78. Mike Giardina | Assault Fitness

78. Mike Giardina | Assault Fitness

In this episode, Fern sits down with long-time friend Mike Giardina, who spent more than a decade on seminar staff coaching all over the world. You may recognize him if you took your Level 2 in the good coach/bad coach. He started at CrossFit Atlanta and is a multi-time CrossFit Games athlete as an individual and on a team. Mike is currently working as part of the Assault Fitness team working with their products and developing training content.

Fern and Mike discuss training, nutrition, continuing education and how to coach things like the assault bike and how to utilize the air runner as a coach and an athlete.  

Time Stamps:

  • How did you get on staff? (8:18)
  • Speaking to you audience not above it (14:08)
  • Setting up the bike (32:55)
  • How to coach the bike (41:41)
  • Why the bike is important and how to coach it (44:10) 

Show notes:

Stephan Guyenet

Gary Taubes – books

https://www.amazon.com/Gary-Taubes/e/B0034P66MY?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1&qid=1568118187&sr=8-1

Mike’s social media:

@mikeg_af

Recommended books:

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (free)

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Fern:
All right, everybody. Welcome back to The Best Out of their day. Fern here with my good buddy, longtime friend Mike G. Mike Giardina around the Crossfit, community. Forever. I don’t know if you know this or you do know this because you were there. You were you were the flow when I like on my final internship.

Mike Giardina:
I remember,.

Fern:
First of all.

Mike Giardina:
Had you, did you have Rob Miller, as you know.

Fern:
I did have Rob Miller.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. Yeah. I totally remember, dude, fresh off of the fresh reasonably fresh off the achilles.

Fern:
Oh, that’s right. Yeah. Yeah. That’s right. Probably maybe like a year and some change. No less than year.

Mike Giardina:
The less then a year as we’re doing double unders. And I want to say. You’re like, are you just you were just doing them again at that point. It was that King of pressure.

Fern:
Yep, that’s right. I was super nervous because I had a little snafu and the little quiz.

Fern:
I. I still have not let myself down from like I still give myself a hard time about that.

Fern:
But anyway, the story I’m happy to tell you some other time. But yeah, it was it was funny because we came out of the trainer meeting you like we’re walking out you like, man, it’s just so refreshing to hear somebody just crush progressions.

Fern:
And I was like, ugh funny story about that.

Mike Giardina:
That’s right nobody. I didn’t get a heads up on it, which is kind of cool to take a fresh start. Yeah. Oh, my God, man you crushed it that never happens.

Fern:
But anyway. Oh, well, yeah. So a little backstory on Mike. How long were you on seminar staff ? Ten years.

Mike Giardina:
A little bit longer. So officially, I was starting kind of an internship process. In 2007, I think officially on staff in 2008. Yeah. Eleven years 11 years.

Fern:
And then multiply times game athlete on the team.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, I’ve done one thing. Look, I showed up in 2008 because I bought the plane ticket for an individual.

Fern:
It counts dude.

Last chance qualifier in 2009. As an individual in 2010 summit, I get that point. The game would already change in 2010, but somehow I snuck in and then I knew at that point that was the individuals. I mean, three times.

Fern:
I’ve peaked.

Mike Giardina:
And now I’m on it. I’m in a nice I’m just waiting for 60 plus and I’m not going to go after it again. Not that it’s easier than I just plan on outlasting the competition. That’s the goal.

Fern:
I’m big on scaling these days like my my my barbell weight. Like I really like 115. I don’t care what it is, but just put 115 on the bar and that’s that’s my wooby.

Mike Giardina:
135 is heavy now man. You told me..

Fern:
We were doing some back rack lunges just today. And I’m like, yeah, God damn, this is heavy is a 135. I am despicable. This is terrible.

Mike Giardina:
Me too.

But also flow master for four years. But it now is working for Assault Fitness. And so a little bit of what we’re gonna dive in today is a little bit of coach development. But what I think Mike has a lot of listeners are going to really dive is kind of some stuff we’re talking about the other day is digging into how to coach the bike and how to coach the runner, which I think is really, really cool. But before we get into that.

Fern:
Is it true? That I wouldn’t say that you. Developed it, but that you discovered the butterfly. Pull up.

Mike Giardina:
That’s an interesting way to put it. Interesting way to put it as discovery, because, no, I didn’t start it. You got. Brad Marshall by those, right, Marshall? That’s the last thing, right?

Fern:
I think that his last name.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. Canadian. Canadian too.

Fern:
Ah, I think so. Eh. Eh.

Mike Giardina:
So I remember watching him. It was funny story if I remember his story. Correctly, he didn’t like go out there and say I’m gonna go do a pull up. That is like a like a butterfly, right? Is there somebody who is trying to teach him how to kip and he couldn’t get it in? In his version of the kip just kind of morphed into the butterfly. And I remember watching him in James Fitzgerald do a workout or something. And I’m like man. That’s faster. More efficient in terms of energy means less movement that’s going on there. It’s a tighter movement. I need to learn how to do this. And it was like the early days of recording with your phone and even your kind of phone at a blackjack or something. They definitely wasn’t an iPhone. back in those days and I recorded it and I would just sit there and watch it and try it at Crossfit,, Atlanta. And he did it. He did it. Unlike the cable crossover machine that far with.

Fern:
Oh, yeah.

Mike Giardina:
I mean, I was embarrassed to say that. So we convinced Dan McDougal, who the owner of Crossfit, Atlanta, to take one of the pull up bars and cut it down the middle so it could do butterflies pull ups for about a year later. damn was a big mistake because it’s ruined the whole bar.

Fern:
And right now we can’t use this bar anymore. I remember I think I remember seeing like I think it was a video of you doing a butterfly pull up like what year it was.

Mike Giardina:
I was just like I was in Jupiter, Florida. I think it’s when I. And we we did that video and it was like the split. Right. Was it at this time?

Fern:
Yeah, I think so. So it’s just like, what am I watching? This is incredible. And then like everybody else, I flailed around like a moron for months trying to figure it out. Back then no one knew how to teach it, like nobody could teach you that. Just like you can either do it now.

Mike Giardina:
Nobody had. [any idea]

Fern:
To fall through it.

Mike Giardina:
Don’t cut the pull up bar then. That’ll do it.

Fern:
I could just get the object the way my chin this way.

Mike Giardina:
So I tried to go right through it. Oh man. Yeah. I think it was Sherwood who who started the rumor that. I’m sure, at least.

Fern:
Sherwood is good for some rumors.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. Yeah. Hey, guys, this is Mike G. He invented the butterfly. Go ahead. Book one. One seminar. And was like I always felt that bed for wouldn’t be unless.

Fern:
There’s worse things to be known for, there’s worst things .

Mike Giardina:
Ya, know. Poor Brad , you did it. He was the inventor of it.

