fbpx

145. Dan Uyemura | Push Press inc.

145. Dan Uyemura | Push Press inc.

On today’s episode, Jason Chat with Dan Uyemura owner, and one of the three founders of Push Press inc. Dan’s background is computer software ing. By having a computer/desk job, dan admits that it caused him to put on weight which leads him to Crossfit. After taking his L-1 and opening the gym, he realised that the CrossFit space was in need software was user-friendly and didn’t create more work for the owner. Being a box owner, Dan used everything he knew about running a box and what is needed from the software to create something that can help people. 

Timestamp:

(01:27) Background 
(05:05) Programming world coming together with Crossfit.
(06:25) Things that use annoy about your old bosses, that you now do?
(08:15) The tipping point for Push Press inc?
(10:23) What the software actually need
(11:09) How Push Press is Different?
(14:59) Letting coaches coach
(17:16) Push Press professionalizing the gym space 
(19:56) Running a gym as Business, not just Hobby
(20:56) Switching to Push Press 

Social Media: 

IG: @PushPress 

Twitter: @PushPressapp

Website pushpress.com 

We value your feedback. After listening, please hit me up with any questions, comments, or thoughts on how we can make this show even better, and if you enjoyed it, please share it!

Instagram; @besthouroftheirday

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman

Rate/subscribe in Apple Podcasts!

Check out our website – besthouroftheirday.com – to learn more about our private coaches development group.

Dan Uyemura.mp4 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Dan Uyemura.mp4 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2020.

Jason Ackerman:
All right, welcome back to Best Hour of their Day. I'm here with Dan Uyemhra. Did I say that correctly, Dan?

Dan Uyemura:
You did. Good job.

Jason Ackerman:
Oh took bit a little practice. I was a little nervous, but we nailed it. Now, Dan, you're the owner slash founder of Push Press.

Dan Uyemura:
That is correct. I'm one of the three founders. I don't take all the credit, but I'm an owner or founder.

Jason Ackerman:
You know, I've owned a few businesses and I've had some by myself, some with partners. How is that working for you?

Dan Uyemura:
Beautifully for this one. I mean, I've been part of bad partnerships and I've been part of this one's a great one. I mean, that's a whole discussion we could have on partnerships. I'm I'm a big advocate of partnerships, even though I've been on the bad end of them, too. But push presses is working beautifully.

Jason Ackerman:
It's like dating. Right. Just because you have a bad relationship doesn't mean you're never going to date again.

Dan Uyemura:
Yeah, you know what, that's it. I always liken it to marriage, but hopefully you don't have to get remarried. Yeah, so it's it's a marriage. But yeah, just because it doesn't work out doesn't mean that there's not the very important pros that come with it.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. And it's a marriage typically. You know, it doesn't involve some of the fun stuff that goes along with marriage. Right.

Jason Ackerman:
And that's I guess making money can be fun. Right. Let's let's really talk all about push press. You know, you're involved in the Crossfitters world these days. But what got you guys started?

Dan Uyemura:
Man, it's kind of a long story, which if you've got time, I've got time. I've been an entrepreneur and a programmer my whole life. So I came out of college. Right. The Internet was kind of coming up and I naturally kind of followed that arc into being a programmer for a bunch of startups. That was what kind of like got my juices flowing.

Jason Ackerman:
Any any one thing we would be familiar with, like where you go first into Google?

Dan Uyemura:
If I was, I wouldn't be here. I was I worked for some AOL properties. I worked for MySpace for a while. I worked for a bunch of other startups that were, you know, nobody pride as another household name.

Jason Ackerman:
Did you know Tom?

Dan Uyemura:
I actually came in after Tom was already gone.

Jason Ackerman:
Oh okay. You know, that's that's probably over a lot of our listeners heads, by the way, we don't. We'll never remember getting automatically requested by Tom on MySpace, which is a sad, sad thing.

