73. Marc Reklau | The Life-Changing Power of Gratitude

73. Marc Reklau | The Life-Changing Power of Gratitude

In this episode, Jason sits down with the Bestseller Marc Reklau. Marc is a Consultant, Speaker, and author of 7 books including the #1 Amazon Bestseller “30 Days – Change your habits, change your life”, which since April 2015 has been sold and downloaded over 170,000 times and has been translated into Spanish, German, Japanese, Thai, Indonesian, Chinese, Portuguese and Korean. He wrote the book in 2014 after being fired from his job and literally went from jobless to Bestseller (which is the title of his second book). The Spanish version of his latest book “Destination Happiness” has been published by Spain’s #1 Publisher Planeta in January 2018.

Marc’s mission is to empower people to create the life they want and to give them the resources and tools to make it happen. He writes about habits, productivity and happiness.

His message is simple: Many people want to change things in their lives, but few are willing to do a simple set of exercises consistently over a period of time. You can plan and create success and happiness in your life by installing habits that support you on the way to your goals.

Time Stamps:

Can you always bee positive? (05:40)

Where to start with changing parts of your life (14:09)

Jobless to international Bestseller (19:06)

Morning routines (23:34)

Gratitude (27:51)

One thing can change your whole life (30:01)

Mark Reklau: “But I don’t know anybody of my friends who said, oh, god, I got fired from a job, I lost. Everybody was like, most of the time for them, it was real liberation to do something that [they] didn’t dare [to do] before.”

If you want to work with Marc directly contact him on his homepage www.marcreklau.comwhere you also find more information about him.

Mark’s Social Media:

Twitter: @marcreklau

Instagram: @marcreklau
Website: www.goodhabitsacademy.com
Worksheets: https://www.subscribepage.com/l8l2e6_copy

Don’t forget to go over to our instagram and tag 3 friends for a chance to win one of Marc’s Brooks. 

Marc’s  books:

https://www.amazon.com/Marc-Reklau/e/B00IZALH04?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1&qid=1567507424&sr=1-1

Marc’s Recommend books: 

The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology that Fuel Success and Performance at Work – Shawn Achor
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005L193RO/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

Netflix recommendation: 

Brené Brown: the Call to Courage

We value your feedback. After listening, please hit me up with any questions, comments, or thoughts on how we can make this show even better, and if you enjoyed it, please share it!

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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman

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Check out our website – besthouroftheirday.com – to learn more about our private coaches development group.

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Jason Ackerman:
Welcome back, my friends, to another episode of Best Hour of their day. I got to say this selfishly, I put this podcast out because of the amazing people I get to be in touch with, the amazing people I get to talk to. You guys all recognize the Games, athletes, the Austin Malleolo, the Spencer Hendel. But you'll also see some of the best coaches in the world. And while their names may not be as recognizable, the fact that I call them friends and the fact that I get to sit down and chat with them for an hour is just something that I'm so grateful for and speaking of grateful, I got to tell you a quick story about the guests that I have on here, because you may not recognize his name, but I can promise you if you'll devote the 30 or 40 minutes to listening to this episode, you're going to leave a more grateful person. I am on an effort. I set a goal at the beginning at twenty nineteen of reading one hundred books and it was super lofty. And I'm chipping away. I'm in the mid 70s right now. And full disclosure, I listened to a lot of those books as well, but I'm constantly listening and reading and trying to find new books. And I stumbled upon this author Marc Reklau and I didn't know him, but I downloaded his book and he's got so many great books. But the first one that I downloaded was the life changing power of gratitude. And it was something about the way he wrote it.

Jason Ackerman:
Something about how simple and easy it was that really resonated with me. And we talk about it in this interview. But it's just what amazing coaches and amazing human beings do. They take this complex subject, something that's overwhelming, that's daunting, and they break it down and make it simple, whether it's coaching cross fit, becoming a better athlete or simply being more grateful. The best in the world. Take a complex subject and they keep it simple, stupid. So first of all, listen to the interview. Secondly, go check out his books. He's got quite a few books out there at this point. Now, months later, I've also read his 30 days of change your habits, change your life. I've read some of his other books out there from jobless to Amazon best seller to how to become a people magnet to love yourself first. I'll tell you what, it seems kind of cheesy. It seems kind of cliche. It seems like this dude's just putting out B.S. He's not. He clearly lives it. He's been nothing but supportive of the podcasts. He's been, he welcomed me with open arms. I reached out. Hey, can I interview? He was right on board with it. He's talks about checking out Crossfit, too, which is what I really liked about him. But even cooler. Here's what we're gonna do. We're gonna do a little giveaway along with Marc. As you know, we always post pictures of our guests on our social media at best hour of their day.

Jason Ackerman:
Here's what I want you to do. Go to today's picture or go back and find an if you're listening to this a little bit later, you're going to see the picture of Marc. And I want you to tag three of your friends that you think would also enjoy this episode. And we're going to pick two winners at random. So all you have to do is tag three friends. But we're gonna pick two winners at random. And Marcus told us he will send out an autographed copy of his book, 30 Days to be more Productive to our two winners. How cool is that? Couldn't be any easier. Go to our social media on Instagram at best hour of their day. Hey, if you don't already like us or follow us or whatever you do on Instagram, please do that. But then when you do that, tag three friends, no big deal. Just tag them. They're gonna love it. They're gonna get an opportunity to hear Marc talk. You guys, you know, gratitude is a super important aspect of my life. I have a gratitude journal now thanks to Marc. And I write three things every morning and three things every evening that I'm grateful for. And it's all because of this guy. So stay tuned. Listen to my chat. He's over in Spain. The connection is pretty good, though. I'm excited for it. Hit us up and enjoy much love to Marc once again. Thanks so much for being on here. I'm proud to now call you a friend. Marc Reklau.

Jason Ackerman:
All right. We're recording Marc. Welcome to the show. It's it's really cool for me to have you on because like I was saying beforehand, I read Mark's book like.

Marc Reklau:
The life trend and Power of Gratitude. Yeah.

Jason Ackerman:
Yes, exactly. I read that book recently and it really hit home for me. I've read a lot about gratitude and I've tried to practice myself, but I don't know why. But your book. Really resonated with me. Oh, you're still there.

Marc Reklau:
I'm there.

Jason Ackerman:
You OK?

Marc Reklau:
You got frozen here a moment. But it says it's my Internet connection unfortunately, although.

Jason Ackerman:
it's all right he's in Spain right now. I'm in my closet in Florida. So it's it's really cool to have you on. And what I thought would be cool is to talk about a lot of this stuff. You write about gratitude. You write about habits. And you personally went from jobless to a best selling author. Now. Here's what happens when I read that book, I'm like, OK, I could do this, I can read these things and implement it. But then part of me is like, I don't know if I can do that, what Marc did. And I want this to appeal. We have a lot of Crossfit coaches. We have Crossfit athletes. They hear that. And it's like anyone you see Tony Robbins talks about, all you have to do is think positively. Is it that easy?

Marc Reklau:
No. No, it's not that easy. But I can tell you if I can do it, really anybody can do it. Because I'm like just a normal guy. I worked in a normal job. I got fired and in 2013 at the end of 2013. I was always reading personal development, but I was never doing I wasn't ever playing it. And I was never a coach in training. I did a coaching training. So I'm a life coach. And there and with all the books I read about personal development. I noticed that there are many, many exercises that if you really do them for 30 days, 60 days, 90 days, they really work, you know, like the credit which will come back to or writing down your goals or whatever. So the only thing is that people don't do it. They don't apply it. They give up too early because they don't see results right away and things like that. So that's how I got the book. And it's really then I was approved it to myself during my life because I'm doing these habits. I'm writing about not all the 90 all the time, but I looked at I always can do five or six. Gratitude is always there and it really works. And it's awesome what you said. It's not so easy to be positive. And sometimes just being positive is often not enough. You know, we also have to accept that life is like this. Life is like a roller coaster. And when I am when I'm sad, I'm not walking around. I'm happy. I'm happy, I'm happy. No, I admit to myself that I'm sad. I try to work it out as, OK. Why? What happened? Why am I reacting to a situation like this? But also sometimes when you need a little bit of power. Like when you need to get through the day. There are little tricks, you know, like to like faking a smile like this. Yeah. And if you do this.

Marc Reklau:
Like with a pen or something in your mouth, but in your brain, your brain thinks you're actually something good is happening because all the muscles in your face are doing the same thing. So your brain will start putting out all those hormones, happiness, hormones. So this is it. But this is a patch that can help you through a rough day. But at the end of the day, you should always advocate. I mean, like, really reflect and allow your emotions. Don't suppress your emotions. But these are little tricks that you can do. And that's why we come right back to gratitude. Gratitude is like saying good. Best habit or exercise to do because you can be sad and grateful at the same time. You can't be. You can't be. And we have been grateful the same time. So gratitude is like a little bit the antidote to all those painful emotions which are totally OK. Which we have then. But if the more gratitude we practice. The better, the more resilient we get. You know all them. The difference between happy people and unhappy people is not that one's unhappy all the time. And if these are said and the other ones aren't that happy people, they come they recover quicker from the painful emotions. That's the only secret. And gratitude is a big help with that. And it's all it's training. I mean, I'm talking to trainers here, too. You're doing your coaches. You train your body. And it's the same thing, really. I mean, you you don't get in top shape right now because you're doing it for seven days. You're probably doing it for two years or three years. With our mind. It's kind of the same and it's all the same. There are always setbacks or sometimes things don't work or sometimes you're training, but it's not working as well as on other days. So it's all the same. I think the most important thing is consistency.

Marc Reklau:
Keep on work and keep on working.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, well, you said so many great things there. And I think one thing you said that I don't want to overlook is it's okay to be sad. I think that many people get sad and then they beat themselves up for being sad instead of just accepting.

Marc Reklau:
Absolutely.

Jason Ackerman:
Maybe thinking about something they are grateful for. To help them. And I like that also. It's not that you can't be sad, it's just that if you're grateful, you get out of that funk, out of that spiral a little bit faster.

Marc Reklau:
A little bit faster. Yeah. Yeah. And the thing is really and it's great that we talk about it because there's so many misunderstandings and I get confronted with with it a lot. When I go on national radio, I say, yeah, you are. You're right. Self-Help. You say people too. I'll always be positive. And then everything too. I'm like no, I mean of course a positive attitude helps, but sometimes it's just not possible. So then I'm a go. I mean, I have like 20 or 30 dark days a year. Like 10 percent of my of my time. I'm not really happy. But then I reflect sometimes I do gratitude to get out of it. Sometimes I just even don't want to do gratitude. I just want to be a little good, like because it's sometimes you just have to, like, accept what I said, accept it at the end. You get out of it better and you'll feel like better.

Jason Ackerman:
I remember people ask me, what was a time in your life you really remember? And for me, it was a bad breakup. And rather than trying to rebound and get out of it happy, I spent 30 days on my couch watching romantic comedies crying and it's what allowed me to get over it and it really changed me for the better.

Marc Reklau:
Exactly. To me, it happened. Also, same thing, bad breakup. And my best friend, I was living with my best friend who was like on day one after the breakup. He was like, no, let's go out, let's go party. And I was like, look, I'm handling things different. I will not be sad for a week. I'm going to I need this. You have to clean everything out. And then in a week or two weeks, we go out like never before. But now, please leave me this my time, too. Yeah. Also being sad, too deep because to deal with it, you know, when we try to overplay our sadness with saying we are happy or something. It gets worse because the sadness will come sooner or later. So if we try to to to cover. The sadness, sooner or later, it will come out even worse.

Jason Ackerman:
Like a Band-Aid.

Marc Reklau:
And what's important to know? You are in control of it. You can get out of sadness when you want, when you see it's good for you. You have the techniques you can. Gratitude is the most simple thing, if you will trust. Remember. And if you read the book, you know it. So how? What a difference a day makes. If you wake up and say, oh, no. Oh, my God, no, I have to go to work and you think of everything that goes bad. Or if you wake up and you have your gratitude list of all the things in your life that you can be grateful for. It can even be a bad breakup because this bad breakup made you a better person. And then you read this. How do they change it's completely different. So you have the tools.

Jason Ackerman:
That's a really good point too. Sometimes we're only grateful for the things we can we envision as positive rather than, you know, I'm a big proponent of these negative things in your life. Are what brought you here without that break up? I want to be married to my wife.

Marc Reklau:
So look at this.

Jason Ackerman:
So you said earlier and this is true for Crossfitters you know, we mostly crossfitters. Listen to this. If you've not done Crossfit, Marc. Go check one out in Spain.

Marc Reklau:
I one 300 meters over there. I didn't go there. So probably you will convince me.

Jason Ackerman:
I've been a to Nuremberg. I've been to my buddy owns one in Nuremberg as well and their from Germany. So, yes, it's the best fitness training out there, but, well, too many Crossfitters only focus on the fitness. That's it. And I you know, I read your book because this year my goal is to read 100 books and found yours. And I was like, OK, I want to read this as well. And. For me, it's been actually less time at the gym, more time developing myself in reading gratitude, meditation. So say someone is listening and I go, OK, I do need to expand. Where can they start? Sure. Read Mark's book. It's it's an easy read. I know it's two hours, may be sitting down. Attention. You do all the drills and I'll put the links and first worksheets. His worksheets are great as well. Well, work in. Somebody's listening. Okay. When do I start with? Be it habits or gratitude.

Marc Reklau:
The easiest thing would be, as I said many times, I get contacted by people who are at a low point of their life and ask me, Marc, what should I do? And as I look, I don't know because I have never been in that situation. But start with gratitude, because gratitude has something magical, magical and it's scientifically proven, and you're probably noticing it all with you doing the gratitude every day. So scientifically proven, it makes us more optimistic. It makes us see more opportunities, which is very important for them. The more opportunities you see, the more you will cease automatically. Even if you won't cease a lot now, you will sleep better. You will become a positive. You will have less headaches and all this. So. Gratitude is such an amazing thing because it's like if it was a pill, everybody would buy it. So that's one thing if you don't know where to. Start with gratitude. I would always, always do that.

Marc Reklau:
The only other thing.

Jason Ackerman:
Could you be more specific when you say start with gratitude?

Marc Reklau:
Okay. Yep. It's so easy as only writing down three things. Three things that you are grateful for every day.

Jason Ackerman:
Every[day] first thing in the morning.

Marc Reklau:
Yep. first in the morning or lasting in the evening or both. That's even better. And then also it's important when you write it down. Also feel the gratitude. You know, like when you're right on and it can be small things like today I went to drink a coffee in a nice park and then really like feel how grateful you are for that moment. That's three things a day. And those. This exercise. Doing it for four weeks. It will change already. Things in you. It will rewire your brain a little bit. Because you will be, you know, the focus. You know, when you focus on something, you'll see more of it. So when you focus on things you are grateful for. You will see more things you are grateful for. So I for me, it for me, for example, I am writing now 10 things every morning and I could write 15 because my my brain is now so trained to see. I mean, I'm just grateful for everything. I'm even grateful for a rainy day today, although it's a shitty weather here. But it's like, yes, good for something. I feel like comfy here in my in my living room. So gratitude is a lot done for the other habits because people aren't often Marc of 90 habits in my in your book in which one which one should I start with. Like start with the one that comes most easiest to you. You know, this is not a competition. It's not. It's just it's you. So and when you start with the habit that comes easiest for you, you will get little small wins quickly. Because if you start with the habit to go running everyday, it's 30 minutes. I mean, that can be a little bit tough and maybe you will fail a couple of times. But if you start with a habit to drink one glass of lemon water every morning after brushing your teeth, that's a habit that can you can implement quite quickly. And then after five or 10 days, you go to the next one and you already have this win you know, you already had one small habit in that, which what they say is, I don't know yours. You have you in it. But they say that drinking like a water with a little bit of lemon and first thing in the morning is like a very great thing to do. And if you do it for two or three months, you will see health, health benefits, really small habits. Second thing is make it as easy as possible.

Jason Ackerman:
I do that. I drink lemon water every morning and I do. I don't think it was your book I was reading. Another habit. I forget which one. And people were training for a 5km and they did lumped people in, people that had to run every day. And then people that only the first thing they did was stand during commercials. That's it. And the people that started slowly, like you just said, more of them completed the 5km at the end because the habit was sustainable.

Marc Reklau:
Exactly. That's the big secret is because we are sometimes I think we're taking it too serious. We all take it like we we think we have to start with the biggest habit first. And we if we failed and we are already failures and we don't try it for the next year. And I'm always like saying to my people say like it more easy, you know, start with the most easiest. And then if you fail it once or twice, it also doesn't matter as long as you go back to it, because if you see it in the long term, if you see it in a year. If you do a habit five times a week in a year, that's what that's 260 times you did it. Whatever habit it is that still better than zero. It's not 360, but 260 is not so bad. And because it happened to me before, you know, it was like, okay, I failed. After ten days, after ten attempts and now I leave it. And that's 10. But if I would just go back and say, OK. It's also a little bit about being nice to oneself. Not to be too perfectionistic or to forgive oneself and say, OK, well, I've failed once I'm a human or I fail twice. Now I'm going to go back to it because see, in over a year. I'll still make a lot of great improvements.

Jason Ackerman:
So what I want to talk a little more about you. You went from jobless to an international bestseller. Most people. That's too much. It's like I can't do that. And, you know, other people, you know, I look like a Connor McGregor, you know, kind of McGregor's.

Marc Reklau:
Yeah.

Jason Ackerman:
He's someone who believes exactly what you're saying. I'm a little I'm reading Muhammad Ali's biography. All these people that we look up to are basically people that just do exactly what you're saying. And we look at them at such a high level, but we don't realize they got there and you did the same. What was it like for you? What were those first steps like? I mean, you're jobless. It wasn't overnight. You wrote all these notes.

Marc Reklau:
So No. That's the first thing that came to my mind when you were talking. It's like it took me five years. The funny thing is. Yeah. You know the thing. Because we never give ourselves five years. We are we want everything now, you know. I mean, I want to be like Marc. And in three months, that's not possible. But in three years it is more or less possible. And then I really started I started small steps. It was just a lot of small steps. You know, it was like in my case, it was studying self publishing. Then the idea of the book was was building them. And of course, I had all the time in the world. The most important excuse, I didn't have it excuse. I don't have time. I couldn't do that. I couldn't tell myself because I had all the time of the world I was. So I want you to study. I really since I left my job, I have eight hour days. Even when I was trouble as I was trying to study or to research eight hours a day. So I knew I knew I needed this discipline. If not, I go I don't there's none. I don't know where I would have ended up. So I needed this discipline to work every day. And then I thing it was like small steps. You know, I didn't set out to say, okay, now I'm gonna write a best selling book. And then I know it was like, I want to write a 500 word today or a thousand words today. And then it became a book and then it was a book that didn't sell. So I did a promotion. And then another promotion. I did another promotion. I was so close to giving up so many times. You can even believe it. And then but still, I always came back, regroup, analyzed, and then things started to happen. I got on the right promotion. Suddenly I had I had 40000 downloads on Amazon. So I go in the Amazon bestseller list with all the big guys, you know, with Tim Ferriss Yancey.

Jason Ackerman:
Looking on your site, you like number 15 right near, you know, some highly renowned authors.

Marc Reklau:
Yeah, incredible. And it's but the thing is, it all happens. And then I just went on and there were bad times again when I didn't sell again, so I started again. What can I do to sell more books? Where can I concentrate on. And it was. And then that's maybe the best takeaway in the worst times was sometimes. I didn't know what to do when you get really overwhelmed or something. I just always like regrouped and said, what's the next one step? I have to do that thing. Yeah. What's the next step? And you could actually go very far trust when you others to trust the next step. It can. It takes you a long time. Always with giving yourself time. It took me five years. Nothing happens quickly, at least in my experience. But I know I noticed you got better and better and then more of those doors open because it's kind of exponential, you know, at the beginning is oftentimes harder. Then I think maybe the same in Crossfit, right?

Jason Ackerman:
It's exactly what I was going to say. We have a style of work out that we call chipper, which means you chip away one thing at a time. You know, one of the biggest ones is called filthy fifties. There's ten movements and 50 reps. And if you look at the big picture like, I can't do this, it's just too hard. But if you're like, hey, I just have to start and I have to do this first exercise. Now, all of a sudden, you're on the second, third. By the time you realize it, you're done. And too many people. I'm on my third book and people say, how do you do it? And my answer is, two hundred shitty words a day.

Marc Reklau:
Exactly.

Jason Ackerman:
Which never is where I stop. And it's like no matter what I write down to your words and then you to just break down that task. I think Tim Ferriss talks about it a lot. I think about one task at a time.

Marc Reklau:
Exactly.

Jason Ackerman:
You know, for a lot of these listeners and I'm a big proponent of it. My wife and I went to you, P.W., with Tony Robbins recently. And we're big proponents on a morning routine.

Marc Reklau:
Absolutely. Absolutely!

Jason Ackerman:
What is your morning routine look like?

Marc Reklau:
My morning [routine] I have various when I'm top productive, I like when I'm writing or something. I need to be top on the top of my game. I get up at five, five, five thirty. I do a walk of half an hour to clear my head already. Then do a little do a little meditation of 10, 15 minutes, maybe just like just breathing, you know, just like relaxing. Nothing mystical that oftentimes it's even a guided meditation of somebody telling me something and I'm just there. And then I start with the gratitude. Of course, I write down three, three things I'm grateful for and I plan my day. I plan. I've got my all my things together and plan really. Let's say three to five tasks that I want to go. What to do today, And it's great because when you get up so early, it's when I do that and I get up at 5 o'clock, at 3 o'clock, I'm bored because first of all, I mean, I'm at this time from five to 10. I'm like double of three times more productive than on a normal day. So sometimes I laugh when people at nine o'clock, when I see people get to work. I think to myself, I'm really half done. I'm ready to. And then at 3:00, I'm really I don't know what to do anymore. That's like when I'm really productive and when I'm up like a little bit more relaxed. And I get up at 7 or 6:30, but more or less the same. Maybe skip the walk. Maybe do the walk a little bit afterwards. What I never skip is the gratitude. And the planning of my day and also the last thing at night just before like turning off my computer. I already make a little plan on what to do. I want to get done tomorrow because this is awesome. I write it in my book, in my personal experience, I live it. I don't know if you can. If you have comparable experience. But if I write if I write down my plan for tomorrow, what do I want to do tomorrow? It's like when I sleep. I already prepare myself in my dreams and it's like I'm getting up and I know exactly where to go and when I don't do this. Then the morning is like when I'm getting up. Now I'm looking at my emails already 10 already 10 a.m. So not as much. Not a streamlines. It is also a good thing before going to bed like planning a little bit out the next day.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. I like about your evening routine in that worksheet. Is it kind of awesome Reflect on what happened. Well, today, certainly you can. You know, things that went well, but also you're not above knowing things could have gone better. Looking at done better.

Marc Reklau:
Yeah, exactly. That is something I got from a client I was doing. That was one of my first clients like five years ago, six years ago. And I was doing this exercise with him. And he said, I need something else. I need some I need something else. I need to also to look at what I haven't done so well, but without beating myself up. And I said, great, I will put that in my ritual. Doing this is like to say, OK, what could I have done better today? Always like to better a little bit positive because beating yourself up about what you did wrong will not help, but it really helps because it's like somebody if I had a fight with. With somebody or something I I write, I could have been more patient or I could have shut up, you know, trust like swallow it or something. And it's so great because it gives you great perspective. And then maybe next time you it helps you to react to that, to react better in a situation like that. Sometimes it doesn't. And you will go just the same again. But also, over time, you're learning a lot, you know, because if you're reading it every time, I mean, nothing like journaling when you read it every time. Maybe on a Saturday, I would read again everything of the week just to yeah, to go over it again and then you can see your patterns, you can see your reactions, and then it helps you also to react better the next time.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, one thing we promote to all of our coaches is after you coach class, stop and evaluate how you did it. And it's no different than this. It's absolutely not just the last hour, but maybe the, you know, the last 16, 17 hours. But if you're not trying to improve, you're not going to get better. You're going to keep of mistakes.

Marc Reklau:
As a life coach I also did that when I have sessions, I also do it like I'm evaluating myself. Why did I listen to what I know? So really, I mean, so what if I would have to if I would have to resume the best? It's like really? And it's really also that because I'm investigating a lot about self-esteem, about people, relationships, about credit. And that basis is most often times is like self reflection. It's like everything starts with self reflection. Everything, you know, even self esteem or goals or happiness, everything starts with that. Like to look inside you that what do I really want? Also analyzing is why I'm doing well? Where can I improve? But this is one thing. Self reflection, gratitude. I wrote this book about gratitude because. I noticed since I am because my main book, my best selling book is 30 Days. Change Your Habits, Change Your Life. I came out five years ago, four years ago. And since then, whenever I was asked Marc, which is the habit you like most or what do you think is the biggest ingredient to your success? It was it was gratitude. So the more grateful I got, the better my life. It's really amazing. That's right. It has something magical at it. So last year I was sitting there and then I just again got gonna to write a book about gratitude because it's just so important. And that's why it's just a very small book. But I just wanted to put everything in there, everything I ever said about gratitude. Everything that maybe you like to really describe it so that everybody can do it. And you saw it as even something. So. Because sometimes we are not in the mood to be grateful. Sometimes you want us all to have a little bit of self pity and it's OK. But still, the solution is gratitude.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah. As I read the book. One thing that really resonated. Other then drills are super easy is being grateful for those hard times. That was really one thing. I had a few hard times and I look back and you're sad. You're still grieving and realizing those things shape you, those things. You know, one thing does change in your life. And then all of a sudden, it's a completely different life. If you never lost your job, we wouldn't be talking right now.

Marc Reklau:
Exactly.

Marc Reklau:
And i would still be in Germany? Because the first time I was jobless, I was in Germany. And then I decided to move to Barcelona. And I'm living in Barcelona, Spain, which is one of the greatest cities. And I just talked with my mother about it a couple of weeks ago because we passed hard times also from them, from my youth. My life was not a walk in the park. And the girl I was with, she really said she said it's like incredible because all the negative things that have happened to me at the end, they had something positive. It might take like a year two year, five years to find it out. But you look back and you like to think that's what you said, you know? So I like the positives better. I like a nice life better about everything. But if, like, shit hits the fan, it's OK. And I can. And it's also something for me when I'm going through hard times. I always remember, you know, it's like I did it once or I did it five times. I will do it. I will come out of it this time again. I can be resilient once and you get better at it also. The more times you pass through these situations, you get better and more resilient. And this is a maybe a great comfort when you for people who are listening to us now, who are in a bad situation, really something is there is really something positive is hidden there. And maybe you don't see it now, but maybe in a half a year or in a year, you will see it and you will be grateful for it.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, I think for some reason people always assume the worst is going to happen. But when you take a look back at your life and you realize you've always rebounded, you've always been resilient, you've always moved forward rather than thinking it's going to be bad. You need to think back and realize, I've always done this. It will go well, you know, move in the right direction.

Marc Reklau:
And not just because you reminded me of another great thing, because I don't know. Did you see Brené Brown on Netflix?

Jason Ackerman:
Oh, yeah. She's great. I've read all of her books,

Marc Reklau:
Exactly that was one thing when she said because I had to before and suddenly it disappeared. Because you remember that before when maybe when good things happened and then you are like, oh, oh, my God, it's going too well. I'm sure something is going to happen. Something bad is going to happen soon. You always had like, not this. I had it a lot. And then suddenly it disappeared. And I didn't know. I just didn't notice. And Brandy Brown talked about it and they studied people like this and they studied people who who didn't have this. Yeah. Well, just there's no life is good and will go on good. Why should something bad happen to me now? And then they find out what they had in common.

Marc Reklau:
Gratitude. Yeah. So that's. And I said wow.

Marc Reklau:
Another one, another one for gratitude. So it's also nice. It's such an antidote to everything. Everything gets better, your relationships get better because when do relationships get sour, when you're not grateful for your friend, for your partner anymore? I had my share of I mean, I got fired, but I got at the end what I wanted because I was not Grateful at all for my job anymore. For me, it was a burden, a horrible job. I didn't want to go there. So. I don't know the universe or or destiny or whatever. I trust my bad attitude took care of it. I got fired. You didn't want to be here any way, so. And it happens too many people. I don't know. A lot of people in Spain does a lot of now a lot of jobless people and also for my friends. But I don't know anybody of my friends who said, oh, god, I got fired from a job, I lost. Everybody was like, so most of the time for them, it was really like a liberation to do something that I didn't dare. Before. For me, it was totally.

Jason Ackerman:
Now you're a coach. We preach all coaches should have coaches who's been a big influence on your life.

Marc Reklau:
Oh, I had many coaches. I mean, really, after taking them like like in sessions, and influences, of course, as you said, Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, all those great personal development writers. But I also take coaches when I see that I get too comfortable, when I get too comfortable or when I see where I want to go.

Marc Reklau:
Then I take look for a coach, for a mentor who has already achieved what I want to achieve . For me right now, it was with books because I wanted to so sell more books. So I did a course. Of one guy who sells loads of books. Marc Dawson is his name is a British writing crime fiction, something totally different than mine, but he's selling like a million dollars of books every year. So I'm like, OK. I'm interested. I'm gonna see. So at the moment, I concentrated on a lot of that. But surely always with a coach. Everything is easier. Mostly even if it's only for accountability, because we have all of this sometimes that we we sacrifice more or we we are more motivated when we have somebody to be accountable to. Like, for example, for me getting up at six o'clock in the morning to go running. It's very difficult. But if I ask my neighbor to go running with me at six o'clock in the morning, it's very easy because I don't want to failing him. Right.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, I'll send you a message at midnight tonight to remind you to go run at 6am since you're six hours hour head.

Marc Reklau:
Oh, yeah, you are. So I thought if you are in Cali that's too late because it will be 9:00 o'clock. But it's different.

Jason Ackerman:
For every guest that we have on here. I always like to ask a book that they recommend. Now, obviously, all of your books are phenomenal. But do you have a book by someone else that you would recommend the listeners check out?

Marc Reklau:
Yeah. At the moment are always my favorite book of the last year is The Happiness Advantage from Shawn Achor. Shawn Achor is a researcher, a happiness researcher, and he really like collected all the scientifically proofs that we have already about. Yeah, about that happiness really is an advantage that it is that happy brains work better, are more productive, more creative. And I love the book because when I wrote 30 days, I wrote it my letter out of my experience of doing the things and say, OK, look, this works, get it worked for me. And somebody could say, yeah, well, Marc great, it works for you, but that doesn't mean it works for me. But then I found Sean Aiken's book or Achor. I don't know how you pronounce it. And he has all he has to science and he has all the science about the gratitude. And it is the silence about productivity and it. So attitude really helps. A good positive attitude helps. Optimism helps.

Marc Reklau:
And we can train it, it's habit, it's meditation, it's going for walks, it's gratitude, that's how you get more happy. Still. Like what you said in the beginning, being positive is great if it comes from the heart. But if you are faking, you're not doing yourself a favor. So nearly, but you have the tools to get there in a natural way.

Jason Ackerman:
Absolutely. I'm an i don't . I'm a big proponent of I don't care about the science so long as it works and I know for me.

Jason Ackerman:
You know, what comes first? Gratitude or happiness?\

Marc Reklau:
Mmm.. That's a great question. I think gratitude they go hand-in-hand. It's the same thing. Gratitude leads to happiness and happiness leads to gratitude.

Jason Ackerman:
Because it's like you said earlier, it's hard to be sad and grateful at the same time.

Marc Reklau:
Exactly. Really. And it's hard to be. Is it's just it's also hard to be stressed and grateful at the same time. So any gratitude is the antidote to a lot of painful emotions which are normal, which we need because it's like, look, today it's raining. That's the way it is.

Marc Reklau:
Tomorrow, the sun will come out and with our emotions the same thing. So I'm not sitting here now and think, oh, no, my God, no, the next three months it's gonna be raining. No, because tomorrow the sun will come out. So when I'm sad, I also don't think, oh, no, my God, I will be sad all the time hours ago. I will. I will come back. I will be. I will find my way back. I have the tools. What is also very good sometimes is really what I am watching. A lot of stand up comedy right now. All these short videos, short videos on Facebook or YouTube just to do laughs, to laugh really hard until the tears come down because that I do before going to bed.

Jason Ackerman:
That sounds exactly what we do. We love watching stand up comics perform because it just relaxes you. You don't have to think.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, I would recommend the office to you if you've never watched the office.

Marc Reklau:
Yeah, I watched it. I'll re watch it. I just I stopped like it this when Michael was leaving. I stopped it out. Maybe now I have to watch the rest.

Marc Reklau:
But I wasn't the states the last couple of weeks and I I watched a couple of like episodes and it's just always great, you know.

Jason Ackerman:
Yeah, I love it. It just relaxes me, puts me in a good mood. And I agree. Doesn't it's not as good when Michael leaves, but it's still pretty funny. It's been great chatting with you. Is there anything I missed, anything you wanted to throw out there?

Marc Reklau:
No, I'm I'm totally happy. I'm happy to have been on your podcast, anytime.

Jason Ackerman:
Hopefully we will introduce you to a new audience of cross fighters. And in time, hopefully, you and I can stay in touch. I will get you. Did you crossfit yourself?

Marc Reklau:
Yeah, I'm now thinking about it. I just need to sign up. It's really it's like 400 meters over there, but it looks so exhausting. So I'm like, nah. But now maybe you can convince me that.

Jason Ackerman:
I'm not going to lie. It's very exhausting. It's like any new habit market just starts.

Marc Reklau:
I know will. I'm coming up with excuses now. I'm old although very young.

Jason Ackerman:
You know, if you go online, you'll see some phenomenal athletes in their 60s and 70s. And it's never too late. It's never too late.

Marc Reklau:
That's what I always say. When people have excuses, I'm too old or too young. You just go to Google and your your excuse explodes in your face because there's always somebody old who is doing it or somebody young who is doing it. That's great. Exactly.

Jason Ackerman:
Well, I really appreciate you coming on. It's been great. I look forward to reading all of your books. I know it's from the series, right. Change your habits, change your life. And yes, I look forward to reading it all. And you can find Marc on his Web site and I'll post all those links.

Jason Ackerman:
But it's been a pleasure.

Marc Reklau:
For me, too. Great. And we'll stay in touch. I've been to all of our listeners to cheers.

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