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159. Eric Hinman | Life by Design

159. Eric Hinman | Life by Design

On today’s episode, Ackerman sits down with Eric Himan. Eric is a health and wellness entrepreneur. He is the co-founder of Original Grain, XO Taco, and Urban Life Athletics. Eric is a contributor and partner at Fellow Gent, an aspirational new media company for wellness-minded men. He was able to retire at 34 and has since been living life by his own design. 

Timestamps:

(2:40) Following Comp train 

(6:27) History

(7:26) Projects now 

(10:23) Social media 

(16:49) Iron Man Background 

(20:55) The Crossfit Games

(23:47) Nutrition 

(30:42) Yoga

(35:26) Recovery

(40:07) Rules for Eric Life 

(44:25) Being Mindfull

Social media:

@erichinman – https://www.instagram.com/erichinman/

www.erichinman.com/

Links that were discussed

www.tenthousand.cc  

www.sunlighten.com

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Ackerman:
All right. I'm sitting here with Eric Headmen. So not everyone may know you. You're kind of I mean, you're you're a web liberti, if you will. But you have to.Is have a derogatory term that will make good professional lives, I'm sure.

Eric Hinman:
And said in some I posted this, but I feel like that's such a small aspect of who you are. And just for the back story, I told you this last time we met my buddy Matt, owner of North Gables, Crossfit,, kept telling me to check this dude out. Check this dude Alice pneumoniae. Tell me all these podcasts you were on. And then when I moved down here, he said, hey, you remember that guy I told you about? He's out here. I reached out to you and I thought I might get a response. And Eric's like, yeah, let's meet. So that's the kind of guy you are. You post about that a lot. Every day I have a meeting with someone new. It's true. And I think what's really cool about you is. In this world of social media, there's a lot of fakeness. I get the impression and the more I've got to know you, it's it's it's real that that is who you are. So if you're not familiar with Eric, check about what is your Instagram handle. It's my name. Eric Henneman. So check him out. Pause. Go check him out. Come back with an air duel while you're listening. But I want to I want to talk to Eric about so many things. But first and foremost, let's be clear. You're a very fit individual.

Eric Hinman:
I love to work out. Yes. I've designed my days around my passions and health and wellness is one of them. And, you know, that goes beyond just working out. That's the recovery. That's eating healthy. It's being active. It's moving. It's now doing yoga. So, you know, it's not just hitting hard Crossfit, workouts that I know I often show on my Instagram story. People think I just smash myself, you know, all day, every day. But, you know, a lot of my day is also spent doing recovery things and slowing down.

Ackerman:
And when I say that to the listeners, they're going to think, you know, Crossfit, game. So let's let's quantify that. You've qualified for the second tier of competition, the top 200 in the Masters division, correct. The online qualifier, multiple years, one year, one year. And that is in the.

Eric Hinman:
Thirty five if be thirty nine,.

Ackerman:
Which. Goes without saying is the hardest division out there. I mean, you're basically competing with two years removed games, athletes, the Steelers and new new co-stars as people that we've had on the podcast. You're up there with him, so you're fit. Let's start here. You train almost every day and you've told me you follow pretty much Caltrain. What was your reasoning for following Cop Train?

Eric Hinman:
I like the programming. I know a lot of high level athletes are following that as well. So I come from an Iron Man background. Background. I've completed 500 man's qualified for the world championships in Kona twice. So I already have a tremendous Arabic engine like, you know, almost too much for Crossfit, and it's affected my strength and that's my weakness. So I really like following country just to build my strength and work on the Olympic lifts and work on the technique. And I love a lot of the warm ups and openers that they have. Just so you're activating all of the different muscle groups to be able to perform those different Olympic lifts.

Ackerman:
Speaking of warm ups. This year, 2020, you're giving 100 pushups in 100 air squat every single day,.

Eric Hinman:
Every single day.

Ackerman:
So today that we're recording this on the 23rd,.

Eric Hinman:
You've done it every day so far.I have. I haven't done it today at all. But it just put it in my calendar before coming here to make sure I do it. Either we can do it here if you want it, but I'll do it tonight. Yes. So where did that idea come from? One of my friends, Medical, who also is in Denver, Denver.

Eric Hinman:
And, you know, very well known in the Crossfit, community. And he mentioned it to me that that was something he was going to be doing. And I said to him, I'm going to join you. That sounds amazing. And I want to broadcast this to my following and inspire people, because there are two movements you can do anywhere. And so often people overcomplicate fitness. And it's like, no, you could do that in near-poor. You can do that when you're traveling. It doesn't take that long. You can do it as a warm up or you can, you know, do jump squats and then Hendel. least push ups and, you know, make it a little harder. So there's a lot of variation to it. It's something anyone can do.

Ackerman:
When you started, was it pretty simple? Like, I'm just going to go through my one hundred air squats and 100 pushups? Or did you split it up? Like, how did you get started with it? Did you tie anything to see how you did on January 1st compared to December thirty first?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah, I've mainly been using it as a warm up, so I'll typically do a set of 50 or squats and then twenty five to thirty pushups and then 50 air squats and then finish off the pushups. Sometimes I'll do it as volleyball shots, 50 wall balls and then the 30 pushups and then 50 wall balls and finish up the pushups. And then if I want to make it harder, I'm doing and release pushups or throwing in some superman pushups with it.

Ackerman:
So I'd like to join in. I need to. I like that idea. I'm terrible. A warm up and myself a great warm up. Yeah, it's I mean, it's a full body. Warm up. Like you said, you can do it anywhere. I think. Do you think by the end of the year you'll be able to do one hundred consecutive pushups?

Eric Hinman:
That's tough. So right now I can do about 60. I shouldn't be. So I wouldn't be surprised if I if I could.

Ackerman:
Pushups notoriously stay challenging.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah, they do.

Ackerman:
They don't. You know, you could your snatch can go from ninety five to to twenty five. Yeah. But you push ups just still up 30. Yeah. So I think I'd be a great challenge. Right. And for those listening, if anyone listening could do one hundred consecutive pushups let us know please. So what's really inspiring about you. I don't want to talk a little bit of value for you. You're from Syracuse. Go Orangemen. Is that the deal?

Eric Hinman:
Orangemen? Yeah. Step season 2. It was a big Syracuse basketball fan.

Ackerman:
Was it good? Carmelo Anthony? He's like most famous. Would you say this? Yeah. So. And then one day the owner of the space I leased from my first gym, Albany Crossfit,, went to Syracuse. Huge fan. And I remember I don't Merrilee year, but I remember going to the final four. That was probably in the mid 2000s. Mary Bitter early 2000s. Yeah. Yeah. They wanted Carmelo Anthony. I was like, You're in New Orleans. You have a Carmelo Anthony poster on your wall, you know? So you got involved in some businesses back in Syracuse, never very successful. And that ultimately is what allowed you to kind of create this life by design that you call it.

Eric Hinman:
Correct. You started an insurance business right out of college. That I still own. And then I was involved in a software company building mobile apps for clients across the country from two thousand nine until 2014. And then since 2014, I've just been really picking passion projects, investing in people, investing in things that I wanted. Bill in upstate New York and then investing in consumer brands.

Ackerman:
So we had John Berardi on recently, founder of Precision Nutrition, and we were talking a lot about. How you make your own schedule and how you he made the analogy. It's like burners on the stove sometimes summer on high, summer on simmer and summer off, knowing that you have complete control of your life now, meaning you don't have a ton of obligations. I mean, you're here on time meeting with me type of things, but. How do you stop yourself from overcommitting and how do you decide which things you want to move forward?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. So I've learned the power of no over time. That's really the big answer, right? The power of it is. Yeah. So, I mean, there's a couple different buckets for me. I don't really say yes to anything anymore that is going to force me to be in an operational role because that's a time suck. You know, when you're managing people or customer service, that's another thing. That's a time suck. So I typically say no, if it's going to involve those things or if it's going to put me in a certain place at a certain time, like I like having freedom and flexibility, you know, I can commit to doing things, but I don't want to be committed to like a 9 to 5 in an office. I just enjoy my ability to adventure so much now. You know, if it's something like that, even if it's high paying, I'm going to say no to it because that's what makes me so much more happy and fulfilled than just making more money. As far as investments. I mean, it has to be something I'm super passionate about and it has to be a person I'm really passionate about. And oftentimes I like, in fact, like 10000 as a company that I invested in early on. Their apparel brand of New York City, most comfortable shorts.

Ackerman:
Amazing. I've ever worn, by the way. So thank you for that. I mean, if you if you if you're looking for new shorts, ten, ten thousand, why wouldn't they go by 10000 brand ten thousand dot Ceecee. I believe the website. Ten thousand. And I'm telling you they are very comfortable. Go get yourself a pair of those shorts. Yeah. Fundable. Is it the Fundamental Foundation Foundation. Sure. But like other tights. And I have the one with the liner's love. So they're super comfortable. They invested in that.

Eric Hinman:
So that's an example of a company where, you know, I can. I knew I could add a hell of a lot more value than just putting money in. Like I was passionate about the product. Passionate about their vision. Passionate about the customer. They were going after the problem they were solving and knew that I could help them build out an ambassador team and I could help them spread the word by wearing it every single day and promoting it. So those are the type of companies I like investing in where it really meshes with my lifestyle. And then I mean, now as far as my day to day, if you want to call it a job, it's content creation. And I'm working with dozens of consumer brands that fit in with my lifestyle and creating content for them, promoting their products and helping them build out their ambassador programs. So, I mean, it's essentially monetizing my day. So that's my other bucket that I would say yes to like, is it going to help me monetize my day and do things that I already enjoy doing? And am I going to feel like I'm adding value in doing that? So I really enjoy working with like funded startups where I feel like I'm moving the needle for them instead of, you know, I have done campaigns for larger companies like my whole life Bully. But I really, really do enjoy like the smaller brands where I feel like I'm exposing my audience to this new amazing product or service and I'm moving the needle for the company. Like I'm really helping them grow instead of just being a billboard.

Ackerman:
And let me throw out there, go to Eric's Instagram, scroll down probably two weeks and look at his Chipotle are saying right around the time T-A and Frazier, but boring posts out there. And no offense to those guys, but go watch Erics and you'll see the difference in someone that is really focused on content creation versus someone who's just happy to be sponsored by a company. Well, let me on that note. How challenging is it for you to remember, if you will, or think about what you're doing all the time and making sure you then post about it, if that makes sense?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. So, I mean, it's just my routine now. You know, it's kind of like waking up and, you know, drinking coffee. I don't think about it. It's just part of my daily routine as creating content around my day. So that's why I have to be really careful about the companies I work with because I don't want it to feel like work. I don't want to have to plan this elaborate photo shoot for a company like I want it to be the products and services that I'm using every single day. So I have them with me. I'm wearing them, and it's easy to create content around them. And, you know, it's been a couple of years now that I've been posting Instagram stories. And, you know, again, it's just part of my day. I'm going through the day thinking about how can I make this interesting to my audience? How can I add value to my audience? And then how can I believe in the products and services that, you know, I have contracts with?

Ackerman:
Yeah. And honestly, you do it really well because I'll look at stuff and based on my curiosity and now knowing you, I'm like, if Erik's using it, I want to check it out. Hmm. So you do it in such a seamless way that it doesn't seem forced, which I think is super important in this day and age. So for authenticity, that's what it comes down to you, right? Authenticity. Tell tell me a little bit about it. Perfect day for you. Like people listening. Some work 9 to 5. Someone boxes. I want to hear. If you've set yourself. Success at 34, you retire at 34. How old are you now? Thirty nine. So you've been doing it for five years. What is a perfect day look like for you and give us as much detail as possible, especially around things like a morning routine?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. So, I mean, your environment is so important. And being here in Denver, that's my environment where I'm able to have my perfect days. I love it here because I have access to unlimited outdoor adventure. I wake up in the morning around 7 o'clock, usually no alarm.

Ackerman:
And what time you go to sleep? I go to sleep at about 11:00 so I can try to get out. You know, you have a woohp. I have to make sure I fully recover. Yep. Yep. I make double espresso in the morning and it's got this fancy espresso machine. Work up a rocket apart. Manto is the is the name of that. Grinding your own being is running my own beans. Yeah. Mix it with water. Just straight express. And I'll just straight espresso. All right. Yeah.

Eric Hinman:
And it's just a fun process in the morning. It's like my first win for the day of trying to make the perfect espresso. So I have that my morning start fairly slow. I'm just kind of planning my day where I'm going to go on an adventure. Who would like to create content for that? You know, looking through my data, CYF meetings with and planning on my morning workout, my first workout is about 9:00 to 9:30 every morning.

Ackerman:
And before you get there. Yeah. Yeah. You get up at 7:00, you make your space up schedule, take, you know, 15, 20 minutes. Is there any app and anything you rushed over as you're writing? Is there yoga? What goes on? What else goes on in that small window of time?

Eric Hinman:
Yogis in the evening, it's generally planning my day. It's figuring. But oftentimes posting on social media, too, is, you know, I'm posting daily. So I'll usually do my feed post first thing in the morning.

Eric Hinman:
But most of it is just kind of planning the day when I work out, it's gonna be with someone like you that has such a big following and puts out great content. Is it well-thought out? Is that policies? Let me just scroll through my pictures and type on Instagram. Are you using an app and writing somewhere else and copying and pasting?

Eric Hinman:
No, it's what I'm thinking that day and I try to make it Instagram if it's in the morning. You know, it might be a picture that I had taken the previous day, but if it's later in the day, it's that day. It's what was happening that day and what was going through my mind and what value I wanted to add. So, no. Very, very rarely is it. Is it something that's planned out? Unless, you know, it's a sponsored post from a company that I work with that I had to get pre-approval from. And, you know, they had this post date. But, you know, that's few and far between most of the companies. They're giving me my own creativity to do what I would like with their products, services and the message that I want to relate to people with.

Ackerman:
And you either have really long arms or you're putting your phone down somewhere and setting the timer.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. So I do schedule photo shoots. Now, once we have somebody that. Yeah, I have a video crew that'll follow me around for a day and shoot videos and photos and yet gets used to a day's worth of for the content. Yeah. And then other than that though. Yeah. I'm either with people that are able to use my camera and I know enough about photography to get a decent shot with someone who just has to basically hit the button or sometimes I'll set it up on a tripod and then the story posts are always yeah just me with my point five zoom on the iPhone using that. And then the gym is super simple. I mean I'm just setting my phone up next to a rack post adjoining it next to a shoe. I mean sometimes people are like you want the iPhone holder for that. I'm like, no, I've been doing this for a long time. I'm just gonna keep doing it my way, setting it up next to a shoe.

Ackerman:
And you're great at it.So you you get to the gym. Yep. Now, like you said you do maybe while balls for your squat. Yeah. Check out train. How much of that is tweet for your day.

Eric Hinman:
So I probably use 25 to 30 percent of top trained and then 70 percent is things I want to work on, something I haven't done in a while or you know, I'm usually with other people. I'll see what other people have written out for workouts. That's the great thing about Crossfitters. You know, it's just a lot of variety. And you know, as long as you're not like a back squatting every single day and just hammering one body part, it's like there's a lot of different things you could do each day to improve than your fitness. So what kind of look through the different pieces that people have written out and kind of pick and choose? And I do a lot of value. I come from the iron background, so I like value.

Ackerman:
How how important was that? And let's not downplay the first time I met you. A lot of people died and certainly an impressive feat. But, you know, everyone's got a friend that's on an Ironman. There's a difference. We're doing an Ironman and being competitive and like you were I mean, what was your best placing seventh overall at the adolescent in Lake Placid now and then you had to qualify for Hawaii, Kona on the top 200 overall at Kona. Yeah. And we've had Chris Hanshaw on your team at second. Back in the 80s, when I mean and now that it's gotten easier and blessed with me, you have to be so are you to finish an Ironman period. But then also to be competitive. How important do you think that capacity is developed over those years? Is currently in your Crossfit, ability?

Eric Hinman:
Definitely important from the aerobic engine standpoint. I mean, you know, Merve, for any of these longer workouts. I mean, I can I can go 80 percent, four days. So, you know, those are right in my wheelhouse. Honestly, don't like Ironman does not help much with the short anaerobic workouts.

Ackerman:
Like, what's your friend type, for example? I'll get to thirty five to forty. What's so good compared to Love Me, my Murph time I can do that.

Eric Hinman:
Sub 30. So I mean comparing it to some of those longer workouts, I'm way off on an anaerobic workout.

Ackerman:
What's your best smile.

Eric Hinman:
She's high school is like 450 right now. I probably run five thirty I would guess.

Ackerman:
Very impressive.

Eric Hinman:
Still, if you if you had to pick your weakness and Crossfit,, what is it heavy lifting into like high volume a barbell movements.

Ackerman:
And let's be clear. You think you told me your snatches, 215, 215, that's still very strong and you're not. I mean, what do you want when? Five. So you're still snatching 50 pounds over your body weight. I understand that's that's your weakness compared to other things. Yeah. So when you when you look at Caltrain trainer, you kind of figuring it out. How often are you really attacking that weakness?

Eric Hinman:
Almost everyday. Live five days a week. I'm lifting heavy. I'm doing, you know, barbell complexes. So, I mean, I'm attacking those weaknesses on a regular basis. Very rarely will I do like a Mersch workout just because I already know that's in my wheelhouse. I can crush that. So pretty much every day is I'm doing that. And they've they've become fun for me now. Like I enjoy the Olympic lifting. I enjoy the gymnastics. You know, I've made those things that I once hated like passions. And I just want to continue improving because ultimately that's what is fulfilling for me is like improving in certain aspects.

Ackerman:
Well, and that's an interesting question. You mean at thirty nine years old. And when we say life by design and so many people think of that as like we have millions in the bag and you can do whatever you want. And certainly you've been financially successful, but it's more about being financially independent. You know, I think that becomes a point where it's like, what now? How how do you measure some of those things? How do you kind of brush aside the fact that you've been successful and still challenge yourself and and find the desire to be better? Where does that come from?

Eric Hinman:
I mean, I think that was just something built into me at a young age, always being competitive with myself, more so than even being competitive against others, like with your man.

Eric Hinman:
It was cool to finish at the top of the pack, but it was more for me and I enjoyed the training probably more than the racing where I would just see like my pace improving at the same heart rate and my what's going up on the bike. And it's the same with Crossfit,. Like for me, I get more fulfillment out of like lifting heavier weight each week than you know, I do going to a competition and doing well in the competition. It's like you have to love the process. It's not, you know, the result. It's like enjoying the process, embracing the process. And the results are going to come if you really enjoy the process behind it.

Ackerman:
Do you have any desire to make it to Madison, meaning to qualify for the Crossfit, games?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. I mean, I would lie if I said that. That wouldn't be cool. Be cool, but that's not something I ever think about. No, actually just had a call with Spartan race today and I'm going to sign up for some Spartan races in December. It wasn't Joe. But some people who work for Joe has a funny story.

Ackerman:
Years ago, Joe had me and a handful of other affiliate owners because he's from Vermont yet to his mansion in Vermont. And back then he was like. Hopefully we can get involved in the Crossfit, space 10 years later. Yeah. The biggest thing in my closet space, it's really cool to see companies grow like that. You're going to do some stuff.

Eric Hinman:
You're going to do some Spartan races, which I'm excited about, but I'm more excited just for purposeful training. That's what I like. You know, now I I have something that I'm committed to and I want to work towards it. I also just got accepted into the Leadville 100 mountain bike race, which I did this past year. I didn't train specifically for it. And it was just a mental soffer fast finish it. I did finish the richest towers.

Eric Hinman:
That's challenging in and of itself.

Ackerman:
Oh, yeah. That's a tough, tough race.That's the one match ended, correct?

Eric Hinman:
Yes. So what's the. Rules for that, I forget.

Eric Hinman:
Sub twelve to get the belt, buckle the belt. I got eight hours. I'm not wearing my time was around 10 hours. I'd like to do it this year, sub 9 hours. That's that's the goal. And I'm going to train specifically for it this year, meaning I'm going to ramp up my bike volume last year. I bite's maybe a max of eighty five or no one hundred minutes in any one session.So an hour or 40 minutes.

Ackerman:
And you're basically six times that.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah, exactly. So I was not I was fit going into the race, but I was not bike fit. So this year I to ramp up my bike volume to a 5 or 6 hour ride and really like you know build that endurance, which is key for. And that's Neidl something a lesson a lot of Crossfit, athletes learned the hard way is like Crossfitters an incredible lifestyle. You get very fit and you look very fit by doing it. But if you want to be a role bigly fit and you want to do a marathon, if you want to do endurance races, that requires like just time and anaerobic heart rate and you have to build an aerobics engine. So I learned that the hard way initially with triathalon. Like I showed up to these races and I looked like I was the fittest person there because I was ripped from Crossfit,. But all these people were beating me and I realized that I had to slow down to speed up with endurance racing. So it was doing longer sessions at that 130 to 140 heartrate, building the aerobics engine, building the durability. So, you know, that's something I'll do leading up to level this year. And if I do any long Spartan races, that's something I'll do as well.

Ackerman:
Along with that, obviously had to be somewhat diluted with your nutrition. Yes. What goes on in your world for that?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. So are you pretty much the same things at the same times every day? And that's the biggest key that, you know, there's all these diets, paleo, Kito, vegan, vegetarian. And, you know, honestly, I think all of them can work, but you have to build it into your routine and put eating on autopilot. And that's what I've done. So in the morning, I'm generally making a smoothie bowl or I have prepared prepared meals from a service in Denver, which is usually a couple of eggs, a sweet potato and a couple strips of Canadian bacon lunch. I go to the same restaurant almost every single day to get a big salad. It's called Green Seed at Denver Central Market. And again, like I'm not thinking about it. It it's just like I know I'm going to go there at 11:30. I'm going to meet someone there. Combining with a meeting and I'm going to get my salad there. And that's lots of veggies, kale, brussel sprouts, tomatoes. I have a couple of rice, too. Scrambled eggs. And then dinner generally is out as well. But I'm going to a healthy restaurant and usually getting the exact same thing that I ordered the night before. At the restaurant and again, like lots of veggies, lean protein, chicken, salmon, and then some kind of complex carp. Hendel. go.

Ackerman:
Crossfit, prescription for nutrition.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah, exactly. But again, it's not like I don't eat paleo. I don't eat a certain way. I'll just like it's on autopilot so very rarely unless I'm traveling. Do I really have to think about, OK, I'm going to get this on the menu, I'm going to go to this restaurant.

Ackerman:
So if you were to have a cheap meal, why would that include for you?

Eric Hinman:
I love granola. I love nut butters.

Ackerman:
I always laugh when someone throws out something healthy for.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah, but but I indulge in those things when I when I have them. So I agree. It's not the most unhealthy option. Like I I very rarely crave a pizza anymore. I'll have that. Maybe posts like long endurance race. I'll crave it from traveling. And there's a, you know, an amazing ice cream spot like salt and straw. L.A. I'll stop it and I'll get ice cream so I don't beat myself up when I do that stuff. But I also never really crave that just because eating is just so routine for me. It's not something that I really have to think about anymore.

Ackerman:
And when you when you say you want intelligence and they like a full jar.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. Oh, yeah. When I was competing in Iron Man, literally every single night, I would have almost a full jar. I mean, I was burning 5 to 6 calories a day then, so I needed to get my calories back in. It probably wasn't the wisest decision to eat them as a jar of almond butter. But yeah, sometimes I have a jar of almond butter at night.

Ackerman:
I had the chance on and we were talking about when he was training for allegedly really tried to get fat adapted.

Eric Hinman:
And that's what I was doing with Iron Man. Yeah. Training your body to burn fat for fuel instead of carbs. So I was eating a very high fat diet back that my diet's very different now with all the heavy lifting in the Crossfit,. But back then, bulletproof coffee in the morning. You know, I have avocado. Jeez, I'm kind of lean protein for lunch. Dinner again would be like avocado, veggies, some kind of lean protein and then, you know, lots of healthy nuts and seeds. So almond butter was my go to cashew butter and it worked. I mean, my body, I could go on a four to five hour bike ride with just water and Tegmark. All right, at 1:30. And not like great food.

Ackerman:
What's your go to? Who's your go to Brand?

Eric Hinman:
I love Justins. I know, right? You're in Boulder. Yes. Great. Right. But one of my favorites that most people would not know about is big spoon roasters out of North Carolina. And they have this ginger almond butter has crystallized ginger and it's amazing. But I don't ordered that often anymore because it's the entire jar.

Ackerman:
So let's check them out. But let's get back to your day. You finish your workout. Yup. You get me that one.

Eric Hinman:
That's that's like I build my day around wins and I know what my wins. All right.No, those things that bring me positive.

Ackerman:
Espresso and working out so it. Out. Right.

Eric Hinman:
What else is there life? No, but like people like this conversation, we're in a flow state right now. I build my day around like things that I know. We're going to put me in that flow state where I'm in the present moment, just like enjoying time at a standstill. So, I mean, Crossfit, does that for me. In the morning when I'm focused on the Olympic lifting, I'm around people that I want to be around. I love the music that's happening. And then after that, I almost always have a lunch meeting. And that's either with a new person that reached out on social media, someone that connected that was introduced to me as someone that I should meet, where, you know, we can add value in each other's life or a like minded person, you know, a creative and entreprenuer someone else into fitness or outdoor adventure. So I'm somewhat selective with who that person is. And they make sure that, you know, we're gonna be able to really add value and have a great conversation. After that, I go on some kind of outdoor adventure pretty much every single day. So I'm in Boulder fairly often. Golden Fairly often. If I'm doing something in the front range this time of year, I'm hiking, trail running, pavement running, and I kind of break it up just on how my body's feeling. Like if I do too many days in a row of pavement running coupled with the Crossfit,, I'll start to feel banged up. So I'll just go for a hike where it's a lot less impact. And then in the spring, summer and fall, road biking and mountain biking a lot.

Ackerman:
It seems like there's a lot of time interacting with people, but there's also a lot of time alone. Alone. I mean, if you need that both, you know, you consider yourself an introvert or an extrovert,.

Eric Hinman:
More of an extrovert.But I do need my alone time just because that's where I get like creative thought and mental clarity. I tell people this all the time. They think I'm crazy. A lot of times I just put one song on repeat when I'm doing my outdoor adventure for two and a half hours and a bike ride, a loved one song on repeat like the top three or the song. You have been listening to a desert a lot lately. Just because, you know, it's kind of a trance and you're just like, you know, it's the same beat going on and on. I like hip hop. You know, Drake songs, Kanye's songs, jazzy songs. So oftentimes put that on repeat.

Ackerman:
You did that 90s hip hop station Desire. Pandora or Spotify is the way to go. You know, you hear a lot of people talk about that, be it classical music for studying or just some sort of I do the same thing. I'll put on a song that I know inside and out on repeat and it just kind of shuts off a part of your brain that allows another part to open.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah, but yeah, it forces your mind not to wander. And it just forces you to be in the present moment. And with a lot of the stuff I'm doing that's also forcing me to be in the present moment like downhill mountain biking and trail running as opposed to pavement running where like you have to be very focused on every single step you're taking.

Ackerman:
Yeah, right. One false step or one moment where you're thinking about what you're going to have for dinner can be the end of your mountain biking career. So when you talk about that flow and that trend, one thing you're really into these days is, you know that. How did that come about? How did someone who's so active not have a yoga practice until 2020?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. So I have a recovery routine. I don't foam roll. Not that I'm against it. But for the last several years, I've been doing heat nice. Every single night. I haven't in threats on at. I have an ice barrel, which is like this big wine barrel that I keep filled with cold water. I have a number of friends that have song.

Ackerman:
It's not that hard to do in Denver.

Eric Hinman:
No, especially this time me and I suppose sitting Coldstream like we talked about. I'd like to do that after this.

Ackerman:
And then people think that getting a song at home is a possible thing. Now, what's the company that you've got on bright sunlight?

Eric Hinman:
Dan, the one person song on it says It's at my house in a storage room.

Ackerman:
It's probably a little smaller in the room we're sitting in now. Yeah. So he's out of it. Say. And you could check those out online. But what's your. Before we talk about, you know, that, what is that routine look like?

Eric Hinman:
Say like an hour, an hour and a half every day, but an hour and a half, I'll sit in an infrared sauna for 50 minutes and then I'll do contrasting baths, five minutes and the cold and five minutes, five to 10 minutes in the heat, depending on how cold I got in the ice. I mean, the key is to make sure that you warm up enough to be able to get back into the ice and get the benefit from it.

Ackerman:
So which of the two do you think is more important in recovering the heat or the ice?

Eric Hinman:
The ice for me is definitely more important. I mean, it just really up regulates your circulation.

Ackerman:
How hard was that for you to develop the ability to spend five minutes in Boulder Creek? Was it like day one I saw on you earlier? I'm following the wind off program where we had five seconds a day. Did you just dive into it? You seem like someone who just was like when we sit in this thing for five minutes, a matter what happens, you know, I pretty much did just dive into it.

Eric Hinman:
But I equate it to a Crossfit, workout where it's mind over matter. Like, you know, when Fran like the sock comes immediately and it's just kind of holding onto the sock, you know, embracing it. And the cold is the same. You know, I don't have any genetic gift to sit in cold water just like I've related to swim.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah.

Eric Hinman:
I think he does have a genetic gift, but yeah. No, it's just like the first while committing is the hardest part. A you know, because there's anxiety around the discomfort that you're going to face. So that's the first key is like committing to frand commit to the cold and then it's the first 30 seconds where you really make a break. It doesn't get any worse. So just like Fran, it really doesn't get that much right after it gets easier. It does. Yeah. It's just committing to it after you've reached that shitty feeling.

Ackerman:
So, so, so what are some things you might say to you. You get in cold water, you get into friends. Right. I like that analogy. The same. What are some things that Eric says in his mind that other people might not say?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. Well, so it's easier to do with other people just like, you know, kind of sucks to go into an empty Crossfit, gym. Do friend, you're probably going to, you know, not go as hard as you would if there's other people around. So I would first encourage you like ex-party is an incredible service that, you know, has these seminars that you can go to and you can learn the briefing behind it and everything or went off or, you know, just finding people that are doing this and going and doing it with other people. That makes it a hell of a lot easier than just going and sitting in Boulder Creek by yourself for even taking a cold shower or putting cold water in a bathtub. Like, you know, those are a lot more difficult when you're doing it alone. So that's the first thing I'd recommend. And then, I mean, as far as my mindset, I just know how good I'm going to feel afterwards. I mean, I I kind of enjoy it now, like in the moment, but I really enjoy it after like, I just know that, like, my mind is going to be, you know, on afterwords. My body is gonna be limber. I'm going to feel great the next day. So, I mean, that's more of why I do it, just like eating healthy. You know, maybe in the moment it doesn't feel as good, but afterwards, you know how much energy you're gonna have.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I think for me going through the cold showers now, you're right, during that 30 second of ice cold raining down on you, does it feel great? But there's a certain when after I did it. And then also, you're right. And that feeling of just exhilaration, if you will. Mean not only are you successful, but your body feels better. Say you're seven days a week, you're doing something relevant. And then five days a week, you're training. You finish your outdoor activity. So maybe it's three thirty five o'clock depending on the day. How do you begin your weighing down process?

Eric Hinman:
So now it's usually yoga.First, I'm going to a hot yoga class.

Ackerman:
How often are you do? I'm on fifteen days in a row right now. I've been all adverse. Yeah. Is that addictive personality?

Eric Hinman:
All in all. Yes. So right now I'm doing that before my recovery routine. And some nights now I'm just doing the hot yoga. And if I feel really good after that, you know, maybe still I'll do something cold. But, you know, I feel like I already got my detox, my heat exposure. I feel really limber doing the static holds and stretching. And honestly, what got me into it was more like the benefits I'm getting for it. We're different that the intention that I set going into it simply was like you, sir. Yeah. So my big intention for 2020 was to practice more stillness and being present on other people's time. So, you know, I've always been I've trained my entire life to be on all the time. And that's obviously very important for athletic achievements, for entrepreneurship is public speaking, whatever is being on. But I've never really trained to be okay. Being off and like just finding fulfillment in, like checking out and not doing anything. So that's why I picked up meditation and that's why I've picked up yoga was for those reasons. And, you know, relationships is where that's really important. Being president in other people's time and, you know, just being OK with like not having life go your way. So that was my intention behind it. But it's helping with that. One hundred percent just.

Ackerman:
I want to throw out there for someone who was heavily involved in social social media like you are. And the two times we've been face to face, I don't think I've seen you on your phone. And I think that's a mistake so many people are making. So true. Super present. You know, and he's the person you're sitting with. Feels like you're important for me for this. Thirty minutes or for this hour. How hard is it for you to be still outside of that part?

Eric Hinman:
And that's why I'm practicing this and I'm getting better at it now. So yoga is helping with that. But I mean, the other benefits I'm seeing for it or my lifts are going up, which my lifts have not really gone up that much in several years. And, you know, it's the static holds and they're just activating muscles that hadn't been activated before. And the meditation has been great as well. I'm not I haven't been as consistent with that as I have been with the yoga. But, you know, I'm trying just to turn off for five or ten minutes every single day. And, you know, I always argued in the past that like my mountain biking, my trail running. That was an invitation. And in a way, it is like that that has helped me be very present. But again, it's being present on my own timeline instead of someone else's. So that's what I feel like. These things are helping me with that.

Ackerman:
And I think that, you know, quote unquote, gurus of meditation will tell you you need to be sitting still and facing north or whatever, you know. But that is meditation for me. I want to hear what your meditation practice looks like. But for me, some nights it's playing a song that I love and you're sitting there eyes closed because that's what allows me to dive off into that different space in my head versus quiet or versus listening to a guided meditation. What is your practice?

Eric Hinman:
I'm new to it, so I haven't figured out my ideal practice yet. You know, a lot of people recommended headspace. I have had other people recommend the insight timer, which I'll download after this. So right now I'm doing headspace just to get a feel for that.

Ackerman:
I like that guy's voice. Yeah. Yeah.

Eric Hinman:
It's very common and I like some of the advice that he's giving in it. So that's what I'm doing right now, doing it and trying to do three to five minutes in the morning, in three to five minutes in the evening before going to bed.

Ackerman:
So going to bed. What goes on you get. You finish yoga.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. Finish yoga. Do my recovery routine. I usually have a dinner out. And that, again, is similar to lunch where it's with, you know, someone that reached out, someone I want to meet with a like minded person. And then after dinner, that's when I'm answering messages, typically. So messages that came in throughout the day, e-mails that came in throughout the day answering those. And then I'm trying to be better about like getting off of my phone, like right before that. I'm not great at that right now because, you know, that is that's like my downtime when I'm actually sitting still and I'm at a computer for a little while to answer those messages.

Ackerman:
Is there any Netflix going on?

Eric Hinman:
No. No, that's. No, I don't watch TV. No TV. No.

Eric Hinman:
I don't have a TV. I have a projector.But I mean, very rarely do I ever pull it down to. To watch it. But I have a TV in years.

Ackerman:
So I like to find out people's kind of roles that they set for themselves. And I got this from Seth Godin, an author. He has four rules, a list by like no social media and no TV. He doesn't do meetings, et cetera. What rules? Purposely or accidentally? You said that allows you to be successful.

Eric Hinman:
Well, as far as the evening routine. So I know this my sleep is tremendously affected by being on too late at night. Meaning like if I if I'm entertaining, if I have a dinner party that goes late, if I'm out at a bar or something like that, like highly engaged, that really affects my sleep. So for the most part, I try to avoid that. I mean, if it's a friends event, if it's something I think I'm going to have a really good time out, I will compromise my sleep and compromise my next day. But in my head, it has to be like O'Mara's words that exactly. Because I know it's going to affect my sleep. And I know that by affecting my sleep, it's going to affect my next day. I very rarely drink. I mean, I maybe have a glass of wine every two or three months. And again, I used to drink. But again, that affects my sleep. And it's not going to affect my next day. And I know what I can do each day to have an incredible day.

Ackerman:
And knowing you hang out with Nicole, is there are there is there other stuff that's going on?

Eric Hinman:
No, no, no.

Ackerman:
Let me just back up, because one of the biggest names in cannabis and, you know, some other stuff. Whenever he's inviting me and Dave Funderburk over, I'm worried about what's going to happen at the house by 10:00. So you really take sleep as a priority for you?

Eric Hinman:
Definitely.

Ackerman:
As it is. You know, I've gotten into. With people about sleep, whether it's on vacation or, you know, like you've said, cutting off a night early and I'm like, no, these eight hours are very important.

Eric Hinman:
Superfly, where a sleep mask, earplugs, I set my temperature at sixty 63 degrees.

Ackerman:
Sixty three degrees. You're not married? No, I'm not.

Eric Hinman:
This is cause problems at relationships where your girlfriends are like, what the fuck are you doing?You bring more body fat. With the temperatures is. Just trust me.

Ackerman:
We'll snuggle during the night.

Eric Hinman:
Exactly.

Ackerman:
So what are some other things that you have on the horizon? You've got somebody great partnerships out there. What are some cool things that are coming in your future?

Eric Hinman:
Yeah. So the big thing this year is I want to start building out some of my own programs. And the first is going to be a seven day challenge and there's going to be different components to it. I'm working with a marketing firm right now in Denver. Building this out. And I want to have challenges in fitness. I already do that often with my workouts diet, recovery, kindness, life by design, self-development and mindfulness. How do you quantify kindness? Select center. Thanks for being awesome card to someone today. So I'm going to have like little challenges or like oftentimes when I run I'll start with my shirt on and I'll give my shirt someone to need when I'm out running. So just like random acts of kindness that you know that there's going to make someone else's day.

Ackerman:
You know, you bring something up. I'm forty one. You're thirty nine. So we're like the same. And I feel like you're significantly more fashionable. And I like it. I like I like. Yeah, I am. What are your what are some tips and tricks you would give to me as you know someone your age? So you don't want to look like you don't look like you're trying to be a teenager. You look like you're a hit. Forty one year old. What are some things where I can do to impress my wife so she wants to sleep with me?

Eric Hinman:
I mean, I think the important thing is like being you and being super comfortable with whatever you're wearing in my fashion represents that.I mean, that the jewelry that I'm wearing actually this is something that I just designed with my friend Mike Adella. Shelly Mace. Yeah, yeah. He has a friend who's a jewelry designer. And she she designed this hawk and feather piece. So we just started a new company together.And we're gonna be selling these Housley.

Ackerman:
I'll your first class. I'm gonna get a little more fashionable. I mean, yeah, you're like you mentioned things in your dress.

Eric Hinman:
Yeah, a lot of my stuff is tied to memories. You know, these were from a jewelry designer and I like a power. Maya, his work and I admire his lifestyle and a lot of my clothes are just from travels. So, you know, they're tied to memories. I think that's a lot of a fashion has become for me as opposed to just going out and buying an Armani suit. It's like I want to have a memory tied to it of like this shirt as a friend's store in Denver. Forum. Forum. So, you know, most of the most of the things that I wear, it's tied to something. It's a friend that owns the company. It's, you know. And then, I mean, social media, you can find inspiration for a lot of this stuff, too.

Ackerman:
Yeah. I mean, and it's cool that it seems like, you know, when you throw something on, then it immediately brings this feeling of joy and happy. Exactly. So what are some other last minute tips, tricks that you might give to the listeners out there? It's inspirational in a lot of them might think this is great, but I have to work a 9 to 5 or I'm married or I'm busy. What are some things they can do to implement today knowing they they still have to go to that job for eight hours?

Eric Hinman:
Yes. Well, I mean, life's short, so make sure that you're being mindful of like how you're spending your time. And if you hate your job, then start figuring out a way to, like, side hustle and do something that you're really passionate about. I think that's the biggest key, is mindful like don't just go through the motions. Make sure that your understanding what things are bringing you positive energy and what things are bringing you negative energy each day. And then I tell this to people often as like sometimes we look too far into the future instead of just looking at the next day. And like I alluded to a number of times, I like to build my day around tiny windows. I know what my tiny winds are. And, you know, like yoga, that's a new tiny win for me that I've implemented. But my days are built around those tiny wins. And then at the end of the day, it's it's equated to a perfect day. And I look forward to my next day doing those same things. So, you know, it's figuring out what are those tiny wins for you each day instead of saying, you know, I want the house and the cars and all of this stuff 10 years from now, the big business.

Eric Hinman:
It's like, what are my tiny wins tomorrow that I can start doing to eventually build my perfect day? And I'm in an environment where I want to be around people, that I want to be doing things that bring me, you know, joy, fulfillment, happiness, and not just like an instant dopamine hit.

Ackerman:
And I really like that because those tiny wins, like you're suggesting, add up to the big winds down the road and people might check out your Instagram and you're like, well, that's great, but I'm not there. One night there was Eric. Yeah, no, I wasn't. And it took years and years to get there and all these little wins. And I love it. A simple thing like a shot of espresso could be a win for the day. And that's really it. If people want to check you out outside of Eric Henneman on Instagram, where some other places they could find you on the left side.

Eric Hinman:
I have everything there on my website. I have my a lot of people ask, you know, what's your diet? I have my diet and daily routine on my Web site. Eric Edmonds.com. So you can go there.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And then I read through your diet and there's lots of links to some great sponsors on there. And what's cool about Eric is if you're seeing it on a site, he's doing it himself. So it's I'm one of those people that are just grabbing sponsors and throwing it out there. But you're actually using them. So their products, you stand behind you. And my favorite one is Chipotle. So is it. Did you find yourself eating much?Paul, I know.

Eric Hinman:
I haven't been eating more, but I do like you public. So they've made a super convenient to get those both.

Ackerman:
And it's really great to go in there and see like they have the Keto on the athlete one. So it's really cool. And like I said, you had it, in my opinion, the best social media post about football. They go check it out. I don't want to spoil it for anybody, but it was highly entertaining and I won't keep you any longer. I know you got a little singed. Boulder Creek, some yoga, finish up air squats and get the best. So good. Thank you so much for taking the time.

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