Fern:
Well, I mean, listen, good for you for giving credit where credit is due.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah.

Fern:
The other thing I wanted to ask you was. Is it weird to watch yourself at a level, two, during the test? Be a bad coach while the participants are taking that test?

Mike Giardina:
Totally. Yeah. Yeah. And I have a hard time not laughing when I was watching and especially there was the gosh, I don’t even know if were allowed we’ll just call it the high five. You know, the high five at the end of one. So we don’t give details about the actual test if self. It doesn’t give anything away. Just like that.

Fern:
So for those of you that haven’t taken level two, it’s a lot of video analysis in there and there’s a lot of like coaching demonstration. Mick G gives a lot of the coach in there and not some of them is good. Some of these not so good.

Mike Giardina:
Funny story about that, too. Boz and I. Went, he lives there. So when I went out, I went to northern California to the HQ offices to film this. And I think we were going to have a coach. I could just. We had somebody to fill the role and they couldn’t come there. And they were like, okay. Guess it’s going to be, you so, no practice made so a third time and acted in good codes and bad codes. It was fun it was fun.

Fern:
I mean, at least you got at least she had some experience in there because that’s a lot of what you do at the level 1 and level 2 is demonstrating lot of stuff. So,.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah.

Fern:
I thought you’re bad. Coach was appropriate.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. You know, it’s true.

Fern:
My question is, why are you acting or was that actually your coaching?

Mike Giardina:
That’s right. Well, we’ll never know. We both know I did like looking at some of the participants faces and you could tell when looking up, not like he’s wearing hat, but I’m pretty sure that’s him. That’s part of it. Oh, man.

Fern:
But I did want to ask you kind of like because I’m me and I’m trying to remember. So you got on staff. What year? So like 2008. What was because. Because you’re at Crossfit,, Atlanta. So how did you kind of make your way or like start making your way? And it’s like, hey, I want to be on some of our staff. I don’t actually think I know that yet.

Mike Giardina:
Man So. So that was 2007 when when that first started and then went to my level one, it blow me away. I remember, you know, Greg Glassman, coach coach Glassman, was still he was given lectures. So he’s still running the course. Him Dave, Nicole Annie. And Sherwood, you know, there at the seminar. And Coach is doing the majority of the of the lectures. And I was just like, holy cow, man, this is blowing my mind. I in got my car. I drove home, I called my parents and friends and everybody was in Raleigh and I was in Atlanta for this long drive home was called everybody. And I just wanted to be a part of in some way. I wanted to be a part of it. So I was they would back to Crossfit, Atlanta and started coaching at that time. Seminars in the Southeast probably happened once a month or something. I don’t remember, but the frequency wasn’t high.

Fern:
I might even be a little high.

Mike Giardina:
To the couple months, so it gave me some time to start coaching and get some experience. And when I saw one that was coming close. Dan McDougall good has a good relationship with very Greg. You did at the time. Dan would show up and you’d help coach. And I was like, Hey, I want to want to show up. I’m going to do that, too. How can I how can I help? I just come with you and I’ll set up that volunteer or whatever. So there are a couple I just would come with Dan and then slowly. He came part of an internship process, but it wasn’t nearly as laid out as it is now. Right. So super informal. And through that, I don’t I didn’t even at the time that we realized that we could potentially lead to a job. Once again, I was just happy to be there and do whatever whatever I could. It was like, you know, I would help out with a pull up station or help out with some of that. And then I remember one day we were indicator. Nicole came up and she like, hey, would you want to do this? You want to be on staff or that? The East Coast Staff? I mean, I didn’t even that was an option. Hell yes that’s exactly what to do. So it just kind of evolved. It wasn’t a planned thing to actually be a staff member. I just wanted to show up and be a part of it in some way because it was it was just such a big deal.

Fern:
I think that’s like the people that I admire the most all fall in that category. We’re like it was never a thing that they’re just like they’re like it wasn’t a money thing. It wasn’t for recognition. It was just like, I will literally give my arm to just be a part of that crew. I don’t give a shit what it takes. Know all the people that I consider like my kind of like mentors, people that I look up to, they all fall in that bucket. And like, I think I’m probably like, we’d like to think I’m the same way because, like, that’s all I ever saw. Just like, man. Like, I don’t I don’t care what this is about. Like I just said, I want to be associated with that.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah.

Fern:
Anyway space or form.

Just that use groundbreaking man. It’s such an interesting thing to say. It’s groundbreaking because it’s a lot of. You know, the cool thing about Crossgit was it takes a lot of these different areas, as we all know, it puts them together. So it’s it’s just groundbreaking in the science explanation behind it, the presentation of in packaging of it, Coach the way that he could explain it and connect with the audience to see the light bulbs go off in the audience. And also, as I do, this is change in people. This is changing fitness this. It’s changing people instantly. You feel it changed you. I was like, I want to do that. I want to be a part of some what, some what, even if I’m just carrying around medicine balls that I want to come back and see it again. You know,.

Fern:
I’ll be the water boy. I’ll just show up.

Mike Giardina:
No problems.

Fern:
It’s interesting. You bring up the patch, the packaging of it and stuff like that. Because I did want to ask you, because I I would largely consider like you and Joe Alexander, like very much in the same category, which is like you wouldn’t necessarily know it, but probably two of the smarter guys in the room when it comes to fitness and Crossfit, a

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. Thank you. Thank you for putting me on [level]. I’m so glad.

Fern:
You like because I remember when you were going through your master’s program and like you were like because you’re one of the people that I have always kind of noticed from afar. They’re just always seeking more information, like no matter what it is like in some way, shape or form, because you’re what’s your masters in again?

Fern:
Put to one is exercise, science, exercise, physiology. And then the other one is epidemiology and biostatistics.

Fern:
Yeah, two things that I would never. Yeah, I get a masters and so now I have I have like great respect for that because I’m doing I’m doing a masters right now in sports science.

Mike Giardina:
Awesome man.

Fern:
Well yeah, not so much because I remembering like how much I’m not good at school and how much I hate it but it is different doing. Yeah.

Mike Giardina:
You apply it. That’s what I learned about it. That’s what I thought is like going through it. There wasn’t. There was a lot of new stuff that I was learning and I can very quickly apply it to all the experience you have, which is unique because most students that are going through there, they all they have an educational experience. They don’t have training experience. So there is no way to apply it to any experience that they you know what I mean? It’s all theoretical.

Fern:
Well, that’s funny because we’re I guess I. I thrive. I said that air quotes, but I thrive in some of those discussions, you know, like this is that there’s people that said a lot of things about me in this world. And one of them, my teachers like this is the best response I ever had. I’m like, we’ve got to find you another pool of students, because how does the best response you ever had and like you or scraping the bottom of the barrel, my friend. Well, what I wanted to ask you was I think what I what I think is very interesting because I’ve worked with you, you know, I wouldn’t say time but enough to see that even as you progressed the amount of knowledge that your accumulated accumulating. I’ve never seen you kind of speak over the head of the audience that you’re working with. And I don’t know if that’s something that you do intentionally or it’s or it’s just something that you’re aware of. But, you know, I’ve seen you in particularly in some of the nutrition talks and stuff like that where where people would kind of challenge you and you. And you had your wherewithal, I guess, to, like keep your cool and basically very politely say, I’m smarter than you. But is that something that you work on or like or is that just.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, yeah. I think it is something I work on. But you know what? It is where it comes from. Is it? It comes from how I. Digest material. You mean like how I learned so out when I’m studying a topic, I’m trying to learn a topic, I’ll learn it the way it’s presented first, which is usually pretty technical.

Mike Giardina:
Right. And then try to relate it to something in my experience. And then I’ll try to explain it to myself and be able to explain it in a more simple term. Then when I’m finally comfortable with taking this information and then writing it down and explaining it to something that’s very simple and makes sense to me, then I know I have a good grasp of that topic that makes sense. You know, it’s interesting that it just worked out that way because it wasn’t you know, as we teach in Level 2, that’s great, right? If you have all this technical information and then you can simplify, present it to everybody so they understand, that’s awesome. But that wasn’t my original intention. original intensions is making sure that I understood it properly and being able to. It’s almost like explained to myself in simple terms, if I could do that over and over and over and over again without looking at it like, OK, now I understand this because I took it so technical. I took it. I broke it down. Now it’s simple. Now I can talk about it. But any problems concept is there.

Fern:
And it’s interesting because you and I were talking before we had record about just effective coaching and like you’re watching your kids gymnastics. And I was just watching one of my coaches kind of go a little bit late in the course.

And that’s something that I try to do the same thing is because, you know, like I’m just not I wouldn’t consider myself I would say I have a pretty good amount of experience, but I wouldn’t consider myself like somebody who’s technically smart. But there are certain things where I’m the same way, where like I have to break that down into these really small bites. And then what I consider myself to know something, if I can explain it to somebody without using any technical verbiage, you know, very much like we do on a level to it’s like, OK. And that’s coaching. But can you explain something like some of the mechanisms for insulin or diabetes? Like can you take that and explain it to somebody like casually at dinner and get them to understand it?

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, you know, I mean, it’s that’s a big issue with some of those is you can do it. You’re going to you’re going to miss some of the regular.

Fern:
Sure. Like there’s no way to do that casually. But I think the process of breaking it down to something as much as possible is the point.

Mike Giardina:
That’s the things that the simpler you know, the harder one sometimes is like this is the thing about eating diabetes now is a lot of people to some degree understand. The mechanism, right? The interesting thing with some of the chronic diseases like that is there’s enough education there for people to understand the reasons why it’s happened, the mechanisms behind it. It’s just. creating, creating action that now is the hard part.

Fern:
Yeah, like getting people to do something about it.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. A harder one is like the Keto diet or something. You know what? You know, Bethany and I. My wife. We. We’ve experimented with. We try to experiment with everything. When I was giving nutrition lectures at the level, one big thing for me was I would love. I always tried to have some experience in any popular diet within the Crossfit, community. That way, when whenever I was asked about it, I had the. The information I would study it, and have the technical information, but I would also have the definitive evidence kind of match that up and given my experience and it always felt like it was a a better answer to a question if I could do it that way. So but then taking somebody like a family member or if I go visit my my mom in New York and then like it was Keto Diet as I am and I’m trying to explain that.

Fern:
That’s where I get somebody who’s not in the fitness, nutrition world at all. You’re like, damn, I thought I was. I thought I knew this, but I definitely know this as well.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. And you can you can explain it. But the simplification is the hard part. Like I use that. I mean, the liver is making ketones and I’ve three the effects of ketones. And I don’t even know what you’re talking about.

Fern:
Yeah. Your parents are like, oh, right. Well we’re gonna go out now.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. But you can say things like, you know, you typically glucose. And what we want to do is when you want to have less reliance on glucose and you’re going to use fat fats are going to create this other food source. And so the food source can be used for almost anything that you do. You know, you can kind of you can simplify it to some degree, but it’s just trying to simplify it and show the utility behind it.

Fern:
On that note, because I know you’re a big reader, just all of all types of stuff, is there either fitness or nutrition book that you would recommend that coaches read to? Basically, it’s to offer their technical knowledge, right. So we know we don’t want to talk that way, but like, is there something that people book that they could read even if like a textbook that they could start arming themselves with information to have those conversations? It’s one things. One thing I do think a lot of folks in the community don’t do very well is we get in this Crossfit, bubble and there’s only Crossfit,. I’m like, listen, man, there’s a lot of stuff out there and you need to be able to speak to as many of these things as possible because believe it or not, there is a lot of crossover between like what other people are doing and how they’re training and nutrition and stuff like that. We tend to get blinders on because Crossfit, is so effective that we ignore everything else outside of that bubble, just like no Crossfit,. If you ask me like Crossfit, is the way I eat meat and vegetables, nuts, you, all that stuff. But I should still be arming myself with as much information as possible. Is there anything that you’ve read in the years? You’re just like this is good information?

You know what interesting. But that’s hard because with nutrition, I don’t know if there’s ever one thing where I was like, this is the one. But one thing whats helped me, it’s trying to read a little bit about all sides, it never be so nailed down, the one side that your you’re unwilling to read or learn from somebody else. And a good I think a good example of somebody who has some things on common with maybe who we call Crossfit, nutrition. Right. But other things that are not is a bad name. I’m sorry if you listen to this stuff in there. Stephen, Lynette, hello.

Fern:
I think it’s Star Stefan. Yeah, he was on Joe Rogan with. Yeah. You’re talking about.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. Yeah. So he even it back.

Mike Giardina:
I think it’s great. Yeah. He has a very interesting approach to how the brain is the culprit behind obesity. And I really enjoyed reading that. So I think there’s been. He’s a he’s a neuroscience neuroscientist. So we’re smart and there’s an iceberg. So for me to say I think there’s some way to this. I mean, that sounds pretty. Stupid on my part, but obviously there’s something to it. But there was something about it that really resonated with me when I started looking at personal experience with people that we’ve trained and talked to who had some type of let’s call it food addiction or obesity or chronic disease. It had all the educational information to eat. It’s really hard to get them to. Convinced themselves or their brain to do the right thing. You know what, let you know. That’s just one example, I think. I don’t think there was any one book that I could suggest. My suggestion was don’t rely on one book. Don’t rely on one book.

Fern:
I Like it.

Mike Giardina:
Find something in the super low carbohydrate realm. There were some great people out there. You look at Rockwell’s stuff, this stuff is great. You look at like Dr. Lastics..

Mike Giardina:
This is really good. Like I said, Say his name again?

Fern:
And I think it’s Guyenet it is pretty sure it’s Stephan Guyenet.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, this book is great. Obviously Gary Taubes stuff is good. It’s amazing. And everything from good calories bad calories to. Was that his last one? Sugar.

Fern:
Is it? Is it. Why?

Now if there’s one after that. Anyway, see. You’ll see his list of books. Yeah. The main thing is even if it’s still common, if there’s somebody out there that here’s one thing I know a processed food. If anybody is promoting processed foods. I would probably stay away from it, right?

I mean, there’s I don’t think there’s anything there’s nothing that’s convince me that you should be processed food and going to be healthy for you. So I think you know, I think that’s why I think so great about Crossfit, nutrition and what they what they promote in the courses. Eat meats vegetables nuts and seeds some fruit little starch and no sugar, and Like if you’re eating vegetables and fruits, you use the Whole Foods. That’s kind of coverage. Imagine if everyone just did that.

Fern:
Probably wouldn’t have chronic disease.

Mike Giardina:
Being under 30 grams of carb for a day or 100 grams, I was like, you know what? If you’re eating berries and broccoli to get your friend your grams, awesome. You know, you’re you’re going to be OK.

Fern:
What I think is interesting about the whole nutrition. I don’t even it’s a controversy. There’s a lot of people that have a conflict with each other. I guess it would be one way to describe it. And if you really listen to and you read some of their stuff, they agree on like 99 percent of it. It’s just like you guys are arguing about 1 percent. And I don’t know if that’s because some people just want to be right. But I’m just like, man. Like, if we just remove, like this minor thing from the equation, they’re saying the same shit, which is like you need to eat high quality foods, stay away from their fun stuff and measure it like whatever the whatever the fuck it looks like for you, measure it and then and then repeat that process over and over it.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, that’s it. We need to admit. I think for me, this is a common opinion, but I think for measuring measuring like maximizing results, maximizing results, which is great. It could be aesthetic results. It could be could be health results. Could be performance results. Whatever it is, it’s maximizing. But to get a A. Large models, results. You can just eat high quality foods.

Fern:
Yeah. That’s it

Mike Giardina:
quality foods.

Fern:
I am a firm believer.

Mike Giardina:
It’s not easy.

Fern:
It’s not easy. Yeah. And Coach Glassman, says it seems like simple, not easy. But I’m a firm believer that like once a year you should do some sort of weighing and measuring just to calibrate your eye. But the rest of the year, you’re probably OK without doing it, because once you know the stuff like you can make those decisions. But what you can’t do is somehow convince yourself that eating that shitty food is good. You know, like once you know, you know, you can’t unknow it. And it’s like that without being armed with that alone will put you in a better spot. Just like with. This is a shitty meal. I know. I need to get back on track.

Mike Giardina:
I think there’s something to be said for that, right? You know, and then at that point, it’s your decision. It’s like I. I can eat this shitty meal. I know it’s a shitty meal. Tomorrow I’m back on for cure.

Fern:
You know.

Mike Giardina:
One of the principles I don’t think this is for everybody, but one thing that I’ve. And if they’re practicing lately, that’s helped out is I’ve kind of shied away from strict Keto for a while. And my gross carbs and net carbs are higher than they would have been for probably the last couple of years. But I’ve reduced my eating window, so it’s kind of intermittent fasting thing, you know. But there’s no it’s not the same every day. It’s just kind of by feel. So it’s usually somewhere to somewhere between 16 hours of fasting, but 22 hours of fasting. It really just depends on what’s going on during the day. And sometimes there’s not even that much. Sometimes it’s a little bit less. And I also there’s there’s that rule just kind of. Reduce the window and then two don’t eat the hours before bed. And those two things alone were amazing. Look, I don’t. You can get from this one. It’s harder to make those bad decisions with that reduced window. I make better decisions. Control quantity a little bit more in the morning anyways. And I’ve lost this alliance to food. I mean, how many years have we heard about the every 3 hour you should eat, right? ` really cannot get the wrap up that metabolism. Eat every 3 hours that drilled in us. I mean there are people are still saying that stuff. Know what i mean I mean, like, I just don’t agree with that. I don’t think you should buy a clock. Nobody eat by a clock I mean, no animal eat by it’s 5:00. You know, it’s the way that we we work. No, there’s nothing that says that any animal should eat at a certain time in a time span throughout the day. And I think that carried over for many years, even into Crossfit, words like, oh, god, in three hours, man, I need a snack. I need something like if I don’t do that, I can perform on this. It’s like it’s crazy. You lose it. Its reliance on a set in your traveling or somthing theirs was just not good food available. It’s been like few hours. It was wait till I get home. I’ll have some great options available because I’m know that I’m going to be okay if don’t eat right now. You know that.

Fern:
Yeah, that’s something that I’ve also started doing, is that when presented with like either a bad option or not eating, I type started to gravitate towards not eating. And I’m and I’m like, I’ll be fine. I wont die.

Mike Giardina:
You’ll be fine.

Fern:
I’ll be alright.

Mike Giardina:
I think there’s obviously a physiological mechanism to hunger. Totally. I mean, we can’t deny that. And of course, there is I think there’s a mental side to hunger where it’s like we’re just use to eating, And if we miss that, you mentally bodies gotta eat. eat.

Fern:
It’s habitual, just like.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, feeling a treats like a physiological response, like you so hungry, but once you break that, then all of a sudden like today, man, we. This morning we worked out we had a couple meetings and stuff and it was 2:30 or something and I haven’t eaten yet. But I’m not hungry. I’m not relying on it. Is that okay? No, it’s now the chance to eat tonight. No big deal.

Fern:
I do that. I do that on the regular in the affiliate, you know, like like if I don’t. It’s sometimes all. Sometimes I really just enjoy breakfast. I really try to eat breakfast, if at all possible. Like I just like eating breakfast. But I’ll regularly eat breakfast. Go to the affiliate, coach couple classes, do some stuff around the gym, gym, do some console personal training, work out myself and then get home at seven, seven thirty. I like I haven’t eaten in 13 hours. Like I didn’t die. That’s weird.

Mike Giardina:
Would be interesting too, if you had like a blood ketone measure like like iVillage.

Fern:
When I was think when I kind of like that, I was like I’m kind of accidentally doing intermittent fasting and like my. Same I did. I did it inbody. And I like not training a ton right now, but I did anybody almost like a year apart. And my my metrics were almost identical. I think I was off by one percent and a couple pounds and it was like two pounds and one percent body fat.

Mike Giardina:
Within error, you’re within error.

Fern:
That could have been time of day.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, total. Mostly I did you a little bit more water for sure. Yeah, it’s interesting. Like I said, the thing gets rid of it and that’s just something that I’ve been toying around with and it’s worked really well. Well, the interesting part of that is. For the first few months when I was doing this, I would do some, like ketone measurements daily. And I was within therapeutic doses. So I was like a one more Keto little of my blood. So it was interesting to not focus on it. And I was eating quality food but not really worry about how many carbs I was getting. But then I’d have this reduced feeding time and then all this time of fasting throughout the day. And I was still producing a reasonable amount of ketones. I mean, pretty close to what I was producing when I was deep in ketos.

Fern:
The human body is amazing.

Mike Giardina:
I’m sick of that overused term, I think. Right. But there is something to metabolic flexibility. I think,.

Fern:
Yeah,.

Mike Giardina:
You toy around with things enough and you expose your body to enough. I think there is some metabolic flexibility worse like cocaine and foods coming in. We have an alternative fuel source for that. So let’s use it. Right.

Fern:
Let’s switch modes and get it done.

Fern:
I want to switch modes here because I want to talk a little bit about we were talking about coaching and because I’m a lot of the listeners for this podcast, are either affiliate owners or coaches. And I want because you’re now at Assault Fitness doing a lot of cool stuff for those guys. But I want to talk about both the bike and the runner, because these are two pieces of equipment that fall absolutely in the same boat as the rower, where the vast majority of coaches are going to mail this in and then just get on there. It’s pretty intuitive. You know, you move your arms and your legs and we get it done. But we that’s during our clients a disservice. And this is this is a topic that comes up regularly, which is why people don’t program things like a long run or maybe even a long bike.

Mike Giardina:
And because, you know, it’s always like, well, nobody is going to show up. And.

Mike Giardina:
Right.

Fern:
But the question is why? And it’s because you’re not teaching them anything. That’s what you got. So I wanted to ask you like a couple different things about like where can coaches do a little bit better with it with regard to fault identification and then and then like performance tips? Because I would put myself mostly in the category of like I know some tricks having been on the bike a lot, but I don’t know that I could probably coach it effectively by any measurable metric.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, yeah. We think about the bike. I think the bike has some very simple points of performance. But like you said, they’re often ignored. Right. I think starting point in this is like any any movement, starting point with the bike as you have that you have to have a right set up and it’s key. And you know that that starts off with, you know, seat height. And most people, I think, have this you start off like they were going to lines that my hip, I’m going to sit on it when I put my four foot on the pedal and to make sure there’s a slight bend in the knee with the pedal a little bit. And when I look to make sure that the pelvis doesn’t rock, there’s no reaching of the legs that you can test it. That way you can have them put their heel on the pedal, on the pedals all the way down and make sure the leg is straight, election straight at that point or fit on the knee and no rocking. Right. That’s something I think it will have a pretty good grasp of where to seat height should. Forward to seat postion this to see what people. I don’t even know if people adjusted. Some do. Some don’t that plays, That’s a big part to toys you about it. You put that seat too far forward. One, it puts you in this super upright position. It’s really hard to produce force and you feel like you’re sliding off the seat. Right. So it’s really hard to be efficient and produce any power. And the spike of the seats, to far forward, unless you have like a super short torso or something like that, require that you might require that and amusing myself in this example.

Mike Giardina:
Then if for me, if I put it too far back then it is like I’m falling for it like my torsos to incline forward and you kind of lose that balance, right? There’s no more balance in my movement. I’m pedaling, so I can’t produce force on the pedals and I cannot produce force on the handles. And that can be left over the handle using so much of this here, you know, midline your core to prevent yourself from falling over. So there’s gotta be that’s gonna get that sweet spot. Now, obviously, you have a longer torso that might be a better position for you. For me, it’s kind of right in the middle. Right in the middle. I can sit on the seat, you know, I can put the handles right next to each other. I have a slight bend in the arms. Right. If I push one all the way forward, I’m not reaching them through my shoulder really far forward. That would create some unnecessary movement in the torso. Probably seen. And people were. Yeah. So I’m not reaching. But also I have enough lean too. I can push. With the arms and press hard into the pedals, not like fighting to prevent myself from falling for it makes sense.

Fern:
Yeah, it’s actually interesting because I’ve always gone off like a traditional bike setup for the seat, which is, you know, I kind of when the pedals forward, I want my knee pretty much over the toe, not taking into account that displacement of the handle changes my position.

Fern:
And that’s something.

Mike Giardina:
Of a double like a double crane. Arm in like that changes the the actual rotation with the pedal. Right, because it’s like two now.

Fern:
Yep.

Mike Giardina:
So it actually changes when the pedals. So there is that there is an adjustment has to take place for that as well for sure.

Fern:
So I should be able. So if I’m setting up an athlete I should be able to have them other where the pedals when they’re doing just doesn’t matter.

Mike Giardina:
So listen, so would be better to look at the handle. So let’s say you you think you have the right spot. Sit on the on the bike. I want you like nice and upright at this point and then you upright at this point and the handles are together side by side parallel. Yep. You go to grip them and there should be a slight bend knee. And then from there the lean that happens with be when I did that. So it’s a good sport now would be the optimal lead.

Fern:
OK.

Mike Giardina:
And then from there, that’s where I want to be. You kind of hold yourself there. Obviously, everything’s engaged here. And you have most to put on hold yourself there and produce force here and then produce worse than legs.

Fern:
Ok. So once we have the setup and then what are we looking for?

Mike Giardina:
So a couple of things happened, along with the setup to which you’ve probably seen this is just making sure that they’re grouping correctly. And now you start to pull points with from other movements of an beach pressing your shoulder, pressing the bar is always going to be right there at the base of the palm. Yeah, we see a lot in this off. People get tired of this. Now, you have a lot of ways that energy and we’re not pushing on this direct line of action.

Fern:
So if you like here, we’re not watching the video version of this. Like Mike’s pointing out the base of his plan. I always like to describe this. Like if you were going to punch somebody with an open pam, where would you punch? You would not punch in your fingers. You’d punch them with the base of the hand.

And that’s what that’s why you want to. And sometimes, depending on the workout, the workout itself is a lot of pulling. I’ll keep my fingers off and I’ll just focus on the pushing part so I can get that direct line of action based upon.

Fern:
Got it.

Mike Giardina:
point one. Another point would be, you know, elbows, grow your elbows and what you have. What are they? What are the shoulder position?

Fern:
It’s everywhere. From what I’ve seen on the Internet, they’re just flail wherever flowing elbows up.

Mike Giardina:
And we’ve never. There aren’t a lot of movements that I’ve ever seen where we want it, like a massively internally rotating shoulder and the elbows flaring, really. You know, I mean, it’s as if there aren’t any ladies swimming, you know, I don’t know what I want.

Fern:
I think even swimming is not like this anyways.

Mike Giardina:
So you would want the elbows closer to the body. Okay, shoulders back down. So you create this platform. We get the lattd and the muskets around the upper back. And Gates have actual strong platform, the press off of. We want to we want to reduce this this kind of urge to twist with the torso and reach with this internally rotated shoulder. You know, it’s here and it’s elbows in and pushing and squeezing the abs and pushing from here.

Fern:
As you’re just as you’re describing this, I’m thinking back to the games because I had my I was judging Katrin on that assault bike toe to rings and the ring and she smashed that bike and didn’t even look like she was working. Like she’s just incredibly efficient on the bike. There’s not a ton of air movement on her body. And now as you’re describing this, I’m thinking back to her and I’m like, that’s basically exactly how she bikes.

You know who else? Matt, look at Matt. I was in the crowd. I remember looking at Matt fraser. I like doing the same thing. Pretty controlled torso position. Elbows were in good line of action on the handles. Nice and smooth. he wasn’t first off the bike, but he was up there getting off the bike. And he he was able to I mean, obviously, he’s a monster. So there are other things that go into play why he did so well. But yeah, you conserve energy, right? So when he has the second worked out with minimal rest, there’s something there that to to put into that workout. Whereas if you’re just losing all this energy because you have a lot of air movement, you’re smashed. Know, it’s just pulling from what you’re going to do later on in that workout.

Fern:
So how are you coaching athletes into that position? Like, are you going step by step? Are you doing some drills? Like, how are you kind of teeing that up?

Mike Giardina:
So, yeah, I think that it’s step by step is always the key. So, you know, if I were coaching this, we would obviously getting the right set of position and then, you know, we could just work on some some arms only to make sure that the elbows are in. And we got a good line of action or good drive from the heel of the base of the pam just working on there.

Fern:
I do that a lot during the war, which is I’ll just I’ll do them I’ll have them go like 30 seconds legs and I’ll take the legs off, put them on the pegs. It just work the arms to you just to see if anything crazy.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. Same thing with pulling. Keep the elbow close. It’s like doing a dumbbell. You take the points of performance. If I could keep the elbow close, keep the shoulders back and down, see that solid platform to pull against. So it’s the same thing with pulling and pedaling. You know, pedaling a little bit different pedaling, you might just have some subtle differences in technique based off of the workout itself, but they generally soft bike because you don’t have put the spells or anything like that. It’s the flat pedal. The focus is like twelve to five. Right. They push down and you can create that kind of circular motion with the focus. The drive is on that twelve to five motion. That being said, if I’m sprinting. Initially, try this maybe you already have, but if you’re spending it, if you just think the tiniest amount about unweighting that trailing leg, things tend to speed up a little bit more tend and serve a little bit of energy. Since it’s not something that I think has to be thought about much like more of a moderate, it is. But when you’re going at it and that slight unweighting of that trailing leg put you right back into that next pedal stroke. I like really well, but they’re simple. Those is the simple things in the bike that I think you can. You can teach to an athlete and you can coach you through athletes to get them more efficient, have them conserve a little bit more energy, get more work accomplished. And what do we know is carrying this thing up with squats and pull ups and all these things that make me smash yourself on that bike have nothing, you can conserve a little bit energy and get that work accomplished and then put into the barbell, awesome, you know. So, yeah, that’s that’s kind of the simple coaching of the bike,.

Fern:
I love how you. I love it. And this is obviously what good coaches do. You took the movements that people already see a lot of. Right? So you talked about the dumbbell row. You talk about keeping the elbows and tight. So we’re just taking those good movement patterns that we want to see. We’re just applying them to the bike. So the question you ask yourself as a coach is would that be acceptable if they had some sort of weight in your hand or a barbell? The answer the answer is no. Then we need to try to correct that. Do we want them over twisting the torso and moving really like. Same thing if they were running. All right. I don’t want a massive amount of torso rotation when I’m running. It’s crazy expensive and it’s no different training, which is completely with the next part, which is most people are not going to get an assault runner because all they see is, you know, it cost a lot of money and I can run outside. But you and I were talking about some things that that I didn’t even really think about for whatever reason the other day. And now I’m kind of in the boat like every affiliate should have one in there, gym, like at least one. And the counter to that is like, well, I can’t use it in a class if I have just one. OK. For sure. However, there’s a lot of other usage outside of using it in a class setting.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, in a class setting would be awesome. Right. But you’d if you had just won a major utility of the runners just running assessment. It’s it’s really hard though. It’s been done for years. It’s really hard. And it’s very inefficient to coach running technique on a track or through video. Ya knowSo because, you know, you have you have a split second to look at somebody technique and even if slow it down a lot with coaches eye on your camera depends on the the placement of the camera. You have to it’s a delayed coaching. They’re sending you video. You’re setting it back. Right.

Fern:
You’re getting it. You’re gonna get, Max, 20 yards of running.

Mike Giardina:
At the most. With the runner. You have this ability to walk and see this athlete from any single line, any angle. You want to look at them. Right. You can give coaching cues. First of all, you can assess it right there. You can start giving coaching cues like you would any movement And then you have this like real time feedback and instantaneous feedback that’s taking place between coach, athlete, coach. I’m telling you something. I’m watching to see if that improved your running technique. You’re telling me how that feels. And that’s how we get you to improve it. So that alone makes it super valuable to go to the gym. Let me give me an example. That was really cool because that would work on my coaching. one athlete on the runner, but we had a Nuno Costa, come up here on Friday just to do.

Fern:
Yeah. He’s been on the podcast.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah. Yeah. And he’s he’s great. Super knowledgeable.

Fern:
Running is he’s jam And I’m like he’s like that’s his shit.

Mike Giardina:
Totally we had we had 11 people. We had. Five at a time on runners. He’s walking around, he’s assessing all five athletes and then putting us through some drills, coming back, re-evaluating five athletes at a time, giving some good coaching cues, watching them improve. Then he passes through a running workout and then that running worked was constantly coaching and helping our athletes improve. He had the before and after video. It’s a one and a half hour clinic. You have Twelve athletes. Eleven or twelve athletes there. And every single one of them. Significant improvements in either the torso, the how quickly to pull their foot off of the tread or the reaching landing in the right spot. These are significant improvements to running mechanics across a large group of people that happen in one and a half hours. It’s hard.

Fern:
That’s Crazy.

Mike Giardina:
Person to move. Well, you know, of running like that in one and a half hours. I mean, it was nuts. It was nuts in this that the people here that some of our recreational runner, some of them don’t like running at all. Yeah. He had a good variance in the type of athletes that were there and improvements and all that.

Fern:
That’s super cool. So we are probably a little bit we have five at our gym.

Mike Giardina:
That’s awesome.

Fern:
Well, but now I’m now I’m kind of just realizing how awesome that is because like we probably would have just get on there and run. But now I’m thinking about because there’s so many things that we most people like. From a coaching standpoint, you know, the of the go to is like, hey, your heel striking. You have there’s so many it like we need to look at arms, we need to look at arm swing. We need to look at stride length like that’s going to tell us if they’re striking. It’s also going to tell us like how long their foot is gonna be on the feet, on the ground as they’re making that stride. Like, what is that position moving? What is their torso? Are they are they like this? Are they one of these military guys who spent 20 years wearing kit and they naturally run like that because that’s the default mechanism to shift the load when they’re running and how tocorrect that athlete from doing that. We have a lot of guys like that and like myself included for years, I’m like, I got to stop running in this big shift because it feels better if I’m loaded with 50 pounds of shit.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah,.

Fern:
But I’m thinking about that. I’m like, dude, I’m like, this is. And then and then pacing as far as like if you have the ability to have like a metronome which could pull up on your phone and look I on.

Mike Giardina:
Well, absolutely. Cadence is huge. Cadence is huge. You know, one of the questions we had at the Wendy clinic was how do you prevent particularly like slamming the foot in the floor, right. How do you prevent that? cadence, once you start up there, cadence somewhere around that, like 170 to 190, you start to get that cadence. But it’s really hard to slam your foot to the ground.

Fern:
It’s almost impossible. Like you can’t do it. Like you have to pick your feet up so quick to maintain that cadence like you. It’s just like ya. I just I mean, and some people are like, well, you just tell him to go faster. And I kind of but not really like you can up their cadence without, you know, you can still smash your foot on the ground at a pretty high cadence, if you’re stride length is a little bit too long.

Mike Giardina:
Totally the thing about the struggling thing to the runner is it people do it, but it punishes the runner and you’re like, oh, my gosh, my hamstrings. And gluten is like this heavy, heavy ass tread. And you’re gripping the tread way on the top of that curve and pulling it down behind you. You don’t mean it. It’s like, come on. You know, the idea is the land in the same spot. You know, the cool thing about the runners is, yeah, it’s curve, right? Yeah, that’s about it. You look up, right? There’s a there’s an already a lean taking place because the leading outputs at the ankles. Right. So I’m sitting in the right spot and the runner. You already have that like that your ankles are like this. Do you have that ankle taking place? So, you know, if you’re standing on a runner, it moves. If you’re standing in the right spot, it moves by itself.

Fern:
Yeah.

Because really, it’s you got to lean already going on your. You’re on the tread. And if if you’re holding onto it and you lean like this, you just bend over. It doesn’t do anything. And if you mean more of the equals that can spot off behind you.

Fern:
So to get away from me real quick.

Mike Giardina:
Really quick. Right. So it teaches you how to lead correctly. Which is really cool. And then from there, you just teach your athletes while you’re leaning towards moving, what’s going to what’s going to take less energy, grabbing it and continue to push it behind you? We’re just pulling your foot off and get into the next step.

Fern:
Well, I was I was running some intervals this afternoon and I was just doing four hundreds and two hundreds. And I was thinking about our conversation. But even if you didn’t have a coach, a ton of the real time feedback you’re gonna get as an athlete on on the runner is super valuable. Like if you find yourself constantly moving forward, backward and forward on there, like you basically need to work on a lot of everything. It could be stride, like it could be cadence, but you can play without real time and get all of that real time feedback that I’m going to be able to transfer immediately to to look to to the road.

Mike Giardina:
Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah. Even without a coach for sure. And this is something else about some of the experience.

Fern:
Are there any drills on there that you’ve found, like you’ve like found that kind of help people? And I want to say correct. Like start to get that light to go on about like what kind of running technique should look like? Because it’s not it’s not necessarily self-correcting, but it is kind of self-correcting when you get on there. Like it’s really expensive to run shitty on the air.

Mike Giardina:
It’s super expensive. I think the biggest the biggest thing is just learning. One of the biggest things is keeping it simple, right. I think one thing that helps most people is something as simple as telling them to run tall, because the minute you hunch over on the runner, you’re most likely going to over stride . Right? Right. And both those things are gonna be super ineffective and costly on the runner. So something as simple as run tall because you’re already on incline. It’s really forcing you to lead from the ankle. So I don’t need you to lean by bringing the shoulders for I just need you to be tall. So it’s interesting, as you look on video, it looks like the torso is straight up and down, but it’s because it’s four. So you force them to run tall, teaches them how to run tall. Looking forward, does what are you going to look at? Look at the console, min. You look down like this starts to pull everything forward. So you want to be looking. You want to learn how to. Hold your head straight and look down with your eyes at the console to the console and pulling your foot, because once you do that, once you’re leaning correctly, then you’re nice and tall. We will continue to hit. That tread’s going to move. It’s going to start moving. You just have to learn how to pull correctly.

Fern:
It is funny. It’s funny how it works because you can tell on there when you like. I was thinking about it. I can tell when I got into a good stride and like I was getting my feet up when I should like, you know, shockingly, it was easier.

Mike Giardina:
Exactly. And.

Fern:
Then but, you know, the challenge is like, OK, like, how do I maintain this? Because, you know, that that’s always been I guess I guess my argument of like some of the pose position, you know, and I’m not saying pose as bad, but like I’m just not sure I like how sustainable that is, like as I stretch the distance out.

Mike Giardina:
You know, you have this thing about that is from other reading I’ve done, I’m running. There are some things that technique wise like that everybody agrees on, right? Yeah. There’s like one main thing that we don’t agree on that heels Strike Perfect. Strike. But. I think that is less important to where you strike.

Fern:
Ok.

Mike Giardina:
And I don’t even think that everybody has to strike their forehead right underneath. There’s center of mass and hips. The analogy. Very few people probably hit that spot like right on. That’s that’s like the loading point, but I think is probably more important running is that, you know, there’s this spot where you want to land, where the knee is bent. So you land, know, landing and the knees bent. If your foot in front of your knee, you’ve got some problems right now. You’re talking about jamming your foot in the ground here in this braking mechanism, having lowered the shock of that of that impact going up bone instead of muscle. But if you can get the foot, at least at the very least under the knee or closer to center of mass in the hips, that’s going to your sweet spot. Maybe it’s a range about that much. Yeah. Some of the research I’ve looked at recently has shown that a lot of people that are hitting their heels in that spot are not feeling all the impact with the heel. It’s kind of like kissing the ground with the heel and the majority of loading happens when the foot rolls to flip and then they pull their foot off the ground.

Fern:
But now that I’m thinking about it, if you’re if your heel hits there, it can’t be on the ground that long anyway.

