151. Affiliate Websites

151. Affiliate Websites

On today’s episode, Ackerman and Fern talk about one of the things you didn’t realise you had to be good at an affiliate owner- website design. But do you really need a website nowadays in the world of social media? The answer is yes. It’s the face of your business. It will be looked at by potential members and drop-ins, and it will decide if they walk through your door or not. Ackerman and Fern discuss the ways to use your website as a tool for your business, not a hindrance. Also, they give their opinion on where or not its something to spend money on.

Hey, team don ‘t forget! Jason new book Best Bour of Their Day is out now!

Our new Box Tour Series Out now! Make sure you go check it out!

Timestamp: 

(1:52) Fern’s stories
(6:36) Myspace – do you remember it? 
(11:22) Are website in the Crossfit space becoming obsolete? 
(13:34) Stop giving out your personal information.
(15:00) Only 3 functions on your website 
(17:24) New website pay or not to pay?
(22:20) Chasing leads from your website
(22:35) Things not to do.
(27:41) Are blog still relevant?
(30:01) How to repurpose.
(33:30) You need a website 

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Jason Ackerman:
All right, best hour of their day is back. And today.

Jason Ackerman:
You know, we’re talking about something that accidentally as a box owner, you have to become an expert on. And I think that there are so many what are some other things we can think of for what are some things that by opening Crossfit, rife, you didn’t realize you would become good at?

Fern:
Psychiatry, plumbing, electrician, welding, woodwork, carpeting.

Jason Ackerman:
You were probably decent at some of those

Fern:
Web sites. Oh, that’s.

Jason Ackerman:
What we’re here to talk about.

Fern:
merchant processing, social media, accounting, human resources contracts and legal.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. Are you reading a list right now or these are the top of your head?

Fern:
Those are literally just off the top of my head.

Jason Ackerman:
It’s so true because we open these boxes, we open these businesses because we love trading people. And I I just got off the phone call with an accountant today, and it reminded me of like how I when I first opened Albany Crossfit,, I opened it as a C corp. And no one tells you anything about this. I went over to a we the people, which was right next door to the gym. And like, you know, they say, well, this is a C-Corp and this and that. Am I right? Sign me up for one of those. And, you know, little do you know at the time, like how much tax implication, you know, all these different things. You just think, I just want to train people.

Fern:
When I first created an LLC, I literally had no idea what LLC meant.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, I still dont. And I’ve had multiple we have one together that I don’t know what it means.

Fern:
And we’re the experts, guys.

Jason Ackerman:
So what was your worst plumbing mishap?

Fern:
We. I mean. Well, I guess it’s not plumbing. We had a pretty severe roof leak a couple of years ago during a seminar that was really bad and there was a horrific storm. And so we had to deal with a bunch of leaky ceiling tiles and flooding. What else? Now, that’s some pretty severe electrical issues in the past because the building we are in is like 30 years old. There’s not a ground wire in the joint, but I was loading up on a ladder yesterday as I’m trying to move a vending machine. We have because there’s like an outlet up there. I have no idea if the outlet works, if there is running power to so im, a 15 foot ladder with the volt meter trying to figure out if there’s any anything running to this wire. So, yeah, the number of things that you have to be competent as a as a gym owner is astronomical. And that’s a business owner. And it’s not unique to gyms, but.

Jason Ackerman:
No but what is unique to gyms especially. I believe, as you know, they tend to be brick and mortar, obviously, where like in the virtual space, like best our some other companies that we’re involved in. You know, you have to learn other things to learn Shopify or Stripe or, you know, like.

Fern:
They tend to be a little bit more tech savvy because your world is virtual. So. Yeah.

Jason Ackerman:
But yet, regardless, I mean, and I’ve told people this numerous times and government makes it challenging for small businesses. And now that they’re like assholes about it. But there’s no like playbook or there’s no set of rules like, hey, make sure you do this or, you know, make sure at the end of the year you’ve saved money because, you know, you’re paying yourself that you’re not paying taxes like all that stuff. I mean, really, that’s what we’re here for. If you have questions about any that we’ve done it numerous times and we’ve messed up numerous times, so we’re happy to help.

