. And for the listeners out there, especially the men go Google, that video that mentioned it’s not about the nail.

Fren:
And don’t don’t show it to your significant other thinking. They’re gonna think it’s funny. They won’t.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I showed that some.

Fren:
Just for dudes.

Ackerman:
I think it was Chris Russell. He showed it to me. And then I was going to show this. Roz she was is like, I don’t get it. Yeah, exactly. So. All right.

Fren:
o now before before that. So don’t get nuts with it with the stuff you stick in the cool down. So that’s that’s like the the the fatal flaw of the cool down is we turn it into like a second workout, like a meat like again, 40 seconds because I was trying to think of minimum effective dose. Like what is the minimum input I need to put in here in order to get a change in the output. So don’t get nuts with your cool down stuff that should be short fun. Beneficial.

Ackerman:
Well, yeah. And I agree. I think you know the average number. Doesn’t spend more time than the one hour on class, and then it’s like, well, how did they get Muslims? How are they ever gonna get a handstand block? How are they going to learn how to snatch properly? Those are some things that could be happening. Like you said, wake the workout ends. Grab some BBC guys.

Ackerman:
We’re gonna review the first fall. We’re going to review the third full. We’re gonna review it. Let’s just work on some overhead squat positions there cooling down. They’re moving slower. And that’s how they’re going to develop those skills. And, you know, that can be your opportunity for your better athletes actually be inverted and handstand, walking your middle of the road, you know, maybe doing some wheel barrels. You’re you’re more skilled athletes doing better Krall’s. But that’s how they get better. They’re still moving. They’re still developing. It doesn’t, like you said, have to turn into. Another workout out because that is essentially not cool down then.

Fren:
Yeah. And if you want to make it fun, just take the same idea. Again, like fun is always makes it better. Like suffering in a group is always better. Just take the same thing that I talked about earlier with the burpees and do it with the L said if you want to. Hey, everybody, get in a circle. As soon as that person is done with their ticket, 10 seconds, you’re going to pop up and we’re just gonna go around the circle. When your time comes back, you’re gonna pop up for another ten seconds. And again, now it’s fun. Now we’re all doing it wrong, engaged every really doing the best that they can. And and it’s just, again, fun and getting some some interaction with people. Is the idea there.

Ackerman:
Yeah, some big picture. We’re talking cool down. You can’t neglect the main focus of the cooldown, which is to bring everybody back to normalcy. But beyond that, really, like we’ve said about here’s like you’ve said about scaling, like you said about workouts, you’re only limited by your own creativity.

Fren:
Correct. Correct. And that was one of the big things that you and I picked up a ton of stuff when we did the box tour on just on warm ups in general, like I was just stealing like little ones, twosies that are that are very subtle changes. The things that I already do that I that I stole. And I came back and I use them and I can see the other coaches in there, they’re like their eyes lit up, like, I’m going to steal that. Right. Like constantly, you know, the cool down in the warm up or the early or the in my opinion, the two toughest things to not become monotonous with. It becomes Groundhog’s Day. Oh, my God. Who’s gonna do this? I want to do this. So that’s where I believe like, if you if you can exercise, like, that’s where I would put my creativity is in is in the warm ups and the cool downs.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And you should bring your own little flair to your own little. You know what? You enjoy it. It has to be fun for you. So it’s fun for the members. And speaking of the box store, couple weeks, we got our first episode coming out.

Fren:
I’m so stoked.

Ackerman:
They weren’t very excited about this.

Fren:
I am excited like it was. It was a lot of fun. My body hurt tremendously afterwards, but it was a lot of fun. And and I think I can’t wait for the next one, which we need to get on the books. But I think I learned a lot. I think the people that are gonna watch are gonna learn a lot. And I think it’s going to be. A very, very small slice of what’s to come with regard to that project in the future.

Ackerman:
Yeah, and it’s really cool. You know, if you’ve been checking our Instagram best hour of their day right now, we’re kind of putting up some of the fun snippets like fun goofing around me, goofing around. But really, this show is gonna be a whole lot deeper. There was a recent post that I put up about Fren talking about Crossfit, teeb T.G. and you remember Juice. Not only did the snatch and you know what Fren said in that post about how most of the boxes did multiple pieces. That’s the kind of stuff you’re going to see in these episodes. US talking the coach, just talking about what the workouts were and so much more. Of course, there’s gonna be some friendly banter, but if you’re a box owner or if you’re a coach or you’re just a member and you want to see what some other affiliates look like, because I think we forget, you know, as part of the Level 1 staff and having been around Crossfit, for almost fifteen years now, you and I combined have probably been to 500 boxes and the average person has been to one, maybe two.

Fren:
Yeah,.

Ackerman:
And you’re gonna pick up things from the warm up to the cool down to maybe, you know. Oh, I like that. Yes. All those little things that we point out there. I remember at Crossfit, invoked, for example, they had that little keychain rack and I was like, that’s a great idea. I mean, every box at one point has had someone lose their keys because they went live in someone else’s bag.

Fren:
I had somebody this week and they they like lost their wedding ring, which is like the one hundredth time that’s happened.

Ackerman:
Yeah. Well, first of all, get yourself a groove life ring because it’s replaceable for you. You the code best, our great 18 percent. But yeah. Secondly, we had a little rack for wedding rings and key chains. It’d be a lot less likely. Speaking of how saw we were. I remember I had to work that weekend after and both days I just went out for a walk during lunch.

Fren:
Yeah, I’d like. And that’s cool. And if you’re so into the other thing is if you get stuck in your end, you’re thinking yourself. I don’t know where to start with these cooldowns and stretching. If you’re an affiliate owner, go to gowod and you get it for free access to that. They’ve got tons of stuff in there. You can just put your programming in there and then you can look at pull some stuff down there for like mobility and stretching.

Ackerman:
Yeah, big picture, right?

Fren:
Do we have code for that?

Ackerman:
We don’t have a code for Go WOD? But they’re friends of the pod gas and every hopefully gets it for free. Like you said. But let’s let’s put a bow on this cool down thing. I think, you know, if we were gonna kind of rapid fire some things. One, you’ve got to write a timeline. You’re not going to have a pull down if you don’t plan for your hour.

Fren:
Yup. And I would I would argue that like plan for more than you think you’re gonna get. But that’s why I said I plan for 10 with a goal of getting seven. If I get 10, I consider that really, really great. But I’m generally going to get seven.

Ackerman:
Yeah. So what that looks like is let’s assume your class runs on the hour, you know, five o’clock. I need my class a workout to finish at five fifty. So what you have to do is a little math backwards. And you know, if it’s an AM breath, easy day, I’d just start by five thirty because it’s a 20 minute wrap. If it’s three rounds for time, you need to have an idea of how long you want everybody to take. And that doesn’t mean put a time time cap on it.

Ackerman:
That means three different properly and scale better know from there. Have a plan during that. Does it look like today is just stretching mobility P and F like and spoke about it?

Ackerman:
Are you going to go in to go wod? And you know, one cool thing about go what is you can plug into movements you did. It will throw out a spit ball, some great mobility just for you. Or is it the day you’re going to work on some skills? Point is, you got it, you’ve got to challenge yourself to make that work.

Fren:
And this brings up. I wasn’t gonna bring this up earlier, but we are launching affiliate programming in January. And these are the things that we’re gonna help people with. So our goal with affiliate programming is a programming that is coach centric. So if you want your coaches to improve their skill as coaches, this is what that programming is for.

Fren:
Like everything we’ve designed and there is is built in mind for developing the coaches. And in doing so, your athletes will also get fitter. So we’re gonna cover a lot of these things. And for those of you that are just stuck like Chuck and you don’t know what to do there, then then there will be a resource there available to you. Yeah. Got questions about that. Hit us up.

Ackerman:
Let’s be real. Members, don’t stay your box because of the programming. You know, we’re gonna put out great programming. We’re gonna put out workouts and get you fitter. But members say your box because the coaching and if you’re a box owner or if you’re a coach right now, how are you developing? You know, maybe your reading books, maybe you’re gone and studying for your level three. But our programming best hour of their day programming is going to develop you every single day. You know, there’s some programming out there that puts some other things into it versus just the workouts. But they don’t tell you what we’re going to tell you. Things to focus on, where to look, to correct movements. Everything you hear in this podcast is gonna be in our programming and it’s going to make your box better.

Fren:
Weekly coaching challenges, stuff like that. We’re really going to push the margins of people’s experience with regard to like what they’re doing and that 60 Minutes. And in doing so, your athletes will reap the rewards.

Ackerman:
Awesome. So that’s what we’re gonna do it. That’s our other day programming coming out in twenty twenty. And we’ve got some more great episodes coming at you the next few weeks, some great interviews, some great topics. Of course, if you have topics you want to hear us discuss, it is the best hour of your day. G-mail or DMI us at our best hour of their day. Instagram and subscribe to our YouTube channel. You’re not going to want to miss it. Dropping in is gonna be. I’m putting it out there now. It’s going to be the biggest showing year.

Fren:
In the world. I want to I wanted to say something really ridiculous.

Ackerman:
Yeah. I’m not talking about Crossfit,. I’m not talking about YouTube. I’m saying it’s gonna be the biggest show in the world. Forget Game of Thrones. Forget the Mandar Laurean dropping in my best hour of their days and then take over.

Fren:
That’s better. That’s ridiculous. I like it.

Ackerman:
All right. Fren. Another great episode. Hope that helps you guys. Question set us up. We’ll be back. Thanks again for listening.

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