Dan Uyemura:
They're missing out. Yeah. Yeah. So I was. I was a programmer at all. A lot of these startups. And during this time, they basically had this trick where they would feed you dinner every night to keep you at your desk working, which all of us fell for. And it would always be like spaghetti dinners or something like that. And, you know, I put on like 20 pounds over the course of seven or eight years of working in the space. And decided that I needed to lose that weight as fast as I could. And everything. Everything I do is like as fast and as ambitiously as I can.

Jason Ackerman:
For time.

Dan Uyemura:
Oh, for a time. Exactly. But I didn't realize it. I didn't know about Crossfit, the time. But so, you know, my exploration process took me to 100 day push up challenge took me to I forget what the other one was. It was a beach body property. And then and then eventually took me to Crossfit,, which I absolutely fell in love with. And I remember being in the first work out of fundamentals class at my gym thinking like, this is it, I'm done. I found my fitness routine for like I'm good. Which of course snowballed into me wanting to learn how to coach, taking my L-1 shadowing coaches at that gym and then eventually helping someone open a gym and then opening my own gym.

Jason Ackerman:
So what gym, did you start out was your first affilate?

Dan Uyemura:
So the first affiliate that I opened was LAX Crossfit, over here in L.A..

Jason Ackerman:
Zagar Andrew Andy Mechanics?

Dan Uyemura:
No, that's L.A. Fitness. It's = Crossfit L.A., which is not to be confused with L.A. l._a._x. Like for the airport. Crossfit, guy. And he was in a few years before we were. So anyways, we opened that gym and kind of in doing so we realized that the software's space. Well, we already realized the Software space was kind of a wreck in terms of what we knew, what would be good software for gyms because we like I built software. And so part of the reason we opened this gym was kind of an exploration into like, is there any good software out there? Maybe we should build some software for this. So we opened the gym mainly because we love Crossfit, and kind of on the backburner was like, let's check out the software space and see if this is something we can do as well.

Jason Ackerman:
So does that kind of take this newfound hobby that you love and turn it into something that you don't enjoy anymore?

Dan Uyemura:
No, actually, it took many, many. I still enjoy Crossfit,. I just don't do it as much as I did. I got phase where most most owners really got this phase where they're like, I never get to work out anymore. I'm just like a gym all day, but I never work out. Oh, for sure. I hit that days, but I still love it and I always did love it. It's just more of the resentment of like I'm literally here 10 hours a day and I can barely get a 30 minute workout in. You know?

Jason Ackerman:
So so tell me about some of the things you learned in your experience in your time working for others in the programming world that you guys do at push press now to help grow.

Dan Uyemura:
So to me, that's the most interesting aspect of all this is like I learned a lot of stuff in the startup space as an employee. Now that I'm, you know, a founder of a company that's in the software space, I'm learning a ton more in terms of like how to run a business of this magnitude. And what I'm learning is everything that applies to the business world applies to a gym like one for one. Exactly. It's crazy. So that's not the business that I'm in is called software as a service. And the idea is you have to attract customers, get them to sign up. They're going to pay your recurring monthly fee. You need to put a product in front of them that they love and then you need to give them great customer support or a results. And what does that sound exactly like a gym? Right. It's the exact same way. So I just have gone through this like two year process of learning from the best of the best in the software space of how to run a better business. And the whole time I'm like, dang, this is exactly what gyms need. Like everything I'm learning is exactly I had to I just have to we just have to tweak it a little bit. And gyms can use this. And that's kind of what we're in the process of working on now.

Jason Ackerman:
Now that your owners, what's one thing they used to frustrate you about your old boss is that you realize now in retrospect, they were actually doing a good job.

Dan Uyemura:
Oh, there's so many like just managing people, places and times is a hard job. And a lot of times from the other perspective, you're just like, why can't why can't they just get this this together? Why are there so many inefficiency there? Why do we have so many meetings? You know, like I've noticed, a lot of my day is basically just blocking off times for meetings with people. And it's kind of like from my role and again, if you want to play this to a gym, from a gym owners role, your role should end up being facilitating other people to do their job really well, which means you just got to meet with them and talk talk them through their problems and help them with whatever they're getting stuck on. So I remember being a software engineer thinking like I have my days meetings, how can I get any work done? But the reality is like you need those meetings to kind of like get clarity to the process. Communicate back and forth. What needs to happen or what the expectations are. And then so you can set the right expectations for the delivery of the product.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, there's something to be gained with that face to face right now. Just that brainstorming opportunity and talking it out with other people.