Fern:
Well, luckily luckily, the and I’ve I’ve referred to this in the past is that Crossfitters is like this weird, very unique, self-sustaining ecosystem. So everything that you would ever need in the gym sprung up out of the community as a service provider to somebody like the amount of SAS businesses that exist in the Crossfit, ecosystem that have that work that did not exist before. Crossfit, that now. Have carved out a niche. Lane in the Crossfit, community for Crossfit, gyms is astonishing. I mean, you think about accounting John Briggs and Incyte tax you just launched, you know, profit first from Micro Gems. You think about Jim, a mentoring with two brand with Chris Cooper. You think about Web sites. I mean, there’s a ton of companies that do that site, right? There is up launch. There’s I think there’s three, two, one, go. Waterfind, how does Web sites you have gym membership softwares. I mean, like you have Waterfind, you have push press, you have SHUGAR. What you have is in planner or you have mind body online. I mean, the number of things that like people that Roeg. However, I mean, however many hundred million dollar business that did not exist 10 years ago that basically sprung up solely to support the Crossfit, community and now has expanded it to other things.

Jason Ackerman:
I think that’s one of the most amazing things about Crossfit, is any any as a lot of people want to hate on and bash Coach Glassman But I’m sure there is a way back in the day that he could have been like, I want a piece of everything. Oh, cool. Bill and Katie, you’re starting this little equipment company. Let’s slap Crossfit, on it. And by the way, I own 20 percent.

Fern:
I’d be curious what the the overall ecosystem was worth and dollars,.

Jason Ackerman:
Right? Not just Crossfit, alone, but everything. A billion dollars. I don’t know.

Fern:
Well, everything that’s involved in Crossfit,. So all of the all of the SAS businesses, the equipment businesses, the the everybody that’s attached directly to the Crossfit, space.

Jason Ackerman:
I mean, it’s for sure a billion dollars, but I’ll tell you what, bumped it over a billion, his best hour of their day for sure, all listeners Crossfit, was floundering in the red. Going out of business and best hour of their day, you’ve got McCrimmon, Xav, Save the Day. But let’s talk about website. So I’m going to I’d like to throw out some funny stuff back in the day. You mean Crossfit, does is they say, hey, you want to be an affiliate, need two things. You need insurance, you need a Web site. And they used to say you need to point to the Crossfit, Journal. I don’t know if they still say that.

Fern:
I believe they still do say that because it does exist. But I’m pretty sure that’s still in the affiliate agreement.

Jason Ackerman:
So before starting my own Web site. My first kind of virtual thing on the online was actually the Albany Crossfit, MySpace account.

Fern:
Myspace. Oddly enough, I never had a MySpace account and I actually held off for a long time getting a Facebook account.

Jason Ackerman:
I held off on Facebook for a bit because I was like, I don’t have time. And MySpace was crazy. But yeah, no first thing ever was. Hey, we’re gonna be in Albany, Crossfit, MySpace. I don’t even remember how some I made a logo somewhere online. Like, remember, like there is big Microsoft Paint or whatever, but it even looks like I was sitting there drawing the letters. Albany.

Fern:
That’s another thing that you have to learn as affiliate owners like graphic design and artwork and videographer.

Fern:
Yeah, just a little. If you’re listening to this, he makes up for social media. Go check out Cannava. We’re not even sponsored by them, but I think I think they’re a great way to just make quick, easy social media posts that someone here in.

Fern:
Canava would like. There’s a couple of big ones in there. Canberra later over is a nice one. Headliner is pretty easy.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. People ask us how we make our. You know, images every day on best hour of their day Instagram with the quotes from the people that we’ve interviewed. And we use something on line called headline or so hopefully a couple of those little things help you out. But yeah, I went from MySpace to a company called Type Pad. And you heard of Taipans?

Fern:
I have heard of type pad. Not in a decade. But yeah.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, back in the day, that was the way to go. There wasn’t all these other, you know, villager Web site things. And I believe Crossfit, was using type ad at the time. Which is why I went to them. But man. I spend hours on my Web site every day, like adding widgets, adding just just trying to make it was like the face of your business. I so much pride in it.

Fern:
Now, here’s the question what was the primary? Function of your Web site in 2010. We’ll call it 2007 to 2010. What was the what did you use the Web site for?

Jason Ackerman:
People went to it every day. My members,.W

Fern:
What would they go to it for what were they there for?

Jason Ackerman:
They wanted it. I would do. I mean, I’m. You cannot understand how much time I put into it. Every night I’d go home and somedays I would do it twice a day. A morning posted an evening post about what happened at the gym that day, who had PR what to work. I was what are some of the fun things that happened? I would put every picture that I took and it wasn’t on my iPhone. Make it easy to upload, you know, as a digital camera to take the card out, put it on my computer, upload.

Fern:
You take a picture literally and you take a Polaroid, scan it, and then upload that scan of the Polaroid to your computer.

Jason Ackerman:
It took about that much time. But, you know, you can only upload twelve pictures at a time on type that. And I would go home and have like 200 plus pictures and didn’t edit anything.

Jason Ackerman:
Didn’t want to delete any pictures. But, you know, I’d wait like two minutes, upload the next twelve, you know. Meanwhile, the girl I was dating. No wonder it didn’t work out. She’s downstairs. Probably like what’s happening hours up there,.

Fern:
He’s watching porn up there.

Jason Ackerman:
She would have rather that, I think. But as you know, the men looking back, I don’t think I could have built the community I built without it. It was it was so unique at the time.

Fern:
There was, though. So something like that. Yeah. I saw where I was going with that is if you had two buckets of people, you have potential customers and customers, who is going to your Web site?

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, that’s a great question. At the time, it was primarily my current customers.

Fern:
Now there was somebody used it for it. It was a most people. Their website was basically the most basic function of WordPress and all they did was push their wad to the blogs so people could check it. They’re like, that’s what everybody use the website. It was not it was not to disseminate information or content or capture any information. It was literally just to read the workout. That’s it. The end. No more.

Jason Ackerman:
Exactly. Exactly. And you know, from a business perspective, it’s pretty dumb.

Fern:
But nobody knew any better back then, were now? No. Our ward posed to our post, our Web site. But nobody goes there to read it. Not one single person goes there to read it.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, you know, that’s a good question that we’ll touch upon on this episode. But do boxes still push the Wod to their Web site?

Fern:
Some people do. Some people don’t. I mean, I would probably say it’s more do than don’t. I. Think people that don’t try to keep their programming secret, which is dumb. It’s not that it’s not.

Jason Ackerman:
You know, our our Web sites in the general, but specifically in the Crossfit, space becoming obsolete.

Fern:
No, they are still very important. They just have to be optimized for mobile and they have to be. They have to be built with this very specific intention, which is generally not for your current customer base. They should be built primarily to house content and capture information so that you can reuse that information just like every other corporation uses that information.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, I just you think.

Fern:
I want to. I want a house. I want a house content there. And then I want to capture people’s information as they go to the Web site, whether they’re watching a video or listening to a podcast, reading an article, looking at pictures. And then I want to track that traffic so that I can follow up and give them more of what it is that they’re looking for.

Jason Ackerman:
Right. And that’s really what they’re becoming, where, you know, a Web site. And it still is like kind of like the window into your business. Right. Like, I’d go to a Web site and immediately you form these opinions, like these guys are dumb. I don’t want to go there. And whether you’re looking at a Crossfit, affiliate or a restaurant. Right. We went out to, you know, for example, Rozin, I went out to dinner on New Year’s and it was supposed to be this fixed menu. So, Roz, night we track. We look at the menu online and then we get to the restaurant. There was a different menu. And we’re like, that’s your website, like who do you. Where does that disconnect happen? But same thing at a box site. If your Web site, shity, you can have the most. Shiny equipment and all that stuff, the gym and people might not show up.

Fern:
Well, the first thing people have to do is be able to give you information so you can contact them or contact you directly. You know, like we’re going through some revisions on our Web site right now. There’s like things that need to be updated. We’re doing some migration and stuff like that. But. What nobody had back in the day was a contact me form.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah,.

Fern:
It was yes, like it was. There was a probably a link to an email that nobody managed or a phone number that they got. And they don’t even have a landline in their gym.

Jason Ackerman:
Oh yeah. Mine was just right to my cell phone. My cell phone would blow up all day. I’d get texts. I’d give it out to everybody. I mean, that’s a whole another topic.

Fern:
Don’t do that. Yeah, that’s a whole other show about like stop giving your personal information.

Jason Ackerman:
At least get yourself a Google Voice line and a minimum separate something.

Fern:
Google Voice 1. That’s a that’s really cheap and very manageable zip whip. Because like you can turn any landline into and I think the cheapest package is like thirty five bucks. But like it thirty five bucks is more than you need. But I can turn any landline into a taxable number. It’s like if you went to my Web site, Crossfit,, life.com, that phone number in there, like you could text that number and that would go to me. And another staff. And it’s not my personal cell phone number, but I could text you back from my phone. So we have people that we have conversations all day long via the business line.

Jason Ackerman:
Right because I’ve got a number yesterday for a business. And the first thing I tried to do is text it and bonce back it.

Fern:
Got open rates for text or something like 90 percent were answer rates for calls that people don’t know. The number is is well under 40 percent.

Jason Ackerman:
Oh yeah. I mean I just it’s just natural like that. A number of connection. I’m going to text you first and then it bounce back. So I had to call. But but yeah, that’s the first thing. So that’s one. You know, keep in mind, nothing we’ve mentioned are paying us. It’s all just things we use, you know, whether it currently or or with boxes. So go check out all of those.

Fern:
So what if you had to have only three things on your Web site for three functions? What would they be?

Jason Ackerman:
Well, like you let me touch upon, you need to have a way to get in touch with you. And I’d probably have my phone number and email on there. I guess I’m not ours, but a phone number and an email that multiple people can check.

Jason Ackerman:
Mm hmm. You would have that. You’d probably have your address. You need people to know where to go. Yeah. Who? What’s the third thing I would have, like you kind of want to say your prices, but I don’t know if I’d put my prices online, if I was limited to three things. What would be your third thing be? Assuming the first two are the same?

Fern:
I think you I think it is a one one percent must the very top of us. Number one thing is you have to have a way to collect information.

Jason Ackerman:
So that be there’d be a great third thing. Right. And when when Fern keeps saying that, mean friends very good at this stuff. But it’s like a newsletter. So whether you have a male champ or clavicle or what do you use for Crossfit,Rife?

Fern:
Well well we have kind of two technically three, which is a whole nother discussion, but so. On our Web site, our Web site is is powered by infusion, soft on the back end, which is a massive effort, which is a massive SAS business, like it’s it’s a software.

Jason Ackerman:
Infusions soft this huge.

Fern:
Yeah, it’s a CRM that’s pretty robust. And then that’s that’s like the primary function that we have there. And then I do use mailchimp because there is a lot of flexibility within mailchimp to create campaigns in the segment. That’s mailchimp pretty pretty user friendly and you can connect those two. So like I can like it. I can have an API that automatically updates contacts as they come into infusions off to populate mailchimp. And then I just go in there and clean. I was actually like segmenting them this morning.

Jason Ackerman:
There’s so much to learn. There’s so much to learn out there. So what are some of the you know, let’s tell the audience here. This conversation came because we had an e-mail and we get a lot of e-mails, asked.no podcast topics. And the discussion about Web sites was one of them. This was a new affiliate and asking questions. So. So let’s start from that ground level. Someone is either opening a new box or maybe they have a parent box in it thinking about revamping. Did they go with a company and do they try to do it on their own?

Jason Ackerman:
You and I are both pretty. I mean, well, you’re this way because you’re Jewish, but you and I are both very like Bootstrap has lost our eight Jewish listeners Let’s let’s be real in one of the one.

Fern:
I think on the front end, because I and I told somebody who contacted us this morning about about programming. They’re like, hey, I want to do programming. And I told them straight up, like, I don’t recommend you pay for programming right up front. Like, I just don’t think it’s a cost that you need to incur.

Jason Ackerman:
You’re trying to destroy a business before we launch. Is that what’s happening?

Fern:
No. It’s called being genuine and giving people good advice, even if it doesn’t benfet you the.

Jason Ackerman:
I’m referring to the best hour of their day programming that’s coming out very soon.

Fern:
Yeah. The. If you can do it. I mean, depends places where you’re at, right, so you don’t have to. You know, you don’t have to pay for an ongoing service. Right? Like you can pay minimum. You can pay minimum dollar for somebody to set your your Web site up so that you can capture information.

Fern:
There’s a landing page where somebody gives you name, email, phone number that automatically notifies you via email and has like three basic blogs. You know what I mean? I don’t think it needs to be incredibly robust. It needs to. It needs to be. Honestly, I think it needs to be simple, simple, simple, simple, simple and need to say.

Fern:
Here’s what we do so like get fit. Have fun, like whatever, you know, feel great. Lose weight, like whatever it’s going to be. It should not have a picture of like the fittest person in your gym should have like a picture of a normal human being on there. Somebody looks more like J. Less like me. And then a way and then a way to contact you. Like again, like it doesn’t need to be this crazy thing, but it does need to be. And this is more pertinent now than ever. It does have to be mobile friendly. So you need to check that. You need to check all your Web site, you know, check all your pages on your phone, because if it looks like shit on your phone, it’s the most annoying thing ever. And most people are checking out your Web site from their phone.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. And I think even if you’re doing it the way Fern said, which is going to do it yourself, most of those platforms like let’s use WordPress as an example, has an option to kind of look at what it looks like in the mobile format. I mean, yeah, there’s so many free options out there. You and I. I think I disagree a little bit. To me, the expense of getting someone to start a Web site for you between 250 and 500 dollars should be something you budget in as a new business because and I’m only speaking from my experience in that it’s a time suck.

Fern:
It is a time suck. I wouldn’t I would even say that like upwards of two to three grand wouldn’t be unreasonable for a build out of a Web site that has like.

Jason Ackerman:
A nice one.

Fern:
Yeah. Nice one. Now, if you don’t have that, you can go lower dollar. But I’ve seen Web sites that are just as functional both ways. Generally, they’re just not like the generally what suffers is the is the you X, right? So the user experience suffers a little bit depending on how much you pay.

Jason Ackerman:
So the you guys, you’re listening by the way, and you want someone that doesn’t good Web site cost effective. Check out best out of their day. Dot com. We have a guy I want to put him on blast right now. And I don’t even know if he’s taking new people, but and it is advertising if you want a connection there. He’s a great dude. He’s a part of our community. So we’re happy to introduce you to him. But there are some other places that will. What would you call like a cookie cutter type Crossfit, Web sites?

Fern:
Also, there’s cookie cutter. I want to say, like I know, I do know that Wodfiy is now created like a Web site function. Right. So you can build a Web site that’s at the back end of it is Wodfiy. Now, I have no experience with it. I just know that they offer it sounds.

Jason Ackerman:
It’s probably really smart if you collect payments through Wodify and post or modify. It’s all in one play. Sounds like they’re one of the first people doing that.

Fern:
I’m not aware of anybody else that does it. There’s other companies that do it like like we’ve been using site right for a very long time, which was originally barbell business and the barbell logic.

Fern:
And then it was Jim. Right. And now it’s site. Right. But we’ve had them for like five years. They’re really great. That’s why we have that pretty robust infusion soft back in. But there’s other companies that do it for cheaper. But really, what’s important is they’re just it needs. It all needs to be connected. So, you know, back in the day, I just had a Web site that was separate from however I process my payments. That was separate from my social media. All those things need to be linked to together so that when somebody fills out a form a landing page, just a basic landing page. Hey, interested in Crossfit,? Fill this out. We’ll call you back when they fill that out. That needs to go somewhere. And my recommendation is that it doesn’t go to somewhere and then just sit there. It needs to actually notify somebody. Right.

Jason Ackerman:
So let’s see what time stamp you put. Timeline like you put on that. In other words, at what point is it like we’re not going to get that person back in the day?

Fern:
Some people are like three to five minutes. And I’m like, that’s, if you will, time front desk person. And it and I’m not that. That’s for cold. That’s for cold. Somebody who’s like completely cold. If somebody is a warm lead, like they or they want to buy, like just get back to them like within an hour. But like so for instance, like when somebody hits our Web site, that notification goes to two people. So one of us, you one of them goes to me. The other one goes to CASSIDY. So one of us is going to get it immediately. And then we have parameters for when do we respond? When do we not respond? What’s the time window for when we can text and we can’t text because we’re actually laws on that.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, let me let me dive in a quick rabbit hole there. So say you say you’re doing that and you’re the owner. CASSIDY is not. Is there a motivator for him to get back to them faster and get them to join? In other words, is there. Do you recommend a commission for somebody like that?

Fern:
You can do that. We don’t currently do that. That’s just part of his job.

Jason Ackerman:
And if you’re listening CASSIDY I will raise if you’re listening to this, that gets paid.

Fern:
He gets paid hourly for admin work. Right. And we’ve covered this in coach compensation episodes of Go Back and listen that episode. But that’s just part of his job as the kind of gym management as part of his job. But he knows that if the gym does well, then he does well, he gets rewarded for that.

Jason Ackerman:
That a hard message to related coaches at times.

Fern:
Yeah. Yeah.

Jason Ackerman:
You a good Box’s owner to do that.

Fern:
Yeah. For people to understand what’s good for the goose is good for the gander. Is is a is a pretty broad a pretty broad topic and pretty big concept for people to grasp. But there just needs to be a process just like, hey, when this comes in, what happens? So we generally go with the text first, but we call immediately afterwards. So we’ll get them both. So it’s like text, call, email that we have to check all three of those boxes. Some of it is automated, which with regard to the emails, the text and the phone calls is all us. And here’s what I want to tell you guys. If you’re trying to do automated text campaigns and all of that shit, people know it’s automated. I don’t care how much time you put into it. Like I know that’s not you.

Jason Ackerman:
I agree with you. But I do think it takes a certain level of intelligence to understand that I get. For example, you and I get emails regularly of like, hey, we want to contribute to the best hour of their day. Dot com, I’m like, what do you charge for a post? Yeah. And one, you know, we don’t take them because they’re usually shitty and too they’re usually fake. But I mean there’s there are businesses in the Crossfit, space built around this automated testing. And, you know, to be fair. They’ve gone and made them really good, like pictures change with with names put on them and dates put on them and all of that. I’ve seen people used like. I believe I don’t want to misspeak, but it was like the gym lunch, you know, where it’s like somebody text you. They’re getting these. People fall for that shit.

Fern:
People that stick around for your business don’t fall for that shit. And those are people that are cold sales do fall for it. Like those are people that want sales that are looking for a quick fix. They’re looking for that. And again, again, you can make it automated. And some of the stuff is getting pretty sexy and getting slick. You can put in predetermined responses if there’s a word in there. But I’m gonna tell you, like I’ve played around it, like it eventually it doesn’t match up in the response, doesn’t make sense. So now I’m not saying automation is bad. I would say that, like, you need to have a system in place. And it’s it’s not that damn hard. No, but no Crossfit,, Gym. Let’s put it this way. No Crossfit,. Gym is bringing in so many leads, so many customers, potential customers, potential prospects that you can’t text them yourself.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, and like you said, I mean, I’m not disagreeing, I do think. Texting and phone calls should be done by another human being that understands it, because ultimately you’re going to get a question about something and it can’t just be like. We’ll come in, we’ll show you. A new should be able to do this within three to four techs, if you’re on the phone with somebody for hours and probably wasting your time and not going to join.

Fern:
They’ve contacted you, right? So it looks like keep it on task, which is like, OK. What’s the what should the Web site do? The Web sites should allow them to reach out to me, to give me information so that I can contact them. So that comes through on my Web site. It hits me with an email and I can set up with a text out of the Asian. But I mean, like, you know, frequently and not worry about it. And so is Cassity. Like one of us is here all day long, the long as it’s going to go and scene 60 Minutes. So I’m not that worried about it. We’ll call and we’re immediately going to. There’s like there are automated follow on emails, but all of the phone, all of the text, that’s all personal. And then some of the email is personal because I want to say something very specific other than just like, hey, we missed you. We’ll follow up again tomorrow. Like, I just want that to be in their inbox. So, yeah, I mean, that’s what it needs to be in there for.

Fern:
And then you can use your Web site to host like if you’re a night, if you’re not writing blogs, nutrition blogs, coaching blogs, mindset blogs, if you’re not putting videos like you need to have all that stuff house on your Web site.

Jason Ackerman:
Are blog you’re still relevant?.

Fern:
I read blogs all the time.

Jason Ackerman:
What are two blogs you read regularly?

Fern:
I do read a morning check-up. Right, that’s what that’s actually a pretty robust blog. And.

Jason Ackerman:
Then I guess I don’t consider that a blog. Yeah, you’re right.

Fern:
I mean, if you. It is a blog. Yeah. Once you go to their Web site, it’s a blog because their their stuff hits me every morning. Somehow they got in there. Remember if I opted in, but I went to their Web site, I had to opt in for an email. Right. So on their Web site. And now they hit me every morning wanting checkup. And then I go to Crossfit, economist daily and read through their.

Jason Ackerman:
As Crossfit, also has a blog. Yeah. So. Yeah, it’s just like back in the day, everyone had a blog, everyone was trading a blog. You had a house.

Fern:
You have to house all of that long-form information somewhere. Right. So it’s understanding that like your Web site is this long form permanent. Thing that houses all of your content forever. If you go on Crossfit dot like that’s what it is, it’s like really long articles that I can download as PEF long videos. The email, the social media, those are all chopped up versions repurposed to get interest to then push them to the Web site like you’re not you’re not reading an article like a full blown article in social media. For the most part, like most of it can’t be done. Like you’re going to get a snippet, at which point you have to divert off of that social media and get to a Web site of some sort.

Jason Ackerman:
Some blog is basically where these long form posts are being housed or even maybe just you work out of the day,.

Fern:
Your work out of day if you want to go there. But there’s so many things that you can do using things you can use third party platforms like YouTube or if you have like Blubbery or AIPA or i-Tunes for a podcast, stuff like that, you can embed all of those things onto your Web site. So somebody get me watching a YouTube video from my YouTube Jannik channel that’s hosted in YouTube Via Web site. So they’re still going to YouTube. It’s just Howl’s on my Web site. Because they want to watch the video version of a podcast editor. They want to watch the movement video that we made on rowing or running or the post-work or something like that. But all that stuff is still there and I still haoles. I repurpose emails that I write as blog posts on the Web site.

Jason Ackerman:
You bring up a good point, right? I don’t want to lose sight of that. Repurposing as a box owner is key.

Fern:
Content can be repurposed four different ways. Minimum.

Jason Ackerman:
I’ll just take this podcast, for example, recording a podcast which is going to be fleshed out audio. We all should take the take the video, put it on our YouTube channel. We also take a snippet and put it on our Instagram, which also pushes to our Facebook page, which, by the way, thank you for following. Fern saw you found the best out of their Facebook page this week.

Fern:
It’s not. It’s not done very well.

Jason Ackerman:
So, you know, Facebook has gone to the Facebook pages, etc are just like you make them because you’re supposed to. But I don’t think they’re as valuable as like Instagram.

Fern:
I think for fitness, at least they’re secondary to Instagram at this point. You need to have it because Facebook owns Instagram and all the things you want to do on Instagram.

Jason Ackerman:
If you’re like happen through Facebook and Facebook. But yeah, I mean, talking about repurposing someone. You know, if if you’re a box owner, you get an email that says, hey, you know, why should I join your box? There’s three others in the area and you take the time to write back to them, repurpose them as a blog post, repurpose that as a newsletter article about, you know, why your box is so good, repurpose it as an Instagram post with a picture of your community. Don’t waste time rewriting. You know, there’s going to be some tweaks going on throughout those changes. But for the most part, in turn, touched upon it. Make sure your repurposing to save time.

Fern:
Yeah, because we all think that everybody. So some people read long form on Instagram. Some people read want to read the whole blog post. Some people want to listen to it on i-Tunes. Some people are fine have linking out from Facebook to your Web site to listen to the podcast there because they don’t care. They just want to listen to it. It doesn’t matter where they listen to it. But the point is all that. And like if you want to. You can have.

Fern:
There’s like pretty low cost platforms that will what’s the word I’m looking for that will do a transcript of a podcast?

So Nial Yeah, I guess I could do a podcast and make it into a long form article and we do that for every episode just so you guys know, listening at best hour of their day. We use a platform. It’s called Sonic’s. I forget the extension. I think it’s like a sonnet. But if you the Sonic’s and transcription, it’s like a monthly fee that we pay. But then, you know, it’s like five bucks an hour. So every episode that we record, we then transcribe because ya people may find it. We’re just as GOP words. All that stuff.

Fern:
So, yeah, the websites are definitely still. They’re definitely still a thing. Now, they’re not typically used. How most companies use them. So most companies are using a Web site and this is where the house they’re Shopify store is embedded into their Web site. And this is where they’re doing this. Its paywall protected analysis, how there’s this other joint transactions. Gyms don’t do that. Gyms are using it essentially to house content should be using it to house content, to collect data, to project your story to the world or your members story to the world. So don’t overlook the Web site because people still do look at Web sites. And again, I mean, if you’re talking about Google Analytics, you’re not going to get Google Analytics. If you don’t if you have a shitty Web site like Google, still a thing.

Jason Ackerman:
Not to mention if you want to be a Crossfit, affiliate, you by law would then have to have a Web site.

Fern:
And people are looking for gyms and people judge your Web site like whether they actually peruse through it or not. Like. It’s like long enough on a first date. You know, like first impressions are a thing. You know that I’m either a physically attractive this person immediately or not. But then I have to get into the nitty gritty, like, do I like talking to them? Like, are they funny or are they boring? Like, you know, all of those things like do they have weird tendencies? But at first, the first thing I look at is like, am I physically attracted to you like I am? It’s the same thing on a web about, oh, this is pleasant. Like, this is cool. It’s easy to navigate. Like, I found what I was looking for. Like no one is like it should be easy to navigate. It shouldn’t have a good billion tabs to get to. What are your hours potentially what programs you offer? What is it costs like? Those are the three things you want up if you want to. I’ve seen people do post their prices. I’ve seen people not post their prices and I’ve seen people who have. You have to basically submit information to get access to the pricing page. And it’s just a way to capture information.

Jason Ackerman:
That even someone as experienced as I am, I moved to Boulder and I googled Crossfit, just to see what they look like. Just to see what some options were. And yeah, you’re right. That first impression goes a long way. Some clean, simple make it easy for people to find the information they’re looking for, which, like said, is typically hours cost location and then one hundred percent a way for them to contact you and capture their information.

Fern:
But put the big thing is like you need a Web site, you need to be consistently putting content on that Web site, because there’s a whole separate discussion about how are you reaching people via like producing content, whether it’s a newsletter, whether it’s nutrition articles, whether it’s coaching articles, whether it’s movement tip videos, whether it’s a cooking video, like all of those things can be housed within your Web site. And those are all this is where you collect information as a as a business owner to figure out who are my future clients that have yet. To move to the consideration stage, right. And then I’m now potentially looking at buying your product. But if they hit your website once and then never hear from you again.

Fern:
Not not ideal. And the tough part about this is it’s a lot and this is a moving target as an affiliate owner. But you do need to be competent in it. I happen to live in this world where I’m probably don’t even phone a competent bucket anymore. I’m kind of like this guy who’s like. Basically good enough to get myself in a lot of trouble and mess things up, and then I have to call somebody and they say you get an A for effort.

Fern:
But this is a. But this isn’t a disaster, you know. So I neither one of us are by any means like Web site experts. But there are things you need. Like you must have those things. Like when I look at a gym and I look at their first impression is like, what is the home page look like? Is the first thing that somebody sees a way to contact you? If it’s not, that needs to happen to me. I’ll be the first change I would make, like the first thing on the Web site to be like, contact us goes to a landing page. Fill this out. And this goes to something that I’ve brought up in other YouTube stuff that I’ve done. This is a really easy way to solve this issue of. Somebody comes in and when you’re coaching the class, I’m coaching the 5:00 p.m. class. There’s no other coaches around. Somebody comes in, they’re interested. And then I would make the fatal flaw of saying, can you come back tomorrow without collecting any information? Nothing. They’re just like Sure. Got it. And they never come back. If I have a Web site that allows me to do this, what I can do is most people at this point have some sort of CRM that is web based and involves t.v.’s where people check in. We always have our home page tab pulled up behind Waterfind. So if this person watching I’m coaching a class, that page is literally pulled up. I walk over to the computer literally while I’m still coaching the class. I switch tabs. Hey, can you take five seconds to fill this out? They fill it out and I’ll just say I’ll call you as soon as I’m done with the class. Feel free to stick around and watch the class if you want to. But I’ve got the information I’m going to follow up with immediately. But if I have if I don’t have a website to do that, I’m not gonna be able to get that information.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. And let’s let’s end it on this. And I like your idea of having another show kind of about outrage. But one thing you just touched upon to make sure that someone listening understands is some people will show up at your box and you’re gonna be busy. Have something at your box that allows them to fill out that same form on your site. Typically, it’s an eye pad, but maybe it’s, you know, your computer open. Hey, fill this out. So I don’t forget because those are the people that are ready to join right there. They showed up at just things bare minimum. A sign in sheet. Yeah. You know, when I was coaching at North Naples and that would happen every so often and they didn’t have something like that. But I would always say, hey, what’s your name and phone number? Let me grab it for you. Like capture that information. And I used to get so mad at my coaches back in the day at Albany Crossfit, when they got I spoke to somebody that I call where information. I didn’t get it. Well, that, you know, the chances have significantly diminished of us getting them to join right now.

Fern:
We have a rule which is nobody leaves the building without getting that information. It happened about a week ago and I was I was legitimately pissed.

Jason Ackerman:
Did Caasdy to get fired.

Fern:
No, it wasn’t Cassie. But one of the other coaches. He’s been here long enough to know the things that make me angry. There is nothing that makes me angry. Or when a coach’s says, hey, this guy named Jason came by and he was interested in the gym. So cool. Where did he thought the form? They’re like. No, I just said he was gonna come back tomorrow. Thanks for nothing. Thanks for nothing. You just cost us two thousand dollars for the year.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. Or would they be like he said, he’s going to join them, like, did you collect money? No. OK. He hasn’t joined yet.

Fern:
Yeah, he’s not a member. No, I. He said he’s gonna sign up later. I’m like. Then he’s not joining.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, right. And we can have a whole podcast guess on the fact that no one cares as much as you do as a box owner. But we don’t have to die down there.

Fern:
All right. That being said, the Web site and things like this eliminate you, but you because they make it easier for people to follow the rules.

Jason Ackerman:
Yes, I agree with that. All right. There we go. Touched upon the subject of Web sites. And next week, we’ll come back. We’ll talk a little more about outreach and what you can do to get out there and get more people to find out about you. From an organic perspective.

Fern:
Also, we got another movement show coming out next week because people behind us up there like we want it. We want a movement. So if there is a movement specific you want us to cover, we got a couple lined up. Hit us up with a movement that you want us to cover and we would be happy to jam it nerd out on any of the movements with an Crossfit,.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. The two best places to hit us up are our email best out of their day at G-mail or in our DM at best hour of their day. So for Fern for Ackerman, I think that’s it for the week or I think we’re kicking off the week. This goes up on Monday. So hopefully you’ve enjoyed hopefully you’re having a great week when it goes up on some days and we’ve got some great podcasts coming. But damn right turn.

Jason Ackerman:
We’re out of here.

Fern:
See, ya..

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