139. RX Month

139. RX Month

On today’s episode Fern discuss what happens once a year at Crossfit Rife, it’s called RX Month. It’s where for a whole month they change what it means to do the workout “prescribed”. It’s called RX month because of it about giving everybody the opportunity to RX the stimulus. They also dive into the how-to brief and run RX month. The problems that can come about and the push that came from some members at first. The vita focus with this month is to help push the stimulus to the front of everyone’s mind and deemphasizes the weight on the barbell. 

Timestamps: 

(5:58) How to get your athletes to push beyond putting the bar down?
(8:36) How it hit RX during RX month?
(10:54) How to Brief
(14:35) Wod build-up
(23:10) Sucess of RX month 
(24:40) Scaling points

Whiteboard Brief

We value your feedback. After listening, please hit me up with any questions, comments, or thoughts on how we can make this show even better, and if you enjoyed it, please share it!

Instagram; @besthouroftheirday

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman

Rate/subscribe in Apple Podcasts!

Check out our website – besthouroftheirday.com – to learn more about our private coaches development group.

Rx Month.mp4 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Rx Month.mp4 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2019.

Jason Ackerman:
Best hour of their day is back for tonight. Talking about something very unique and very. I would say it’s rarely done. I’d be the best way to talk about em and ask you a lot about it. Because you do this at your box and it’s when we kind of say what it is. It’s gonna be scary, challenging and maybe come off as a little dumb. But let’s let’s call it what it is. What do you refer to it as? An Crossfit Rife.

Fern:
Well, to be super clear, we don’t do this all the time. We we do it once a year and it’s more of a it’s more of an experiment than anything and Todd. I talked about it a little bit on the podcast with Todd when we talked about what is RX. So if you haven’t listened that episode, go back and listen to that episode with Todd and I. But we change what it means to do a workout as prescribed.

Jason Ackerman:
So that’s an interesting point. And I think if you if you go back to 2007, there’s been so many experimentations and there was a period of time, at least for me at Albany Crossfit,, where we ran, I believe it was coming out of Toronto, it was this programming. But basically the workouts were programmed around the percentage of your one rep Max. So for example, friend, twenty one fifty nine thrusters and Pull-Ups, you would use 50 percent of your best thruster. And the goal was, hey, if everyone’s using 50 percent of their best, we’re getting a very similar stimulus. And if you look back to the 2001 2002 era of Crossfit,, I think really that’s how Coach Glassman defined many of your rx weights back in the day.

Fern:
I dig it. And we’ve played around with it. The problem is the practical execution of that in the affiliate every day. Right. So I don’t I don’t actually disagree with using percentage of absolute strength figures. I think it’s great. The problem is, I mean, if we were really to canvas the athletes and every affiliate and figure out what percentages of them had and had an accurate and relevant one rm, it would be relatively low like we we might do a one RM twice a year at Crossfit, rife because I just don’t find a ton of value of hitting those like those really like those really, really high percentages like I prefer to stick and everything between fives tattoos. You know what I mean.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. And I think that’s a good idea. And I think, you know what? Our friends, you know, you get the newer people that probably don’t actually hit that one arm because their form is solid enough and they’re not, you know, confident under a barbell, you get the more experienced people who could just be tired, fatigued, and they’re not going to have and say, yeah, I agree with that. But what I was thinking in 2001, 2002. I think even if you go back to February 10th, 2001, fast and heavy, the workout called for, you know, choose a heavy dumbbell. And a lot of the workouts back in the day were, you know, choose, choose the heavy this or choose the heavy, that really there was some data being absorbed and it was, hey, we’ll leave find the average person using ninety five pounds for thrusters or one thirty five for clean jerk. So this brings us to the topic. You refer to it as they no RX months.

Fern:
No, it’s actually RX month. Right. So it’s not know or X month. We just call it RX month and we call it that because we give everybody the opportunity to. And this is not about getting trophies. Right. So I don’t want it to be confusing that. But we do give everybody the opportunity to go RX because as we’ve talked about in the past, the goal of any given workout is to hit the intended stimulus, like whether it’s rounds or reps or whether it’s time or whether it’s, you know, heavy.

Fern:
That’s the goal. Not necessarily a specific like, quite frankly, arbitrary weight on a barbell. You know. So that’s the goal, right? So we give everybody opportunity to to check that box and it’s kind of based on how well they know themselves with a little bit of our guidance. But it’s it’s been really fun. We got to luck. The first year we did it, we got a lot of pushback. It’s is different. You know, we like something different the second year we did it and every year we’ve done it since then. I think this is our third year doing it. We got a lot of good feedback on it. People really dig it. It’s fun. You know, it it requires a little bit of critical thinking on the athlete’s part.

Jason Ackerman:
Which type of that gives you the most push back?.

Fern:
The same type of athlete that that there is, there is just that athlete. Everybody knows who it is, is the one that always gives you issues, who always pushes back about, you know. You know, wanting to do have your weight or do more reps or do a more complex movement, you know, do muscle ups when they don’t have muscle ups. You know, like those folks. So everybody, you you already know who it is in your gym. Well, I will tell you that.

Jason Ackerman:
Gotcha. Now, when did you have a period of time and Crossfit,. Right. Where you have certain members that wanted to go above and beyond RX? I’m thinking like that 2009, 2010 era of Crossfit,.

Fern:
Maybe, but we we’ve it for us.

Jason Ackerman:
I mean, like a case we’d like maybe ones or twosies over the years and I can’t remember who they would be had those people that, you know, I’m going to do frand with a weight vest on because it’s harder that way, but largely no because we’ve we’ve we’ve largely always discouraged that behavior.

Jason Ackerman:
There is a period of time in Albany, Crossfit,, where everybody just wants to go heavier and, you know, I think we’ve kind of talked about it in past episodes. Typically, when someone wants to go heavier, it’s a way of making it easier.

Fern:
Yeah, I mean, and Pat Sherwood said this to me years ago. And if you watch people train long enough, there’s a very distinct difference between somebody who puts the bar down because they want to versus somebody who puts the bar down because they physically have to. No one is a psychological breakdown, the other one is a physical breakdown. And, you know, obviously intensity is relative to both physical and psychological tolerances, but. Really, from a training standpoint, I would much prefer to butt up against your psychological tolerances than your physical tolerance because we know what’s going to happen if we are constantly jumping over that threshold of physical tolerance, which is there’s going to be breakdown to some varying degree of technique. And depending on what we’re doing, you know, that’s less than desirable.

Jason Ackerman:
But with that being said, we need to get people to understand and have the ability to push beyond just their desire to put the bar down. And, you know, we all understand what Fern is saying. You know, I kind of look at it as the people that we’re doing, friend, and they immediately say, hey, I’m going to go to 7/7/07. You know, that might be one example or just the people that put the barbell down an even numbers versus, you know, getting to 17. What are some of your methods for helping people? Burst through that.

Fern:
I think some of that is how you brief the workout. So I think you can if you brief the workout that I want that I want the reps on on these rounds unbreak. So for instance, yesterday we did yesterday because yesterday we did a workout that was 10 down to one power clean. And then. Skier calories in between each round. So fifty five total power cleans, I think. I think they can. Our X plus weight was one sixty five, ARC’s weight was one thirty five and ninety five. And then the calories was fixed, I think it was seven. So five to seven calories. But when, when I brief that workout they told everybody. You should be able to do 10 reps on broken up whatever weight you choose. Now, if you choose to do quick singles, that’s a strategic decision on your part. But it shouldn’t be because you have to do singles. So you just choose not to because you want to save your grip and cool. That’s that’s your strategy. But as soon as that barto hits the ground, like I want you picking it up if that’s the case. So I think a lot of it is how you brief it and then a lot. And then the other piece of that is like what you’re doing throughout the warm up. If you’re doing test rounds to to validate or invalidate that decision they’re about to make.

Jason Ackerman:
What’s the. Let’s talk about that. That leads into the RX Month, if you will. A lot of this where we were affirming it quite often happens at the whiteboard. Go check out our whiteboard brief episode. But. What are some of the ways you get your athletes to hit that quote unquote, Rx during this RX month?

Fern:
So there is a learning curve involved there. And so for anybody who’s struggling to wrap your brain around, like what this means is so rather than giving fixed weights, we would potentially give no weights or we would give our weight ranges so we wouldn’t give like one thirty five ninety five we would say. Anything between seventy five pounds to one thirty five is the weight. And then I would describe what should happen with that weight, whether it’s unbroken or max two sets to get to whatever the number is. So that’s one piece of that we would do so we give either no or weight ranges and then we would give rep ranges as well. So we might give rep ranges as high as. 30 like a rep range of 30 reps, where any number within that range of 30 is available to you as long as we can hit the intended stimulus. So those two things as it kind of gets them the opportunity to experiment a little bit, but it also kind of gets people off of this notion that there is some magic behind numbers. It’s really not you know, it like we we made a work out that was all 17 reps, like, OK. Like, it’s probably effective. The reason we have clean rep schemes and Crossfit, like twenty one fifty nine or fifty 40, 30, 2010 is because it’s not an intelligence test. Like I don’t want you having to use an abacus in the middle of the workshop to figure out what your next rep around should be. So I want it to be simple in that respect. So but that doesn’t mean that that’s always the way that it should work.

Jason Ackerman:
So when you’re briefing and what are some of the things that you might say and you know, this could be redundant if you listened to our whiteboard brief episode. Just a good recap and a good refresher, let’s let’s talk about it. Do you remember any specific workouts that you’ve had during that RX month that we can diagnose you?

Fern:
I don’t remember. I don’t no. Off the top of my head, but it doesn’t matter. So what I’ve kind of recently gravitated towards when I get when I brief a workout is I will brief, you know, first I’ll say we’re either time or rounds.

Fern:
So let’s just make something up. Let’s just say it’s let’s just say yesterday. Let’s say it was 12 minutes of the power cleans and skier. So that’s how I breathe it. Guys, twelve minutes. We’re gonna power clean. We’re gonna ski, urg. I want you to be done in something between eight to twelve minutes. So I’ve left out a lot of the more specific stuff and I’ve highlighted or emphasized what’s important, which is these are the two movements involved. This is how long I want it to take.

Jason Ackerman:
And let’s so let’s let’s dive into that. So someone’s listening to this. Next time to lead a more effective whiteboard. Great. Is probably kind of a pyramid of broad, just specific. And that is broad. Like, hey, here’s the workout. It’s not an arm grab. First thing we’re gonna tell people is here’s the parameter. I need you finishing somewhere here. You’re done too early. You probably went too easy. If you’re done, you know, beyond twelve minutes. You bit off more than you can chew. So first things first. Here’s our kind of timeframe. Now what?

Fern:
So then I’ll come back and I’ll talk about potentially the. So in the WIP, we’re brief. There’s kind of three things you want to check. It’s like, what’s the workout? What’s the stimulus? What are my scaling options in that order? Check those three boxes. We could it’s a fair bet that we’ve given a fairly effective whiteboard brief. So what’s the workout? Here it is. It’s twelve minutes of power, clean and skierg. What’s the stimulus? I want you done an eight to twelve minutes and then I go through scaling options. These are the rep ranges that you can choose. These are the weight ranges that you can choose. Here’s kind of what they should look and feel like with that set of 10, whatever way you choose should get you out of there in 10 sets. Meet Max 2, you know, to get there on this year. I want you done in 20 to 30 seconds. 30 seconds is as far right as I’d like to go. And then during the workout, I’m going to test both of those things to make sure that that’s what they’ve dialed up. But at no point if I really put any emphasis whatsoever on a specific number or a specific load.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, and that’s you know, and really when you’re looking at it and we break it down even further, like Fern said, two movements and really for this particular work out, the big sets are the set of 10. So we need to kind of have that parameter there. Hey, you should like, for example, earlier. And I like that explanation a lot. I tell people this. You should be able to go unbroken mid workout if you put it down once. Totally acceptable, because we realize going unbroken could skyrocket your heart rate. So if you need to rest. Sure. And then for this one, a skier is going to take you this long. So now we have these kind of two rules. I like that you have that range of weights. And of course, you’ve probably always have some. Why are some newer athletes or some really strong athletes in this workout? Like you said, it’s probably seventy five to maybe one fifty five. You know, your athletes, everyone should fit in there. And there’s probably no harm in helping some of the less familiar athletes. Dictate what weights they should use, Yeah, they’re studying some athletes.

Fern:
You’re gonna spoon feed and you’re gonna give them the answer. You’re gonna do X, Y and Z. That’s it. Like you don’t get to decide here. I’m in charge of that. For my more experienced athletes, that’s becomes a little bit more of a discussion. Hey, what should I do? Well, you always put seventy five on the bar, so let’s go 80 to 85. Let’s make a slight adjustment there. But I will I still want you to go on un broken enough to push a little bit harder.

Jason Ackerman:
And now, you know, I refer to it as a y build buildup. I like to do this for a few reasons. Why build up a alousi kind of get eyeballs on everybody and make sure they’re not doing too much or too little. But also, look at the logistics. You know, is is that person power playing over in the corner? You know, is there a clear path to the sphere? Is all that stuff? What are some of the tests you might run, you know, and meaning. Do we need to see people do 10 power cleans to prove they can do 10 power planes were skiegru, 7 calories. I think certain things are OK to run at full test of the workout. So what might you do on that? To look at the test?

Fern:
For the for the ski gru I would test that. I would have everybody tested during the warm up once we’ve gone through a progression on how to skie gru. We’ve talked about kind of what the pacing we’re looking for. I’m going to have everybody tested. I’m just gonna tell everybody whatever calorie count you think you’re gonna use for the workout. I want to test it right now. I want you to take note of how long it takes. If it takes 30 seconds right now and we’re fresh. Let bump it down a little bit. But we’re in that 20 second range, which is about how long it should take. Then we’re good for the barbell and probably not going to make everybody do 10. An unbroken power cleans. I’m probably going to make them do five to six. I’m gonna know like you’ll you’ll know you’ll know if they can make it to 10 without, you know, making their heart explode. And then you can and then you can have that discussion there.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, I think that’s a good example. I think for workouts that have mono structural movements, especially the roller, the bike these days, you know, whether it’s a short verse like that, I agree with for no reason. Everyone can’t do a 30 second verse recover for a minute or two. You’ll always have people that don’t want to do it. But I personally feel better when I go hard for a minute or two and then have a couple of minutes to recover. But even if it were a longer domain, you know, one K row or two K, I’ll just let people real hard for 30 seconds and you should be good enough as a coach with your coach’s eye to establish what that will look like in the middle of a workout.

Fern:
Well, I mean, there’s tips and tricks there. For instance, I could have them row a 250. And just then just kind of do some math, you know, and kind of watch everybody is rowing a two minute five hundred meters split sustainable for this athlete, if the answer is pretty competently yes, then we can just take that time, multiply by four and give them a target time and just say, listen, you need to stay within two to three seconds of two minute split. That’s going to put you at whatever this time is going to be for a thousand meters. You know, that’s going to put you at eight minutes or so, not eight minutes, but it’s gonna put you at that at that split time that we want to finish the total distance there for for that. So which would put you up four minutes. Sorry for that.

Jason Ackerman:
And, you know, for those listening, whether you’re a coach, a box or just an athlete, these are all interesting points, right? Athlete Hey, next time you’re like we’re listening your coach, see if you can scale appropriately if you’re a coach. This should help you wipe your great. And if you’re a box and maybe this is something you want to try it, you do it for a month, but maybe encourage people to start for a week.

Fern:
Yeah. So there are some pitfalls to this. Number one, I do think you should have a pretty firm grasp of programming because you are going to have to. You are, were you where you can drop the ball here because it’s all based on the stimulus. So if you give the wrong stimulus for a workout that nobody can hit based on what you’ve designed. That makes me an idiot. And I’m going. I’m gonna really lose some trust there with the athletes. So test them out like this. And this might be one of those months where you have to test the vast majority of workouts so that you can brief it appropriately and give an appropriate stimulus for the workout. That’s what that’s like the biggest pitfall that I see. If you’re gonna do this is like not getting that correct because that just throws the whole thing off. Then nobody gets to hit the X button and the ideas for, you know, for people to get it. And I don’t. I also tell people like I want you to hit the mark 70 percent of the time. You should miss 30 percent of the time because you try to go a little bit faster or you decide to go maybe a little bit heavier. And and let’s learn something. Let’s learn that, oh, maybe that weight is manageable for me at this pace. Or maybe I can do a little bit more volume of more high skilled gymnastics movement or handsand push ups or muscle ups or something of that nature. So the big thing is the coaches like you need to be right when you when you provide that stimulus, because if you’re not, you’re going to run into some problems and you’re gonna get some significant pushback on that.

Jason Ackerman:
But I think that’s an important lesson to discuss. You know, there’s I think athletes are listening to this and they will know who they are. They’re the one to look at a work and immediately figure out where they’re going to break in, you know, how they’re going to split this movement up. And I would encourage you if you’re listening, maybe not every day, but once a week, twice a week, you need to just go all out in the beginning and see what happens. And that was the big lesson I learned for so long. It was all right, a split and not you know, you hear it every year around the open, how you get a game plan. This and I always tell people, is your game planning? It’s really just because you’re not given.

Fern:
You know, I mean, there’s there’s there’s a time and a place for it. I don’t I don’t know that that kind of all out intensity is sustainable every single day. But I do think you need to dip your toe in that water because that’s you know, it’s where a lot of that adaptation happens, both physically and between the years. So but again, it’s not sustainable. It’s it’s it’s that old adage of, hey, game. You don’t it’s not a game day every day. Some days are just training.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. And I would encourage people, you know, whether it’s a friend. Let’s see if we can see this, Fran. But if twenty one thurster tough for you know it’s going to beat you up, do it anyway. And see, there are times we learn, hey, well, I can hang on and pick the bar back up. I’m round two or that demolished me and I rested three minutes before my set of Pull-Ups. But I used to have this argument with the members of my box like you. No dropping the bars just as fast as touch and go. And I’m like, no false. You know, and there’s a reason if you look back on workouts like double grace, never double Grace Froning hangs on to the bar at the end because it’s faster, you know. And then we times I was like, well, let’s do 10 dropping and then we’ll rest and we’ll go 10 touch and go. And it was significantly faster.

Fern:
And I was like, Frazier did it this year. And at the final workout where and the crowd went apeshit when he was doing those snatches at the end, he like did a set of five. And everybody does the arena like lost their mind because he like, he just pulled away. And those five reps, everybody else was doing singles.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. And again, that’s kind of the example I use, like Frazier’s and tias of the world. You know, obviously, they do game plan when they see a workout. But often times like that workout with a you know, it would pass the ball the standard. It’s just like, hey, I’m going to hang on to this bar as long as I possibly can. And, you know, they’re trying to win. So every so often you need to do that. Every so often you need a game plan. You know, that’s the ultimate goal is intensity. And for most people, that’s finishing the workout faster. So whatever allows you to do that is more intense. And sometimes it’s splitting up appropriately and sometimes it’s going to be broken.

Fern:
And that’s that’s up to you as a coach based on your knowledge of the workout, when and when not to recommend that, you know, if it’s a 20 minute AMRAP, probably not a good idea. You know, if it’s a shorter time domain, then it’s probably okay to tell people, you know, let’s go for a ham sandwich here and just see what happens. That’s not inappropriate, you know? But as the time domain moves to the right, we know that intensity will naturally drop off. So those kind of full out. One hundred percent, you know, completely phosphoric creatine pathway. Type efforts is not going to work like you’re gonna fall apart, so don’t do that.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. Yeah, I like that analogy. You know, we recently had Greg having from concept too, and it kind of reminded me of that. It’s just the damper, right? The longer you go and drop, that dampened down a little bit. You know, you’re doing a 20 minute camera. Maybe you don’t hang onto the bar to failure, but you’re necessary. You know, the nice thing about that short one is even if you’re exhausted, you don’t have a whole lot left.

Fern:
Exactly.

Jason Ackerman:
So you talked a little bit about pitfalls. What are some of the biggest successes and wins you’ve had? Some do doing this RX Month?

Fern:
I think A is just kind of reframing like what’s important with regard to our ex, which is, you know, really getting people understand that the stimulus is what important is what is important, because that is the what we’re chasing. And then the other big win, I think, is, you know, allowing people to experiment and really play around with some things that they probably wouldn’t normally play around with, like whether it’s rep ranges or movements. You know, it’s it’s a month is kind of like I wouldn’t describe it as like fast and loose, but like I think the more frequently we do it, the more people get hyped about it because they’re they get they get some creativity with regard to the workouts. And they thought and they start to think about it a little bit more. And it’s much less of this mindless lemmings who walks in the gym and just does what they’re told, because I do want them to think critically. I want, like, you know, smart athletes, not just athletes that are here, just kind of walking around like zombies.

Jason Ackerman:
And oftentimes and I think, you know, coaches fall into this trap. It’s like, hey, scaling his load. Well, yeah, that’s important. But scaling can also be the reps and gymnastic movements. Right. That goes back to what I was saying earlier. A lot of times we did that percentage work, but also the gymnastics was a percentage. Hey, you probably shouldn’t be doing 21 Pull-Ups when you’re Max effort 6 since.

Fern:
Yeah. I mean, scaling is any any of the variables within the power equation. So forced distance or time, so load reps or time are all scaling options because those all have a have a mathematical effect on my power output which is in turn intensity. So you know, think of scaling in all three of those facets. You know, you might not always need to scale the weight. Maybe it’s appropriate to leave the weight heavy and scaled the volume a little bit. You know that that’s also appropriate, you know.

Jason Ackerman:
And, you know, other things I’ve done is, hey, sure. You know, probably not for the workout that we’ve been discussing is it’s a little long. It’s a dear friend. Twenty one. Fifty nine. Get it done early in the class. You know, get get warmed up and maybe start 20 minutes in. So now at 30 everybody’s done. And then maybe at 40 or forty five you challenged people to do it again. But really light and feel the difference.

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah. I mean there’s so many ways to do that. And I think that our next month is for us. It’s a learning month. It’s an experimentation month. It’s a it’s an opportunity to find new data points so that we can take that and move it forward in our training and make better objective, intelligent decisions about what the look what the weight should be, what kind of. Volume in a complex movement we should be using. Or how many reps we should be doing, like do you fall apart at 30 pull ups or do you fall apart at 50 Pull-Ups? It’s important. Find that out.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. And whether you choose to go a full month, a week or just kind of sprinkle in some RX days here and there, I think there’s a lot to learn about it. You’ll you’ll improve your whiteboard, read, feel, prove your members ability to understand and break down workouts. And ultimately, it’s just going to be a good challenge for you and the entire affiliate.

Fern:
In the. It’s funny because the questions you get at the whiteboard, the answer is largely your answer. You’re just going to be saying yes. What about this? Yes. If it puts you in this time frame of reference. What about this? Yes. If it puts you in this time frame reference. What about this? Yeah, the answer is largely yes. If it puts you here. So as we told everybody, I don’t care what you do. If you end up in that, then you mean the answer is yes. I don’t care. I don’t care how you scale it. I don’t care anything. All of that is. Yes.

Jason Ackerman:
And I’m sure. And a lot of people leaving, feeling really proud and accomplished because, you know, the people that never get to hit that rx button during the rest of the year get to hit hard during this time.

Fern:
Yeah, not the long tail of that is people buy in to your coaching and your guidance moving forward.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, and you probably get a few people that, like you said, do step out of their comfort zone. The lady that always uses seventy five puts eighty on the bar and realizes she can do it. So big wins for everybody. We challenge you guys to do it. And if you do do it, let us know how it goes.

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah, it’s like I said, it does take some a bit more forethought in the programming arena and you will probably need to test some of most of the workouts prior to delivering them so that you can frame it up correctly for the athletes.

Jason Ackerman:
And that’s something you should be doing anyway. So whether you’re doing your own programming, whether you buy another bunch of programming, you know, from some of the big ones out there. Spoiler alert, Best Hour Of Their Day programming coming very soon. And you should be testing those workouts and just digging into them and trying to figure out what they’re trying to accomplish.

Fern:
Yeah. So I just think it’s it’s really fun. And it’s and it’s variety. You know, it’s a it’s a good way to kind of to switch things up. An affiliate.

Jason Ackerman:
All right. Well, there’s the R X month, so hopefully you guys enjoyed just something to think about. You don’t have to do it. But if you did, whether you do or don’t do it, it’s something you should be at least addressing at the whiteboard. And hopefully this helps you breathe better because as we’ve alluded to numerous times, that whiteboard reads sets the tone for your class.

Fern:
Yeah. So try it out, guys. And then understand that it’s not just benefit for beneficial for your athlete. It’s beneficial for you as a coach to kind of test your knowledge and understanding of training and stimulus. Set it out let us know.

Quickly and accurately convert audio to text with Sonix.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp4 files to text.

Thousands of researchers and podcasters use Sonix to automatically transcribe their audio files (*.mp4). Easily convert your mp4 file to text or docx to make your media content more accessible to listeners.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2019—it’s fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your mp4 to text, try Sonix today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *