153. Brian Bochette | CrossFit Thoroughbreds

153. Brian Bochette | CrossFit Thoroughbreds

Brian Bochette is the Head Coach and one of the Owners of CrossFit Thoroughbreds in Fort Myers, which opened back in 2007.  Brian started Crossfit when he was a fulltime Physical Therapist and felt insurance companies tied his hands. It’s fascinating to hear from a health care professional who found CrossFit organically and didn’t walk into basis. Brian felt so passionately about Crossfit, and it’s health benefits that he brought Crossfit Thoroughbreds as his best way to help people.  

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Time Stamps 

(2:45) Affiliate Gathering 
(3:51) Push back to HQ
(6:33) Having a Physical Therapist background and moving into Crossfit space.
(11:36) Kipping Pull-Ups
(16:49) Favourite Scaling option
(18:44) Over the last 10 years
(22:34) Good Relationship with other boxes
(23:35) Crossfit Thoroughbred moving forward
(25:15) Coaches Development

Social Media

@brianbochette
@crossfitthoroughbreds
http://crossfitthoroughbreds.com/

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Ackerman:
All right. I'm here with Brian Bochette, Brian Bush is the head coach at Crossfit, Thoroughbreds, as long as a physical therapist, but not in the typical sense of what you would think. And we're going to talk a little bit about that on today's episode. But first of all, welcome the best hour of their day, Brian.

Brian Bochette:
Thank you. And Happy to be here.

Ackerman:
I've met you recently or I should say maybe rematch you. I never know who is the first time or not, but at your level to.

Brian Bochette:
The I believe believe the first time we met was at a Thunderdome where the competitions out in Florida.

Ackerman:
That was the first time to the more recently when I saw you, you were you were taking your Crossfit, Level 2 seminar.

Brian Bochette:
No, I took my I took my level two with Jenny. I saw you most. At the Affiliate gathering.

Ackerman:
That's where it was. OK. OK. My bad. OK. So I saw you at the Affiliate gathering. That's right. You guys have been around for her for that long. And in Florida?

Brian Bochette:
Yes. Yeah. Our gym opened in 2007.

Brian Bochette:
So 2007 is at least in late 2009 is when I start as a member.

Ackerman:
Yes.

Ackerman:
That was pretty mean for her, that area of Florida. That's a that's an old box. What did you say? Like, what of the longest standing boxes in town?

Brian Bochette:
Yes. Yeah, the original. The guy who opened our box, he and his partner at the time were that were the original box. They split into two. So they were kind of two that could play claim the original. And then they actually closed and we absorbed some of them say I'd say where the original box in Fort Myers again.

Ackerman:
Yeah. I mean, and now Fort Myers. So, you know, having lived in Naples for five years and and seeing that growth there. Fort Myers is very busy with boxes, although what I have noticed in that area is some boxes have come and gone.

Brian Bochette:
Yes. So have we got a couple of boxes that I'd say are kind of putting just and we've had others that we've seen come and go.

Ackerman:
What is it about Crossfit, Thoroughbred that's kept you around for so long? So tell me. You know, elevator pitch. If someone comes up to Brian Bochette, what do you say about Crossfit, Thoroughbred to get people to want to come in?

Brian Bochette:
Honestly, I think it's the same thing that we do with Crossfit, is that not show up and show up on Monday and live it because I don't think you can capture in words. It's the same with the Crossfit, as a whole. I really am going to tell you, oh, we got the best community, the best coaching. Honestly, I think most of them do have Wonderful can use some wonderful coaching. She got to go and live it.

Ackerman:
That's what Dr. Sean Penn students we've had on the show a couple times early says. Tell me what makes your box special. But don't take community or programming. Right. And most people have or have a really hard time with that. So. Let me ask you this. Do you think about the Affilate gathering?

Brian Bochette:
I loved it. I was the opportunity to get to go.

Brian Bochette:
And I feel like we were just retrievable so well the whole week. My only complaint was that I wanted more time there.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I mean, by the time you take your typical weekend getaway, by the time you get there and wake up after travel, give a day and a half and you just want to do so much. There were so many people that we could be interacting with. I mean, like this, for example. But but somebody, you know. Oh, jeez. That you saw back in the day in the forum and all those, you know, random faces that you they bump into every few years.

Brian Bochette:
Right. That's why I told people after that I felt like every every me down, I'd sit at a different table with a different group of people. And every time I met somebody interesting, I learned something new.

Ackerman:
So let me ask you this, in this day and age in Crossfit,, there's a lot of people giving push back to, you know, whether it's HQ or Coach Glassman having been around for so long and being such a big part of the Crossfit, culture community. What are your thoughts on that? Do you think people are right in their in their stance there? Or do you think they're just being a little too entitled?

Brian Bochette:
I love what's been happening when it when I came into Crossfit, as a as a coach, I came in first as a member and I was working full time as a physical therapist at that point. When I came in as a coach, it's largely because I saw the health benefits that people were getting. And I felt like in the clinic a lot of times my hands were tied by insurance. But in the affiliate, they were giving us the tools and letting us do what we what we wanted with them. And as I always saw it, as, you know, as a health movement, and I'm glad that now there's more of a push to show that aspect of.

Ackerman:
So even back in the day when most physical therapists and chiropractors would take the stance of Crossfitters dangerous, you were at the forefront leading the leading the doctors and saying, hey, this is actually really good for you.

Brian Bochette:
Well, I would say that I was fortunate enough to not come in with a bias at the time that I started Crossfit,. I didn't know you know, I didn't know much about it. I didn't hear a lot of people talking about it. And I I just saw that there was Olympic weightlifting and gymnastics and these different elements that were interesting when I came in, I had a phenomenal experience. And then when I started telling other other PT and other health professionals, then I heard some of the oh, you do that. And I was, you know, of course, kind of surprised that there was this negative reaction because I was having such a positive experience.

Ackerman:
So so being that you're not a typical PT, meaning you you do mostly teaching's not necessarily spending a lot of time in a physical practice. What are some of the things you would encourage your. Fellow PT to recommend to their clients. And where does that fit into kind of the role of the physical therapist these days?

Brian Bochette:
As for recommended apply as far as health practices exercise,.

Ackerman:
Well, I think a lot of people would show up at their physical therapist, say they did have an injury from Crossfit, or something else. It's very uncommon for that physical therapist to turn around and say, Hey, have you looked into Crossfit,? What can we do to get physical therapists to understand that? And where would you tell them to start?

Brian Bochette:
Well, I think for the the ones that are practicing, you know, that are already out in the field, that are practicing, it comes back to if you want to work with Crossfit, Crossfit, community, you have to see what we're doing. You understand? Because a lot of it has heard opinions from people that have never set foot in the box. And you really can't have you thinking if knew step. Is that for the box? For the students that are coming up, I feel like the younger generation, there's a lot of interest. And so for myself, the students that I interact with and I try to give them as much information, as much of that clear understanding as possible. But I think we'll see a generational shift. I think that the clinicians that are out there just having a lot of haven't been exposed to it. The ones that are coming up, a lot of them are being exposed to it. But the traditional education system, it's there's not. It's not strength, conditioning is not a component that is heavily invested in in the PTA curriculum, and so that's something that, you know, personally, I would also like to see change to the PTA. Do understand.

Ackerman:
Are you known as kind of a Crossfit, PT in the area and at the school?

Brian Bochette:
Yeah, I would say I. I would be as far as at the school, I left full time clinical practice about five years ago to really focus on teaching and coaching. And so I don't really market myself as the Crossfit PT But definitely as far as education goes, the. They're within physical therapy and even within exercise science, which I teach for science students as well. There aren't a lot of people that have a good understanding of Crossfit,. So I definitely try to step up and fill that role.

Ackerman:
And when it's a physical therapist, do anything different to get them to understand that you dive a little deeper into the anatomy and the whys. Or is it the same thing? Hey, come on in and work out.

Brian Bochette:
It's largely the same thing. Just maybe couch it a little bit differently. I would say the why is a physical therapist should be able to resonate with the why pretty easily. Whether you're a PE teacher or a coach. We're all about functional movement. And so sometimes I just have to try to point out the parallels there that are pretty obvious once you take a look. There's things things that we work on. If you ask any peaty what the most important exercise in their arsenal is, you probably get back answers. Like I said, if they were all set to stand is just a squat that we do from a chair. So it's not hard to make those connections. And once people see that, we're all working towards the same goal. It's a lot easier to get that by.

Ackerman:
But what do you do? Have you had any? PTs just completely argumentative and narrow minded and not willing to even venture into the world of Crossfit,. And if so. What's your best course of action other than just ignoring them?

Brian Bochette:
Well, I haven't had a lot of that personal face to face, I think a lot of people, you know, they become keyboard warriors. I've seen more of it online than I have face to face as as one example there. I try to stay out of that kind of drama, but I saw a close up group for physical therapist somebody and posted reposted a video of somebody falling off a bar, doing kipping pull ups and made some comment about how they love when they destroy their shoulders with kipping pull ups. And that was one that, you know, that's to me was taking it too far. And so that's one where I responded and said that, you know, if you're if you're ever wishing harm on a patient, you need to step out of the profession.

Brian Bochette:
If you don't mean it, you need to reconsider your words. And if you do, you need to step out profession. And that's where I try to come from, is that we're all in it to make people happier and healthier and be able to enjoy the things that they love to do. If you don't believe that this is the best system and that's one of things I love about Crossfit, is, you know, prove us wrong. Show us a better system and we'll adopt some of those strategies and start to improve. So most people are willing to have those conversations, but you'll get some stuff from people that, you know, they're so against it that they almost you know, they almost want to see people be hurt because they want everyone to do it the way they want to do it.

Ackerman:
Well, and I like that approach. It's not just one coming from the world, but just coming from the hey be a good person world and no different. There's plenty of sports out there that physical therapists work with. You know, I'm always partial to the jujitsu world. And if somebody got caught and armbar and dislocated their elbow, Petey's shouldn't rejoice right there. They would just help them improve. So you brought up an interesting topic, though. The kipping pull-up. Let's let's talk a little bit about the kipping from the peaty world. What were your first thoughts in that?

Brian Bochette:
I think, again, because I was introduced to it in a way that was reasonable, I wasn't. Now I came into Crossfit, already having some background reconditioning and already having done years on years of strict Pull-Ups. So when the kipping pull up was introduced to me personally, I had a you know, I had a background. I felt comfortable with it. I never felt like I was being introduced to something that I couldn't control. And so I never had a negative from the start, never had a negative perceptions. I took it as if this was just this element of gymnastics as I started to hear criticism. Now I pay attention to criticism. But I also saw it because through my own personal journey that it can be done in a way that is not damaging. At least I'm 10 years old and my shoulder feels no better than they ever have.

Brian Bochette:
So my opinion is that. It's like anything. It's about dosage. It's about how you progressed to it. And I don't think anyone's having an argument against that. I don't think any.

Brian Bochette:
Coach Glassman himself would never advocate, and if you read in their loved one training manual, there's there's a problem I'm sure you're familiar with. There's a statement that 15 pull and 15 deaths. It's time to start working on the muscle. There's progressions and there's a order that's built in there. If people are applying the system incorrectly, that's not a full Crossfit,.

Ackerman:
Well, in addition to that, this these days, while teaching the pull-up at the level one, we tell people you should have five straight pull ups before even diving into this. Now, you know, you walk into Crossfit, Thoroughbred and had some good coaches. Do you feel that you would have had a bad experience that could have completely changed your perspective as a peaty?

Brian Bochette:
Yes. And I think that's unfortunate, because I think there are some people that maybe did walk into a box and not have a very experienced the beginning and walked out thinking that that is what Crossfit, is. And they'll walk away and probably most of them will give it a second chance and they'll continue in that perception.

Ackerman:
Well, let's spend a little more time on the campaign pull. As a physical therapist. What's you what would be your prescription? When should someone start developing? Kevin, pull a visit. Hey, day one, let's work on this gymnastics kid. Or is it? Come back to me when you have, you know, 20 strict pull ups.

Brian Bochette:
I don't think it needs to be 20 and I don't think there's a magic number, but I would generally like people to have at least five straight pull ups. Many times I'll have people start working on just the rhythm of the clip before we ever worry about the actually implementing the pull up bar. So they're developing their strict belief at the same time, the developing you're giving rhythm that we might even do in warm ups and things like that. And I think that's totally appropriate. I think there's a there's a lot of wiggle room there where as a coach, you have to use your professional judgment. And, you know, some of those lighter weight people will have a lot more wiggle room than some of the heavier people do, have less mechanical stress on my shoulders. Professional judgment plays in. But that that five strip clubs is a very reasonable goal set people.

Ackerman:
So let me take your head off and throw on your coaching hat. You got athletes in your class and they can do kipping Pull-Ups, but they don't have five strict Pull-Ups. How do you handle that?

Brian Bochette:
That's a tough conversation. A lot of the way that I handle that is I program a lot of pull ups. So we get lots of opportunities to work on it so that I try to avoid on the front end, try to avoid that because we're working so much, develop that straight string. And to have that understanding that that's for strength is value. I'm always happy. And I'm I'm in no way against Kipping, but I'm always happy when I see strict movements show up in competition because I believe that just gives people some incentive to train those things. So as a coach, I'm always pushing people and I see other coaches doing the same or from the athlete perspective, they want to go to the competition movements. I'm always happy to see that and I personally I'll offer that frequently the programming to push people to work on that just platform strewing.

Ackerman:
So you're doing your own programming, you put in strict Pull-Ups. Is that something that you've always done or have you taken more recently a stance there and saying we need that? And if so, was that hit with any pushback from your members that wanted to go with Butterfly or Kipping Pulls?

Brian Bochette:
Now, I think that's something that I've always done. The prior to Crossfit,, like I said, I was working out. I had I did undergrad, my undergrad human performance. So I studied exercise, but I had never done any kipping anything prior Crossfitters I did. I had lots of strict work behind me then and I always saw value in that. So triple ups have always been something I feel like they've they've never gone away from me. Kipping is just added another option and other later today.

Ackerman:
What's your favorite scaling Pull up's?

Brian Bochette:
I would say the toe assisted, so the toes, the set of toenail, the one that they teach, I believe they're still teaching this way as a Crossfit, gymnastic seminar. Prior to that, we used to do a lot more bands and I really pushed everyone. I took away bands basically entirely. It was not letting anyone use bands for pull ups because I just saw that they were developing this dependence on the bands and this weakness at the lower end. So the initiation, the pull up, the relatively weak and that and got really people into those toenail pushed out pull ups and I felt like that helped a lot. Now I will use a variety. So we use Ringrose, we use the fill now fill up. We use bands depending on the, you know, the intended stimulus of that workout. But that's still probably my go to. And then if it's something where we have the luxury of time and people partner assist that, I'm a fan of as well.

Ackerman:
When you say partners assisted, is the old school body building, bend your knees, grab your feet.

Brian Bochette:
Yes.

Ackerman:
You know, I still love those, you know, right now getting a lot of strict pull ups, especially with the muscle Abenaki programming. And I love when I've got a partner. And you could just spot them because you can really squeeze. You can tell that using the right musculature and the right stability muscles and the shoulders and the back. So great scaling options. And I think at the class level, it's just great to build that camaraderie and almost have that little bro sash going on in the in the box.

Brian Bochette:
Yeah, absolutely. That's that's something that if you can capture those moments when people feel like they're getting that those bro moments.

Ackerman:
What's what's one thing? In the last 10 years of Crossfit, day, you've really enjoyed that. You look forward tomorrow. And what's one thing that you haven't loved?

Brian Bochette:
See, as far as enjoyed the whole Crossfit, health movement, what I see would be the biggest thing that. That to me has been exciting because it's sort of bringing together the two worlds and it's exposing that there are a lot of other people who feel the way that I feel. Know, I always I mean, I know as you that I was not the only one, but I'm seeing more and more Petey's and physicians and other people within the medical world that are saying, hey, we buy this, we understand what this is for and we want to be a part of making this great. That's been that's the thing that has really gotten me even more fired up about Crossfit,.

Brian Bochette:
So having a bit of the affiliate gathering, watching Coach Raspiness presentation and, you know, seeing that there is pushback from the majority in the Crossfit, world that say although maybe it's shrinking now. What would you tell them is so great about the push for Crossfit, health?

Brian Bochette:
I think that I will butcher if I tried to give the exact quote, but. Coach Glassman said something along the lines of the media, a fault of character to look at the games and look at reversal of diabetes and think that the games is more important. So as fun, as wonderful and as great as it is that I think when people can put those two things in perspective and just stack that, you know, athletic competition versus potentially saving a life. That to me is that should be reason enough to buy.

Ackerman:
Have you had any members at your box lose 100 pounds?

Ackerman:
I don't know that we broke the one hundred pound. We had some pretty high numbers and that's something that I think I'm hoping with the Crossfit, Health Initiative that we'll see more of that because there'll be more willingness for those people to step into the box.

Ackerman:
Yeah. Right. I mean, I think, you know, from the affiliate level and a box owner level, this push for Crossfit, health is amazing. You know, I've said it for years that the competition at the affiliate level is now with other boxes, but it's what these other gyms and global gyms and all these boutique gyms that are opening up and showing the world that being forty five in orange theory, they're not showing 400 and 500 pound people coming in and losing weight like Crossfitters Crossfit, is showing the world that, hey, this is for anybody. And if you do this, you can really change your life coach, classman and believe he said, you know, most boxes. At some point in the near future, we'll have someone that has lost 100 pounds. So that's one thing. Go ahead.

Brian Bochette:
I'm sorry to say. On that note that I always when it comes to competition, always my perspective is 100 percent that my competition is not the box down road. You know, most of the other box winners in the area. Coaches, the era, they're all friends of mine or we're all working for the same goal. 100 percent agree there. I would even take it so far to say that, you know, my competition is also not the the forty five or the orange theory or if they're genuine, any of those facilities that are genuinely trying to get people in. If you were selling people false promises or you're banking on selling memberships and the people not showing up, then your competition in the sense that you're working against my goal, my goal is to get people theatre and healthier.

Brian Bochette:
The people that are working against that or people that are not know not trying to get people into the gym or the ones they're trying to get them to do unhealthy behavior. So that's you know, I'm all for the kickback against big soda and those things, because to me, that's our competition. Our goal is to make people healthy. That's who's working against us.

Ackerman:
So you've mentioned having a good relationship with other boxers. And there's like we discussed earlier, quite a few great boxes out there in the Fort Myers area. Do you guys ever get together, talk about best practices, talk about, you know, doing some things together as a way to promote the community?

Brian Bochette:
Yes, some. It's something I would certainly like to do more of. There is some, you know, some of that going on. And as an educator, I've brought my students into a few different boxes in the area when I could make it fit with the learning objectives that we have for the class. I bring them in to show what other coaches who I respect in the area are doing. And the side benefit is, I guess I get to work on them as well.

Ackerman:
What are some things that Crossfit, Thoroughbred is currently doing and will get a lot of box owners listening? It's 20 20 now. What are some things you're doing now to prepare yourself for a successful, you know, not just your decade, etc., but also in the next 10 years at the box?

Brian Bochette:
Well, for one know, I function there as head coach, and I kind of fell into that role being just the one that had the most credentials when we changed ownership. You know, some years back I was the one with those credentials. I kind of fell into that role and I love it. I love coaching, I love programming. I love being there for our community. But I personally, I've been doing a lot of my own homework, including listening to your podcast.

Ackerman:
Thank you very much.

Brian Bochette:
But to be a to step up and be not just that better, in the previous years, I was focused on how I'd be a better coach. Now I feel like I'm just just now learning how how do I be a better head coach, really? How do I help all my other coaches be better coaches to use that? That's what I'm personally taking some responsibility for, 2020 and beyond.

Ackerman:
I want. What are some things know whether or not you learned from the podcast. But, you know, we get a lot of coaches listening and a lot of head coaches listening. And, you know, Fern and I discuss one of the biggest issues in the Crossfit, coaching spaces. There isn't a whole lot of development. You know, people take their level 1 for 90 percent of. Crossfit, Trainor's that's the furthest they get a handful come back to their level 2, and in between there's minimal development. What are you doing? And tangible stuff that the listeners can maybe of lemaire their box.

Brian Bochette:
Well, one of the things that we've just recently done is just asking my my other coaches to create goals for 2020. We know we have our members all creating goals and we all have our own personal fitness goals. I've always kind of had in the back of my mind, I have goals for this, the course I want to take on this. But I this is the first year personally that I have written down my coaching goals and asked our other coaches to do the same. I was treated the same way. If we're asking our members to go through this process, develop their fitness, that we're going through the same process, develop ourselves as professional coaches.

Ackerman:
So starting off with goals and do you mind sharing if you have them in front of you or remember any of you? Do you have any goals from some of your coaches? It be just good to hear kind of what the typical coach thinks of when it comes to development?

Brian Bochette:
I don't have it right in front of me, but I'll share the ones that come to mind. And one of the first ones that just pops to mind. And the reason this does is because it's the simplest. One of our coaches was respond. She's a coach who works another full time job. So she's coaching certain hours and she doesn't get as many opportunities to learn. So that was coming. It's exactly what I want to hear. But coming from her is just step up my game when it comes to learning other people's names, learning their backstories, all of that, because she's already she's like me. She's spent a lot of time developing herself as a coach, taking courses, things like that. And. I know, I know in listening to your podcasts, I keep hearing from the best coaches in the world say the same. It's back to the simple things fact if no people's name know their story keeps the bathroom clean, which is the simplest things. So that's I think sometimes the for the experienced coaches. What? We need what we need to do is set the goals of go back and revisit the fundamentals, know just like go back, going back and practicing your squad. Well, you know, the Escalades coaching is things like knowing names.

Ackerman:
And what do you do for them, what do you tell them to do other than direct them to our podcasts where we talk about how to learn names?

Brian Bochette:
Mean, what do we do as far as learning names?

Ackerman:
What are some what are some drills you might implement there?

Brian Bochette:
So we have a student intern who he's a one time I actually see you exercise science students who's interning with us. And so he's these brand new. And his goal, you know, his week one a week, two goals have been learning names. And for him, because he's brand new right up. I'm just quizzing them. I just periodically and I won't worry. I'm I'll just say, hey, what were the names that people in the four o'clock class? And he's pretty good at rattling them off. His goal now is to start using them. And this is the other goal for all the coaches would be to use names at least three times. So bare minimum that people get greeted. You get a goodbye and you give them one actually minimal one actionable cue using their names throughout the class. Not sure if that was one that was on a Ben Bergeron policy or where, whereas I picked that up from someone else anyhow. But that bare minimum of touch point at the beginning. The end somewhere in the middle.

Ackerman:
Yeah, absolutely. Fern and I talk about it a lot, but you should be using, you know, an athlete's name or a member's name, you know, at least once in every evolution of clasping the light or read the warm, etc. And a great challenge for for the listeners to to give them the next time they are coaching award and then try to use everybody's name multiple times. Well, Brian, as far as Crossfit, Thoroughbred, you kind of talk to us about what's coming next. You talk to us about coaching. What about the physical therapy world? What are some things you're excited about, especially as it relates to the Crossfit, space?

Brian Bochette:
Well, I'm excited to hopefully see the education on Crossfit, and on strength and conditioning in general grow physical therapy programs as far as education goes, are very, very standardized. There's a organization called Kapiti that is responsible for making sure we meet all the criteria. And so that's a very standardized process. And we really it's one of those situations where you kind of have to teach to the test. The licensing exam, as it peaty will have a lot of content on it. But content is not going to relate specifically to Crossfit, or strength conditioning. So that makes it a slow process to change. We always have to be preparing students for that test. We don't have a lot of room to insert a lot of other information. But I'll be teaching the therapeutic exercise courses for a PTA program starting this year and I've planted some seeds. I would love to get some strength and conditioning in the local doctor physical therapy program that I'm involved with. But there are other people around the country and around the world making for that push as well to teach Petey's more and not to make PTs strength coaches, but to teach a little bit more of an understanding of strength and conditioning that would allow them to communicate better with coaches. So that's one of my goals for the profession, for the education side, is to get more of that clear line of communication there.

Ackerman:
Well, that's really great to hear how many CEUs you use and how often do you guys need to recertify in the beauty world?

Brian Bochette:
It's due every two years, and I would have to look to tell you the number of use that as an educator, I feel kind of obligated to always be staying on top of things. So I've never had an issue of needing to get some use of the N. I look oftentimes for things that I can use for if I can use something for my PTA and for my Crossfit, level 3. I live in pretty good about accepting some of the things that I've submitted that have been dual purpose. But I think they're taking a lot of use. I've never run into do I even really need to count the numbers 'cause I'm usually over before we get there. But it's it's every two years from the same.

Ackerman:
We have to recertify our level for credential every three years and then they have doubled the CS that they actually need. Do they accept the Crossfit, level 1 course?

Brian Bochette:
Not that I don't believe so I didn't try to say when I took my loved one, I did not try to submit it for BTC use. I don't think so. There are some courses in the in the space and there's there's no more developing all the time that are like functional fitness related courses, but specific for Petey's. And there they've got a curriculum that's designed for Petey's as far as a level one. I don't believe so.

Ackerman:
Well, hopefully one day that will change. But anyway, Brian, it's been great chatting with you. Is there anything that we missed that you wanted to talk about before we we hop off and tell the people where they can find you and check out Crossfit, thoroughbred of mind?

Brian Bochette:
I don't think there's anything we need to another rally to go down now. I'd be happy to chat in time in the future, because there's a lot to unpack between the what's going on with health care and what's going on with education, all that.

Ackerman:
I'll let you take that conversation with Fern. Fern is the brains behind this operation. And hopefully you'll realize that when you watch our episodes and as you saw, we we had our first episode of Dropping In go on YouTube yesterday so you can check that out. And we've discussed maybe doing our next season in the Florida area so we can always swing by Crossfit, Thoroughbred, but we will check you out.

Brian Bochette:
Facebook and Instagram both just under my name, Brian BUSHWAY, the Gym Instagram, Jim Facebook, Jim Webb, Situs Crossfit,, they're Razzak of any of those resources.

Ackerman:
Well, it's been great chat. And we will have you back on, we really enjoy having these health care professionals, be it. You know, M.D. Petey's chiropractors, we just like hearing from the medical world and showing the community that the direction Crossfit, is going is really going to benefit them and make the world a better place. Thanks for being on. Thanks for all you do. And we appreciate your time.

Brian Bochette:
Absolutely. Thank you. Happy to be here.

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