Dan Uyemura:
Absolutely. Like this is, I think, something our culture is missing today. And it's something I think is big in our gym space. It's called I call it relationship building. It's one of the core values of push press. And I think it should be absolutely one of the core values of every single gym out there. Like when you're spending time face to face with somebody, you're giving them something that they don't get. And 90 percent of the rest of their life, which is all virtual communication, you know, e-mails, texting and non Face-To-Face stuff, building time with somebody face to face and asking them like, how is your day going? How how is your relationship at home? Like, how are things I care. My her a lot. You know?

Jason Ackerman:
So you're involved in this Crossfit, world, you're a computer programmer. What was the kind of tipping point or what was that moment where you're like, hey, there's some software applications out there, there's gym management software, but we need to start our own.

Dan Uyemura:
So the the actual exact moment was when at my gym, the gym owner wanted us to buy foam rollers and I was buying in like no other, I was buying into everything I could. Nutrition classes and foam rollers and shoes and everything I could. And he sent out a link for us to buy the foam roller. And through the platform he was on. I spent 30 minutes trying to figure out if I had a password, trying to understand if I had account, going to the process of setting up an account and getting redirected somewhere else. And again, as a software engineer, I'm like, this is utterly unacceptable. So I'm getting more and more frustrated as the minutes are taking by. And this is kind of back in the day when there weren't Crossfitters everywhere. So this gym was 30 minutes away for me and I remembered about 30 minutes into this. I'm like, it would've been faster to just get in my car and drive there at this point. So that's why that's what I did. I literally got in the car. I drove to the gym, and I'm about an hour into this journey and I'm like, give me my foam roller. And I kind of threw the 20 bucks and I'm I'm like, here's your 20 bucks. Give me my foam roller. Your system sucks. Like, I was so mad. And it's kind of like as a software engineer, it's like it violated all of these principles and rules that we had been taught not to do, and I'm like, how is this happening right now? This makes no sense. That was the tipping point where like I have to look into this to see if this is a solution worth working on. And it turns out it was.

Jason Ackerman:
What was the timeframe from that moment until you actually launched?

Dan Uyemura:
So that was probably in about 2008. It took us until 2010 to open our gym now included like me getting an L1 and shadowing, coaching and all that. Finding some partners open the gym. In 2010, we actually built like two versions of push press that we threw away and that was all from like learning gym operations for on the ground level and then making friends with a bunch of gym owners that we realized like what we assumed was wrong.

Jason Ackerman:
What were some of assumptions?

Dan Uyemura:
So I remember like the first product we built, we thought what is billed as a WordPress plugin because everyone uses WordPress and it'll be like we'll build workout tracking right into the right, into WordPress and all this stuff. And then we kind of realize that like the man now to the stuff you needed to do to build the software, to run the gym could not just live within WordPress. It wasn't possible throught it that way. The next thing we did was like, we don't want on top of them or a standard merchant processing platform. And then we realized really fast that merchant processors were basically robbing gym owners. So that's how I interpreted it from their terms in their contracts and the way they structured things. And that's not what I wanted to represent. So we quickly moved away from that. Those were like two pretty quick pivots we made.

Jason Ackerman:
So now that you've been around for quite some time, many of our listeners are either box owners or coaches, you know. And I'm not obviously sure what they're using. What are some things that help distinguish push press from all the others out there?

Dan Uyemura:
I mean. I would just say it. I think it all stems from the fact that we own gyms and pretty much everyone we hire on the product side in terms of customer success. And, you know, consultations and stuff like that own gyms. We've built this product in a different lens. I feel like a lot of products are kind of read replicas of each other because there's like one huge company in this ecosystem and everyone's kind of copy them because they've done it right. And I think they've done that because they they didn't own gyms. They don't own a gym. And so what you do is you copy the big a hundred pound gorilla. Our system has been kind of designed differently. It's been designed from different paradigms and concepts. And they are centric around basically. You probably have a single owner operator or they've got a couple partners. They might hire a couple of coaches, but they're doing most of the work there, probably on the gym floor a lot. You know, like a lot. And I feel like building the software from that lens has made us focus on being like operationally efficient for whoever is running the software.

Jason Ackerman:
So what are some things that a boxer might not realize you've done because of that? You know, I own three affilate in the past. I have used every software out there. You know, we started with cashing checks before moving to PayPal, before running through all of the other ones out there. Well, what are some of these things you're referring to that I might not even have been aware of?

Dan Uyemura:
Yeah. So the biggest one to me, the one I always like to bring forth is the flow of getting a person who's coming to a class into a class. Let's just start even with a lead, a lead into a trial class into the class and on the gym floor. What I see a lot of gym owners will do like a hey, contact me if you're interested, which will turn into an email. E-mail terrible because you lose it. You like how many emails a day you get if you don't reply to it right away, it just falls to the bottom of the stack and that person's gone. And this person is legitimately interested in your business at that point. So we we started our process with actual like a lead funnel. So it actually goes into the software and becomes a lead funnel that is nothing new with that other system to do that. Lead funnel kicks off a wavering process or a documentation process which could be tied to like a membership plan. So if you have like a 12 month agreement plan, it will kick off a document that they have to agree to for that plan. When they come into the gym, we have a checking system. Again, nothing new, a lot of a lot of systems up checking systems, but our checking system is gated by payment and documents. So let's say you sign up for a twelve month plan, but you haven't signed your waiver or your doc at your agreement online.

Dan Uyemura:
And and because of that, you haven't paid. Well, one day you check in, right. Or even if you have paid, but you haven't agreed to the agreement, it won't let you check in. What we saw like a lot times a coach on the floor is the one trying to manage all this stuff. So it's kind of difficult to know if everyone's paid and everyone sign other documents. So what we do is we built a TV screen system which integrates with the document or the checking system. So if they've checked in, their name shows up on a really nice branded screen that looks like your gym. And if your name doesn't show up, it means you haven't checked in. And if you're standing in front of me on the floor and you haven't checked in, I know in the back of my mind something's wrong or you're being lazy one or the other. So I'll probably kindly remind you, please go check in. And if you tell me you can't, then I'll say, OK, cool during warm up. Let's talk about it. Let's figure it out. What is what the problem is? And then that way, as the coach on the floor, without having to pay attention to anything other than the TV screen, you know that the whole process has taken place. Right.

Jason Ackerman:
Right. Isn't that one of the biggest issues that goes down at an affiliate? This person is here for their hour to do one thing really well. And that's coach. But their attention is being. Brought in so many different directions because, yeah, I've got to check people and I got to get the waiver signed. I have to make sure that person's membership is good. And then the one thing that can distinguish your gearbox from all these others is coaching is not happening because you're expecting them to do all these other things. Well, it sounds like you guys streamline that and make it a lot easier at the box level.

Dan Uyemura:
Yeah, I mean, well, we want the coach, really, like you said, should be focused on coaching and providing that excellent experience on the floor or but they're also kind of the gatekeeper. So if they notice you haven't checked, then all they have to say is like this is a conversation we need to have later. We can do this after class. But like we both understand now that something's wrong. And LAX Crossfit,, we had a joke because we would sign a punchcard plan. This is before we go push Brathwaite. We had a punchcard plan and it became a running joke that like the annual membership at Lake Crossfit, is 150 bucks because you buy a 10 card punch card and they'll never check you in. And a coach will never know if you check in and therefore you can buy it once and just come for the rest of your life. And it was an awkward conversation for a coach to have because they didn't know if you checked in or not and that, you know, like it. We took we were trying take all that awkwardness out and just make it. Everyone understands there's a problem. We'll deal with it after class or when I have downtime.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. And, you know, I can speak from experience as a coach and a box on it. Those are. Say embarrassing, but they're frustrating conversations and they're awkward. You know, no one likes to talk about money. And, you know, coaches. That's not what they signed up for. They signed up to help people move better. And all of a sudden, you know, they go around chasing, asking people to collect dues. And your goal would be to make it easier to give. You did not diversify your coaches attention and bandwidth and have you just focus on the one thing you're there for, just coaching.

Dan Uyemura:
Yeah. And even speaking to that, like we've built an automatic like like credit card re updater. So like we've looked across our system and 83 percent of failed payments get fixed without the gym owner even having to deal with it. It just the system takes care of it.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, thats thats, That's always a big struggle too. Yeah, I get those e-mails. Hey, so-and-so's payment failed. Cool. Now I have to do more work as it's happening for us. I saw recently you had posted that push press is going to help focus on making gyms more professional, you know, professionalize the coaching space. What what does that mean? We hear that throwing out a lot. You know, everyone's professionalising this or that. What do you guys mean by that?

Dan Uyemura:
So like specifically, I'm going to be repackaging all of this stuff. I'm learning on how to run a better SASC business software as a service for these gym owners to use in their gym, which is service as a service. So that's everything from lead lead intake, the types of metrics and ratios you should be looking for sales tactics and techniques, how to perfecta demo, how to perfect your sales script reps, how to make sure your coaches are kicking ass on the floor. The whole nine are running a gym. And again, that kind of comes from like I've ran a gym. I've I've hired and managed coaches and I'm also running this other business that's very parallel with what they're doing. And what's interesting is like in the SAS base, there's a hundred million dollar companies, billion dollar companies that are being run by these principles that I can actually apply to gyms. So like you're getting the best of the best like MBA is. I've been putting their brainpower to these things and we can we can get them into gyms and getting gym owners thinking that way.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, and isn't that true? For some reason, gym owners have this mentality of like, well, I'm not really a business.

Dan Uyemura:
Yeah, that kills me, it kills me.

Jason Ackerman:
Have you seen that in three since 2008 when you first got started in Crossfit,?

Dan Uyemura:
Yeah. A thousand percent. I mean, back in the day, it was a perfect storm combination of I'm I love fitness. I love Crossfit,. I'm going to open this grungy gym cause grungy is cool and hardcore people will come in the end. It's like self-selecting. Like we didn't we never had to advertise anything at L.A.X Crossfit, like every fundamentals class was sold out weeks in advance because people wanted Crossfit, so bad. Now there's a ton of competition, there's new fitness things out there and you know, like these orange there is an F forty five are competing for the same people. So now it's like all of these fitness professionals who are running gyms now need to learn how to become business professionals. That's that is where we are right now. And I think it's massively improved. But we still got a long tail of gym owners that we can help improve.

Jason Ackerman:
What are some of the things you did when you made that decision to make sure your gym was run like a true business and not just as a hobby?

Dan Uyemura:
Right. So, I mean, there's so many facets to it. It's literally it's one of those things where even if you're focused on it, you probably will never become 100 hundred percent good. But I remember that like some of the first things we did, we put a lot of attention to brand. We put a lot of attention to aesthetic. We tried to make sure our gym was clean, which I've been looking back on it like clean. That is not the same acceptable standard for clean now. We tried to be unique. We tried it. We really tried to be consumer friendly. So we chased the long tail. Not athletes. So it was all about helping, you know, the teacher or the engineer in our community versus helping someone get a D1 scholarship somewhere. And it was all about kind of that message and that that vision of our company that we tried to put out there.

Jason Ackerman:
So if someone is listening and you're like, OK, I like the idea of this, how simple or challenging is it to switch platforms, to push press?

Dan Uyemura:
On both hands, it's more it is a challenge to switch your. I mean, it is disruptive for your business. I won't lie. I think it's a lot less challenging than people will assume it is. Like we've asked again, we we sat in your seat and we've kind of built our migration platform and we have customer success representatives who understand how to do it. But it is it is disrupting. And I think kind of the bigger potential disruption is we like to get gem owners looking at their business and saying like, is what you're doing right now the best way or can we help you make it better, which is even more potentially disrupting if you're gonna change how you like onboard leads or sell your plans or something like that. But the idea here is obviously to help make a better business owner. So that's kind of the direction we're going.

Jason Ackerman:
But at the same time. Push cases actually free? Correct.

Dan Uyemura:
We do have a free platform, yeah. And that's to help. So again, this a lot of everything that we do stems from the vision that we have of being gym owners and being friends with gym owners. And what we realize is like there's a lot of either brand new gyms or there's three categories branded gyms, gyms that underperforming or gyms that it's a site, it's like a garage jammer or something on the side. And they just don't care to ever make, you know, $50000 a month. That's fine with them. Those three gyms are perfect for push press free because where the goal is to either get them off their feet and and really excelling as a gym or it's just to help people who don't make as much money, not have to pay such a high percentage of their income to a platform.

Jason Ackerman:
And have you seen that gyms that successfully switch to push press make more money?

Dan Uyemura:
Oh, all the all the time. I mean, and again, I'm sure that happens with every platform. You know, just the nature of it, depending on where you are in the arc of your business. You might be just starting. Of course, you're gonna make more money, but there's plenty of gyms that have come through that. You know, there's a third or fourth platform. They've kind of tried all the different things. We got them on the platform. We kind of like settle things down and got them going in other, you know, up a hundred percent from where they were. It's all very unique, you know, to your geography, your situation, your gym. I can't meet, you know, obviously make any promises to any of that. But I'll tell you, I'll tell you this much. The people that you will talk to, you like if you get on a call with somebody here, push press. They know what they're talking about in terms of running a gym.

Jason Ackerman:
And I think that's vital. I think that's going to stay really any business in the Crossfit, world and having own boxes. It is frustrating when you're dealing with, you know, and not to knock computer programmers, but they tend this, you know, fit a certain stereotype, if you will. And that doesn't usually lend itself to fitness. So if you get people that understanding that, then through those problems and sure, it makes it a lot easier to deal with.

Dan Uyemura:
Correct. Yeah, yeah. I mean, we're not hiring recent college grads off the street for their first customer support job. Like not most every single person on our success team is actually a Push Press client who owns a gym, who loved us so much, they wanted to work for us. So that's kind of our growth strategy.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, we'll fill me in on some other things that we might not have touched base on that would help people understand why push for us is so valuable, potentially why it would be worth it to them to make the change. And just to educate them more about what push press is doing.

Dan Uyemura:
I mean, I just like to speak from a position of like we are genuinely here to help. We really see ourselves as like the good guy of the industry. And that's not to say anyone else isn't or is a good guy or bad guy, but I don't personally care if gym uses our platform, another platform. I want every single gymm to do better. I think they deserve to do better. They're out there doing great things for their community. Like I've seen the changes of people that I've made in my gym and how much they love my gym. And I know that's happening at all of these gyms across the world. So, I mean, the biggest the biggest thing I can tell you is like we are an advocate for you. Your gym. It doesn't matter if your push press or not. We'll all go. I will take a phone call with you and walk through, talk to things. My team will, too, like we care. That's the biggest thing. I think all of that is personified in our product. And I think it will continue to be part of our product and part of our message. And the reason we're going to do all this education is because we just genuinely care. So, you know, without going into details of what our platform does and specifically how we can help. I think that's the biggest thing that differentiates us from a lot of the competitors is we genuinely care.

Jason Ackerman:
And I think, like you've said and we've reiterated, that's where I come from. Most people don't want a Crossfit, box. They stand because they care. So it's always nice to also be working with other people that feel the same way. And it's evident as soon as you get on the phone and we can tell by talking to you that what you're saying is entirely true versus other people that will make that claim. And many go on the phone and then you can tell right away, hey, that's not what they were telling me.

Dan Uyemura:
Yeah. I mean, our our sales team is instructed like if if we're not a good fit to tell them which company to go to for a better fit, like like if it's a detriment for you to join push press, we will not steer you to join push rest. You know, we can identify that pretty quick and tell you which system to actually you should go to.

Jason Ackerman:
I love it. Well, I highly recommend that people check it out. Is there anything that I have missed that you would like to share with the listeners of best hour of their day?

Dan Uyemura:
I mean, that's the that's the crux of it. I mean, we developed everything we're working on here is is out of necessity for helping gym succeed. Free is to help Jim's who are earning less money. Our education series and podcast that's coming up is to help all gym owners learn how to be a better business person. Our Web sites and local marketing products are to help people be found. And we're going to continue to explore more and more services we can do to help gym owners dominate and do well.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, I think that's great and I really can downplay the value of something you said earlier with just creating those lead magnets and eliminating that additional work. I mean, that's really what it's all about when you're running a small business, maximizing your time and making sure everyone else is.

Jason Ackerman:
That's a part of your team. And if things can be automated the way you guys have laid them out, it's only going to benefit the box and give you more time. And as we've all heard numerous times, you know, that's the most important commodity out there.

Yeah, I think people don't realize a lot of people don't realize it, that systems are kind of what make our day like people talk about getting into the routines. That's just your daily system. Software is meant to help you create systems so you can maximize your time, make you more efficient. I call is a term I use called buying back your time for some gyms. It might not be worth it to have to pay for software or maybe they should use Push Press was free. But at a certain point you're spending so much time trying to do stuff, it's better to pay one hundred hundred fifty two bucks to software to buy back those hours so you can focus on other things. And as you grow and grow your business, you want to expand your system isation and buyback more and more time so you can focus on the most important things. The most valuable things. That's the goal of software.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, and they know those valuable things. We know whether it's on a personal level or just giving back to the box. That's what people want. You know, your members don't really care what software you're using, but they care that they're getting a great product and great coaching. And you know that you are making it the best hour of their day in order to do that. You have to have time to take care of yourself. And it sounds like that's what Push Press will have you do. So really awesome. I'd hope that some people will certainly make a change. And if not, at least just go check it out and reach out to Dan and reach out to his team. If you have any questions.

Dan Uyemura:
Awesome. Thank you for that. I wasn't just here to pitch, push, press. I want to help people. But I mean, I always appreciate that.

Jason Ackerman:
If, you know, if it sucks watching her, it's helping them win for everybody. Right. Having owned three affiliates, I can tell you it gets busy. There's always something to be doing. And at the end of the day, it comes down to the product. Like you said, there's you know, whether it's orange theories or f45s or all these other local boutiques out there. It's going to come down to how well do you coach and how much better is your facility at helping others improve than if you're wasting time on a computer you're not developing as a coach.

Dan Uyemura:
Correct. Absolutely.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, damn it. Where can people find out more about you and about your company?

Dan Uyemura:
I mean, they could find us online at push press dot com spelled just like the movement, but it's one word push press.

Jason Ackerman:
Did you guys you guys have to struggle to get that URL. Do you get it right away?

Dan Uyemura:
It was owned by somebody else. I don't remember who at this point. They got us for some money on it, but we believed in that name so strongly because remember, we were gonna be a WordPress plugin. So we're like, oh, push press. It's like, you know, like WordPress. So we believe and it was a double on Tonda with the movement and we didn't want to name ourselves was something or Crossfit, something. We wanted to name ourselves something ambiguous, but very strikingly like a shot out to the Crossfit, community because that's where we came from. So yeah, we did spend some money for it, but we were OK with that.

Jason Ackerman:
Worth it. Thank you. Check it out. Push for a stop and they can follow you guys on all social media platforms. Is it all just Push Press?

Dan Uyemura:
With the exception of Twitter, I think which is Push Press app, which for the push press.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, well, that's really great to hear. And I'm sure if you have any other questions you can follow. But then the team is a pleasure to learn about push press and hopefully spread the word.

Dan Uyemura:
Awesome. Thank you so much.

Jason Ackerman:
Thank you very much, Dan.. Have a great holiday.

Dan Uyemura:
You, too.

Quickly and accurately convert audio to text with Sonix.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp4 files to text.

Thousands of researchers and podcasters use Sonix to automatically transcribe their audio files (*.mp4). Easily convert your mp4 file to text or docx to make your media content more accessible to listeners.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2020—it’s fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your mp4 to text, try Sonix today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *