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158. Do Less Better

158. Do Less Better

Doing less better is something that is brought up quite a lot in the Crossfit space. When being a Coach in any field, not just Crossfit if you don’t give yourself time to actually coach in class. Everything will be moving too quickly to allow you to actually help your members. Fern and Ackerman discuss the effect this has on your coaching ability and your athletes. 

Timestamp

(2:45) What separates gyms?
(8:27) Level Two Changes
(14:56) Coaching for fun vs professional

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Fern:
What is one of the biggest? Issues that people bring up to you in both the level one and the level two setting.

Ackerman:
First of all, I like how, almost every one of our podcasts begins with one of us asking the other question, but then not getting an answer in return because we ultimately make fun of the other person.

Ackerman:
I feel like I've typically.

Fern:
I like I feel like I answer your questions. Did I not answer your question in the last podcast?

Ackerman:
I don't remember. But usually becomes after some banter from you. And then you get to the answer. So what is the biggest complaint at the level 1 and level 2 that so many.

Fern:
That people are like for us, so not what the course like?I mean, I really get any.

Ackerman:
No. Yeah. I didn't mean that. But the frustration that they're expressing is typically that they're not getting coached.

Fern:
Yeah, I would agree that's probably one of the that's probably one of them, maybe one or two or three biggest kind of. It's not a complaint. It's really not even the right way to say it.

Ackerman:
No, it's more realization.

Fern:
OK. That's a perfect way to explain. I did a poor job of teaching that.

Ackerman:
So like everything, I pick you up. I got carried you.

Fern:
Thank you.

Ackerman:
Gave you The words.

Fern:
Thank you for finally doing something in this relationship . Yeah. So I would say it's probably that. And then the other one is that particularly in the programming, in the love, the one in the lesson plan and level 2, where people have this light bulb moment about what is required to actually coach in a 60 minute timeframe. And Paul Trombley brought this up in our interop and my pursuit with him, because I ask him said, what do you think is the number one thing coaches could do more in their classes and use like coach? So then the question becomes, how do I do that?

Ackerman:
Yeah, I think one of the most common things I've heard over the years is, man, my coaches never told me that. Why is it me? I've been doing it wrong. You know, those types of things are saying. I just told you to push your knees out a little bit like it wasn't a big deal. But no one's ever said that. Yeah. So that's why we're here. We get we just got a message on our Instagram at best hour of their day. You know, I wouldn't have done as well at the level two if I had not been in your mentor course or listening to your podcast has made me a better coach. That's ultimately why we started this is to help people coach better because I mean, we don't need to beat a dead horse at this point, but that's what separates box to box.

Fern:
I think it's probable.It's not currently, but I think that will be if gyms continue to get better and start to understand the value. So I think currently what separates most gyms is.And we saw this at the on the box or what separates? I think, you know, below versus above average gems is not necessarily the coaching. It's actually the group management and their organizational skills. They're either unorganized or they have some sort of, you know, rhyme or reason for how they do things. But then what I think separates above average gyms from great gyms is they also have coaching on top of that. But then. But then it does it does bring up the question when those people ask that when people have that realization, my coaches never told me that. Then I start to think to myself why we know that knees out is not a new cue. Everybody knows that we want the Knees tracking over the toe. That's not a revelation.For anybody at this point.So then the question is why has nobody told them? Is it willful ignorance? Is it?

Fern:
You know, I you know, I think I have an idea of what it is.

Ackerman:
But as you're saying that here's what kind of came to my mind. Most coaches are newer and most coaches aren't getting developed. So what's happening is, you know, they're not. It's not that they can't see movement something. They can't correct movement. But it's like, hey, I'm not great at this yet. I just took my level one. I really don't. Or maybe even coaching for a year. And I'm trying to coach movement. But you're making me do it really fast. And it's like anything else. Like it's what the the newer you are, the slower you should go. No different than developing your snatch. OK, let's get TVC. Let's just move from first. Pull the second. Pull the third pull. So. All right. The group is squatting, but you have three minutes to correct 20 people because you have to go from part A to B to C to D versus now you have 20 minutes simply to work on these three movements. You know, we're doing Cindy pull ups, push ups in the air squat. You get to even prioritize in minutes when most of my time on air squats. Now you have 20 minutes just to work on that. It's like, you know, trying to pick up an instrument you've not played in and played at the tempo that the song is meant to versus slowing it down.

Fern:
No, I agree. So I taught a level two at Crossfit, mayhem this weekend.

Ackerman:
And any any fun stories with Chuck and Lindsey.

Fern:
Here's one. So we went to seniors. We went to Seniors House afterwards.

Ackerman:
As a friend, fill everybody and that's.

Ackerman:
So, yeah. So so. Rich Froning, senior, so not the fittest one of the fittest people on earth, his dad. So it's not uncommon that we go to seniors house after a seminar. So we go over there. We hang out, shoot the shit he cooks for us and we just kind of a good time. But he's got in his basement back there and some we've seen videos. It's the it's his place is the one with the big kind of pond in the back. But we're down there and he has a pool table down there. And Lindsay has been giving him crap about like make sure the pool tables ready so the pool tables ready. And so Chuck and Lindsay play first. And just for the record, Lindsay's terrible Lindsay Andrew. One of my favorite people. She's a phenomenal coach, but she's garbage up pool.

Ackerman:
You can check it out on your Instagram or maybe her Instagram. I know. I saw. I think she posted it.

Fern:
But what senior posted it first anyway. So they play and then she and I play.And and the the punchline is this. Lindsay wins both games. However, and I posted this on Zina's thing, she did not beat us. We both scratched on the eight ball. He's scratched.So she had a pretty big comeback on him. He was, you know, I want to say like six or seven balls in front. And then she had a comeback. She still had like six balls on the table when I scratched on the ball. So she won, but she did not beat me. I beat myself because that's the way the game works.

Ackerman:
So it follows one of those weird. It's a sport. Right. Do you agree that it's a sport as it is?

Fern:
Yeah. People compete and they went money and stuff. And there was an opponent. So, yeah, the strategy involved.

Ackerman:
Looking at the whole debate, I.

Fern:
It's it's not all of it. It's a game. I had a game where it's.

Ackerman:
A game and a conversation with Zach Forest play two or three years ago where we were kind of creating

Fern:
I though you said Zack Morris.

Ackerman:
Oh, yeah, him too. Actually, they're rebooting Saved by the Bell,.

Fern:
Which they should screech. Gonna be screech.That's the only thing I want to know.

Ackerman:
I don't know that Screech is getting the light back,.

Fern:
But Slater still looks like Azeez later, by the way.

Ackerman:
He looks phenomenal, but I don't think. Yeah, I think Screech was in a few too many porn to get the invite back. Zillah, NBC. But so there we were having this conversation of what games, sport and competition. And really, you can sense a lump. You know, because there's always a debate, what's golf? What's chess? What's videogaming to divide it up in the games for the competition? But nevertheless, I don't remember how he got. Oh, you're talking about your level to man.

Fern:
So we'll circle back real quick. Thanks for that detour. The so. So during one of the breakouts, you know, we do these different drills. And typically the first drill is like a teaching slashing drill. And if you haven't taken your level two and we can talk about we can pitch the level to at this point because everybody should be taking a middle level to you since they changed the format. So stop retaking your level one and go take your level two.

Ackerman:
Do you like the new format of the level, too?

Fern:
Well, I like the format of the level, too. I do like the changes within the course. But I like the level to change in format for this purpose more than anything else. The test is no longer on site. So people come and they don't have the stress of the test. So I think they retain more and they pay attention to what's going on because that is the actual value of the level two course, which is that feedback for you to take that information and go back to your box on Monday and actually be able to implement that. But I think far too many people are stressed and worried about the test and they block out all the things in that course that actually have value, which is and.

Ackerman:
There's just more opportunity for us to lecture and at breakout groups your grade.I mean, it's the best course, in my opinion, for just Hands-On experience.

Fern:
So it's kind of like recap here. The when you said, you know, people you don't think that they necessarily can't see. I actually don't disagree with you. There are some people that just literally don't know what they're looking at and cannot see movement. I think there's a bigger pool of people who fall in the bucket of like you described. It's too fast for them. And they don't know where to look and when. So we do these breakout groups and this is seeing drill. And we just kind of follow the coach around and they're supposed to identify things that they see with regard to faults. And typically, nobody sees anything. They just walk around and they're kind of looking around aimlessly. And then I'll pause them and I'll say for the next five to six reps, I don't want you to look at anything other than the feet and then just tell me what you see. And all the sudden, you know, they all they go typically almost 80 to 100 percent as far as identifying faults on each athlete. They'll say, oh, well, that stance is too narrow. The heels are up. They're turning their toes out too wide. So I agree with you. But what we've done is what you just described is we've slowed down what they were doing and we gave it intention. So look here first. Don't look at anything else. Now, how this is relevant to why nobody told somebody that their knees were caving in is probably because all of that is happening too fast. I have multiple parts in the workout. I don't have time to watch somebody do 15 to 20 air squats in a class of 15 to 20 people. As we get warmed up for the overhead squat like so today at our gym, you know, we're doing best. Our programming is overhead squat. And then.

Ackerman:
What's the best out of programming? Tell me more

Fern:
What everybody should be doing, right. So in that in the lesson plan, it's built out for watching people and coaching them through the air squat through a banded overhead squat.

Fern:
Like I stole that from twelve states and that's in the dropping in series as well. And then going to a PDC fight before we get into the barbell. And I can start to identify all those things because I'm not worried about getting a mat card in there. So the the real thing here is like because people are not skilled enough to see movement very quickly, be able to identify it. If we're going to coach, well, we have to do less and we have to do it better.

Ackerman:
Yeah, and I think that, you know, really.And they want to beat a dead horse, as we've said, you know, this comes back to.

Fern:
I don't know if it's beating a dead horse because we cannot talk about this enough because it is what we're supposed to be doing.

Ackerman:
And I. And it's not happening now.

Fern:
I mean, the at large. Right. Crossfit, coaches in-boxes, you know, like how? Like how? That's no different than saying, well we I mean we say NI's out too much. Well I'm not saying it needs out too much of everybody's knees and I'm gonna keep saying until my mouth falls off.

Ackerman:
No, no, no. But that's what I was going to say. It's like I don't want to beat a dead horse, but that voice needs to be beat.

Fern:
Correct.

Ackerman:
It's because it continues. But I will say and I don't want to take 100 percent of the credit, but I think we should claim most of it. I m.c. I am seeing a shift in the paradigm when we show up at level ones and then let's it is. Do you agree with that?

Fern:
I do. But now the struggle becomes. Now people realize it. So they have this moment of clarity that I cannot coach well with three parts to a workout. It is just almost mathematically impossible to do it well. But then the stressor becomes they don't have control at the box. So I had multiple people bring this up at the at the seminar. And their concern or now their dilemma is, OK, I understand.

Fern:
And I buy in to the idea that, OK, in order to coach, we have to we have to do less, we have to do it better and we have to do this lesson plan properly like we teach at the level one, level two. But I don't write the programming in the coach or owner is not going to change it.\Now.

Ackerman:
There's that. And then I think there's also the like, well, what do I do? And you don't want to get that revolt from your members. But you're only going to get that if you're not giving them something to make up for less workouts.

Fern:
Correct. Right. So there is all there is this this false idea that if I just take that, I don't replace it with anything. You're gonna replace it with lots of coaching preferrably like you're going to replace it with improving people's air squad to improving their Pull-Ups or going through more skills and drills to build up those capacity or movement or positions. But that's the struggle is because people have not been doing that.

Fern:
They're not really sure what to do because that takes practice. If you're going to run a ten to fifteen minute squat group to practice that, otherwise you're gonna be stuck just like we see on a very regular basis to give somebody five minutes to teach their squat. And they're done it too, because they don't know what to do. There's no plan because they never had to make a plan because there was never enough time to have to worry about it anyway.

Ackerman:
What do you think part of it is just because most coaches are just doing it for fun versus trying to be professionals.

Fern:
Maybe. But I. But I tend to disagree with that, because even if they are doing it for fun, I don't I don't know any Crossfit, or that doesn't want to be better at it.

Fern:
What coaching or at that fitness in general? I mean, really, it's kind of it's one of the most greedy communities with regard to knowledge. I've ever been around. So I don't think it's that at all. There's probably a you know, there's turds in every community. Right. So there's definitely some people who don't care and then they're just there to work out and to be Instagrammed famous. But I think the vast majority and this is virtually everybody that comes to a level 1 and 2 course that I've ever interacted with. They want to be better. They're just not really sure how because we can.

Fern:
The level one is one of the best courses in the world with regard to entry and then level too, I think is honestly the best course for developing coaches. But there's there's a lot in the middle that needs to happen there. And people are, in my opinion, starved for that information. So I don't think it's that people don't care. I think it's they know they want to be better, but they just are not really sure how until they show up to level 2. And they're like, oh, I get it.

Ackerman:
Ok, so let's let's bring it around. You know, we we've done a whole strength net con episode where we talk about it and again, we're not telling you you can never do that, but we're telling you you need to coach law. So what are we telling people in this episode?

Fern:
If you can see or challenge yourself, whoever is writing the programming, whether you purchase it or you can just get some free days off of best hours, like just to look at the programming.And the lesson plans.

Ackerman:
So, by the way, when you say that we're on modify, we're soon to be on Wi-Fi and sugar wad. By February 10th, we'll be on both.

Fern:
By February 10th, we'll be on both. And so we can get some free days in there just to kind of check it out and go in again.

Fern:
Because of what you and I do and because of the interaction that we have with athlete owners and coaches, we're intimately aware with what people are, what coaches want and what they need, which is they need to understand the art and the skill of coaching more and that gets pushed to the side. If we're just putting more things in the hour and again, we're not bashing. Strength was on. We had a strength was MacDonough Crossfit,. Right. And we are the ones that kind of. Right. That's our programming this past weekend. However, our Saturday classes are 90 minutes.

Ackerman:
So that will really run a purposely like schedule that in that calendar, it's 90 minutes on the schedule because.

Fern:
Typically the classes are considerably larger.And that started that trend started years ago. So it's a Saturday. I'm not running three back to back classes.

Ackerman:
That's a cool concept. And I didn't realize you did that. I think that's something. If I if I had a box, I'd consider less stress. You're right. Saturdays can have 40 people at times. And rather than giving them a watered down, you know, 30 minutes of lunges, air squats and pushups. We need a little more time. Maybe you can. Even half the group this strength, first half does met lots of options with that, Aaron. Half. Yeah.

Fern:
The world is your oyster. The.But what the reason we do it is because typically we want to put in some longer durations like a hero workout or potentially a strength plus a maricon and not be so concerned with this 60 minute, 60 minute interval where we can get in there, have fun and I have more people to manage. And we all know that if you run enough classes, that lesson plan starts to expand as the number of athletes grows because it's just harder to manage people and get them there in a timely fashion. So we're not against that. It's just like you have to be able to do it well and you need more time to do that well.

Ackerman:
So that's you know, spending isn't.

Fern:
Always done what's all right now said 90 minutes on Saturdays.Not always, but I mean, we've been doing it for literally years at this point. I don't remember when we switched it, but it's been we running 8 a.m. and a 9:30 and we we've. I've even toyed around with like as the numbers grow and they're potentially backing down from an hour and a half to an hour and fifteen and then throwing a third class in there. But for sure, I think it needs to be longer than an hour because people hang out on Saturdays, all that stuff.

Fern:
So there's a lot that goes into that. But anyway, the I think what people should do is consider like taking some things out of the hour and replacing it with coaching.

Fern:
And.I'm here to fill you in or let you in on a little secret. It's probably not going to go well at first, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't try it.

Ackerman:
Yes, like sex. I'm still not good at it.

Fern:
That does not shock me.

Ackerman:
Once in like 20 something years later.

Fern:
Are you practicing enough? I mean, define enough. Let me get roz his podcast.

Ackerman:
He practically himself,.

Fern:
Probably more than I should. Maybe I'm overtraining with your overtrained.

Ackerman:
You're not. You're not. You're not. You're not under recovering your overtraining.

Fern:
I think he would think we brushed over, by the way, as best. Our programming is one of the few programming that's on multiple platforms,.

Fern:
Correct? Yes. So we are gonna be on both of those. And if you're not on one of those, we can still deliver the programming to you.

Fern:
So it's not like you have to be on one of those. It's just gonna be a little bit less time consuming if you are on those platforms platforms because it'll auto populate to your gym and you want to do anything with the full lesson plans for your coaches to see and have access to. And they're designed for the coaches. So they're not necessarily designed for the with the they are you know, we write the programming with the athletes in mind, but we write the programming with with the coach in mind because it's it's there the person that is really there to try to change lives, you know, seeing direct movement, make it the best hours of people's day. So we want to set them up for success. And that's what we do when we write them. And I'm and I'm probably not going to write anything that cannot be done. So I'm not going to write. Typically in a typical lesson plan and I've been doing this for a while, I'm gonna maybe have a little bit of overage by about 10 percent of something that I may want to try and that I may get in there or I may not, but like 10 percent at most within the lesson plan. And that's just gives me a little bit of wiggle room. So yesterday, for instance, I think I had eighteen in the 5:00 p.m. and then I had.10:00 in the 6:00 p.m., I think.

Fern:
And that was something I had to take out of the 5:00 p.m. because there are just too many people just taking me a little bit longer to get through it. But then I added it back in for the 5 p.m. and it wasn't anything significant. Just different parts of the general warm because that's typically where people go along. So. So, yeah, I think that's that's really kind of where we're recommending people go, which is don't do so much. You're not taking away. You're actually going to be giving more take notes.

Ackerman:
Well, so the challenge becomes let's. Let's challenge people to try that and let you know, here's the deal. We have our own programming. Certainly we would love, if you check it out, whether it's the free trial or, you know, go in and purchase it and and use it at your box. But whether you do or not. The challenge becomes, can you start to implement maybe one day a week, maybe two, maybe three where you're doing one workout. And that's how you're gonna get better coaching. Because let me tell you this also, you know, this showing up at a level to nothing is more embarrassing than watching someone else get embarrassed by their coaching skill. It's awkward. It's like a it's like a train wreck.

Fern:
And everybody I mean.Yeah, it's definitely tough. It's tough.

Ackerman:
How do you when you get someone you're running your group circles as a Sunday. So Sunday's the participants come in a group coach in five to seven hours, a group gertten five to seven people. You're moving for that entire time except for the one time you're coaching. How do you bring the participants back in after a really bad coaching?It just happened.

Fern:
I don't find it to be an issue because everybody's got their moment where, you know, they get egg on their face. So like, nobody's immune to it. I have I have yet to coach a group in however long I've been doing this where somebody was just a 1000 percent rockstar and and they had no feedback that they could not improve on. So I don't I don't think it's actually.

Fern:
I think I think everybody knows their time is coming and I think it builds in this layer of empathy where I like people just. Are not. They're not going to judge people because they know they're on the chopping block.

Fern:
They're up next. So all they're really thinking about is like, well, I'm not going to do that. I'm just gonna make sure I try to do this and I'm going to try to to to try to run through the progressions in time. So I don't I don't find it to be that big of a deal. And if I mean, you know, like it is, it is, in fact, a judgment free zone, because we know we know it's not their home gym. We know they're gonna say a cue that they literally never used in their life before. And then they're gonna be telling themselves. God, I'm so stupid. Why I see that. I'm like, listen, it happens, man. Like, you're nervous. Like, you don't know these people. I'm over here making you nervous simply by sitting here and watching you. So it is what it is like. Let's mess up, you know, chuck cars. Well, he's like, let's make a different mistake tomorrow. Like, that's his big thing. You're gonna make mistakes. Make a different one tomorrow. Don't make the same one.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I agree with that. And you know, like you said, everyone kind of comes in from their own box. It's hard to get this pressure out there. But there are there's always one participant where the rest of the people are just like looking around like, wow. And I think it's eye opening to them in a way, too, because it's like one, I'm probably just as bad. And they. For we know now it's shelling them and this is kind of what you're like, you know. And secondly, you're right. No one ever comes through. I'm like, hey, we have no feedback for you, just like we always have feedback for each other.

Fern:
But the point is that feedback I got feedback from Chuck this weekend on two things. You know, this was like to clean this up, trying to move this over here a little bit. So I think it's more about what it what what what was the take away is like, OK, you messed it up. So what? Who cares? You're gonna mess it up. I mean, that does the same thing with lesson plan. I know zero coaches who have not gone over on a lesson plan. I think that's that's not even dolorous. You know, that's that's not what's important. I think. Think James Hobart was the one who dinged me on this years ago, which is he said, listen, you're gonna go over like I'm not mad about like going over on a lesson plan or something like that. He's like a mad if you don't know why that's a problem.

Ackerman:
That's a great point. And that really we've we've said this numerous times on the show as well. Words like get that feedback, learn from your mistakes and understand how you can get better. But you can only do that if you if you're coaching. So, again, we're not trying to beat this dead horse, but that's the challenge. Right. And if you're listening to this, whether you're a coach, a member or a box owner, we challenge people and work out and they'll go with them. Thirty to forty five minutes. Don't go choosing Murph or another hero workout.

Fern:
I would challenge somebody to choose for sure. Sub 10. And if you really want to challenge yourself, choose something that's really fast like a friend or tip more. Most people will be done in under eight minutes of scaled correctly. And then what do you do with the other 52 minutes of your class.

Ackerman:
And then see the response your members get? Because if you do this right, you're gonna get that look like this is all we're doing today. But when they get coaching from me, they're going to start to change their tune. And then when they just demolish the workout because they're moving better. Que. You gave them helps and because you worked on the thruster, you you see better during that workout and you're not worrying about ten other movements and then moving people around. It's gonna be a great experience.

Fern:
Yeah. So I think I think the challenges is to try to figure out different ways to do less better. And if and if you don't have that ability. Meaning the boxer or whatever we're still doing parts A through Z will get twenty seven pieces to the 60 minute workout session that we got.All of them are two minutes apiece. Then what I would tell you is like you have control of something in there. Like only where about where you can control. Like you can't control that there's multiple pieces in there. You know, just master the whiteboard brief. Go back. Listen to the whiteboard episode on the whiteboard read episode. Master the general warm up like just spent like knock six to seven, maybe ten minutes, knock it out of the park and just worry about that because you can't do anything about the rest of it. So and it's probably the only thing that you're gonna be able to manage in that time frame anyway if you've not been coaching like this. You're not just can be able to just automatically crush it. 60 minute timeline. You're gonna have to start with five to ten minute pieces of that and really get efficient at those before you can start expanding them to multiple parts. So start small. Start with what you control. What you can control. Start small. Master those things and then build on top of that. Same way you would if you were an athlete.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And here's here's the cool thing. If you're ready to start, we'll give it a try. You're listening to this today. Maybe try for tomorrow. But if you're not ready, download some free programming for us. And you know, whether you actually just implement one of our days or you take one of our days and then think to yourself, how can I make it fit my box or change the workout up? At least you'll have an idea of where to, where to do it and how to do it by using this template. So we recommend.

Fern:
Yeah, if you're still Lofton, you're like, hey, I don't want to pay for programming. There will be a separate kind of build out that we're doing, which is we're going to show you like boots on the ground, like you're gonna get videos where we'll show you how to do this or like, I don't know what to do with it. How do you teach the snatch efficiently in eight minutes? How do you do that? It can be done. But typically, you need to watch somebody do it first and then start to try to replicate that in some way, shape or form for box owners who are paying for the programming. They'll get access to that for me, but for everybody else, it's going to be very, very cost effective. And the content you will get there will be well worth your time.

Ackerman:
So, absolutely. So like Vern just said, do less better. And let's start with the programming at your box and hopefully that helps you become a better coach. That's what we're here for. Reach out to us. All in all, social media platforms, emails, etc.. Episode 3 of Season 1 Dropping in is out by the time you're listening to this episode. So go check that out on our YouTube channel and then we have more topics you want to hear us discuss. Shoot us an email or DMX and we'll make it happen. So for ferne. I think that's it. We've said enough.

We're out of here.

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If you are looking for a great way to convert your mp4 to text, try Sonix today.

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