Mike Giardina:
Not it’s not. By time you hitm mid foot, that’s when the majority of of let’s say, gravity and then forced to by this really creating a pitching down. Right. So that’s pretty interesting because then at that point. You know, you start to read about high level triathletes and even it’s marathon runners that start off with a four foot strike and then end with a heel strike. But where they strike never changes. So as they fatigue, they’re okay. Because then it becomes super cost effective. Cavs are smashed, you know, 20 something miles in your race. Well, it’s OK at that point. Now they can run with their heel hitting the ground, but it’s still hitting or striking in the same spot. And I think there are quite a few high level marathoners and triathletes that will switch throughout their race.

Fern:
Yeah, that’s for me. That’s one of those ones. It’s kind of like the running. And I’m like there’s good runners. And there’s a lot of what like what you said is like the majority of the mechanics are where they should be. And then there’s like these weird little, you know, I guess like flavors that people put on it based on their biomechanics and metric stuff, just like weight lifting. Right. It’s like there’s some key things we want in weigh-lifting. Think back to that. And like you’re gonna see a lot of people that are gold medalist with a slight bit on the elbow or maybe they’re pulling from the toes a little bit early. And I’m like, listen, when you get to that point, that’s just personal preference at that point.

Mike Giardina:
Well, like we’ve we’ve all learned from all the years in training Crossfit, that there’s just not one one way to teach and movement to 100 percent of the people. You know what I’m saying. Like there are some things that should happen for sure. And we just said that with running, there are some things that we don’t want you overreaching. We don’t you just slamming your heel on the ground with your foot in front of you? I don’t want you leaning or bending at the hip. Obviously, that’s not good. But there are some some key things that’s like it’s like in the air squat. In any squat, there are some key points. But foremost, everybody should do right. I don’t want you sweating with a load of the running back, but there are some things that maybe are. Well, we can argue about a little bit in one of them being, you know, your knees come in a little bit so they always stay at home. I don’t know. Some athletes can obviously lift with their knees coming in. Could you? And here’s the funny part.

Mike Giardina:
I’m sorry, I just went completely off tack, but so I’m going to butcher this quote. But it always I’ve always thought about it. Travis Cooper. Yep. Will we live here in the Southeast? He luckily, we had him a Crossfit, Atlanta, and he changed our team. We’re competing on the. And really up. But anyways, he went out to California and he was training with a really high level Olympic lifting coach. I don’t remember what country this guy was from. Super high level olymic lifting coach. You said that they they were allowed to ask its coach a question, and Travis said.

Mike Giardina:
Who have you coach? I have all the people you’ve coached who had the best technique. And you said the guy who had the most weight on the bar.

Mike Giardina:
Oh, right. But if you if you’re you know, if you’re the fastest person in the world, you’re in the most way in the world. You’re the best Crossfit, in the world. Whatever it is, I’m like, hey, you’re doing something right now that you if you take all those guys and there’s going to be a couple little ones, things that maybe don’t fit perfectly. But ninety nine percent of their technique is right there.

Fern:
Yeah.

Mike Giardina:
And we hold on to the nuance. It’s not easy. knee out knees in, you know. We look at everything else is great. Everything else is the way you teach it.

Fern:
It’s like he’s knees are in, yeah, he’s squatting 300 kilos. So maybe maybe you’ll be all right. Sure. He’s fine.

Mike Giardina:
I mean, sure he’s gonna bfine . You know, it’s just it’s just not always, always remember that.

Fern:
Who had the best only the best technique you ever finish first.

Mike Giardina:
Yeah, totally. Yeah, absolutely. Anything this see , I would look at the athletes on the men and women side, even in the games you would’ve won. Yeah.

Fern:
Well so I talk about that every weekend at the level one. And this is something that, you know, it comes up in the technique lecture and it’s just like, listen, it is it is not a coincidence. And I can speak to this from a judging standpoint. The winners from a judging standpoint. They are not a problem.

Mike Giardina:
No. you tell them no rep or give a warning to they’re. They’re not going to waste that time to argue. The next step is already changed and their three steps ahead,.

Fern:
They’re 3 reps deep. But they all just move well, like their movement is very. It’s just like that was a good squat. I’m not nobody’s out there with a protractor on on the winners you like. I don’t know if that was below parallel what I’m like. You just don’t have to talk to those guys. They just move well. So when you look at that and you’re just like, no wonder you’re not as tired as everybody else is, like you’re just more efficient than everybody else. And Hinshaw talks about potential talks about the Coach Hinshaw they move well and then something that you can learn from both the bike and the runner. They understand pacing.

Mike Giardina:
Right. They understand pacing, and that’s what I was saying to you before the show started. It’s like even with one thing that I’ve noticed a lot of my training lately and I don’t train for anything other than.

Fern:
I just try to be the fittest person in your house.

Mike Giardina:
Exactly, which I’m not. No, I’m not. I’m trying to get back on the top. And so I started what I wanted to start running again back in April. You know, I used to enjoy running before I was a Crossfit, or I was a triathlete. I loved running it was meditative. I would go out for a run and come back and I said things quickly. I lost that end for the last 12 years or so. I would count every step, every step I feel. And I hated every step of the run. The. I missed just going out for a run in California. The weather’s beautiful. We have trails and good roads and the beach all that I want to go out for a run and actually enjoy it. So started running. More communities could be getting about three days a week. And obviously that improved greatly. I enjoyed running again and then running for performances and shot up.

Mike Giardina:
But the cool thing is that we do short intervals, moderate interval, long intervals and in long days and. In running those types of intervals and then applying it to workouts, you start to understand your body’s response to intensities. You know what I’m saying? So you start to create on your own. These these gears. And it really helps us out with this piece. If you understand the workout, the intensity of the workout, how long it should be, how long it’s going to take, what it’s going to take to get thought it. I’ve done this. I’m done with running. But I understand with this kind of intensity, feels like that’s mixed modal. And there are some other things they’re going to play into my fatigue level. But I still have a good understanding of what it’s going to take and the kind of speed in the running to be. But just like breathing heart rate and all those things that maybe you’re not measuring with what you can feel it, you know, when you’re in tune with that, then you can kind of self select that pace. You want to attack that workout.

Fern:
It’s funny, bring up heart rate because I’ve been playing with heart rate monitors lately, doing the same thing. Just trying to see. Yeah, I might. And then kind of just checking. But it’s interesting because I’m like, man, I feel like I’m overreaching and I’ll check the ball of the screen real quick. And I’m like, yep, yep. One 70s reaching. I should really throttle back a little bit, you know?

Mike Giardina:
Well, you know, I can listen to it. You don’t even need a heart rate monitor anymore.

Fern:
But if you do, it is interesting. Once you start to refine that a little bit, you like, OK, what is the sweet spot that allows me to continue at this pace? But my whole thing is like to use a heart rate monitor. But, you know, it can’t be just heart rate. It needs to be in the presence of some other data. Like what? What’s the work you’re doing, whether it’s running or lifting? That’s that’s where that really, in my opinion, becomes valuable. Not just like you burn too much calories like that doesn’t tell me, you know, what my biological output was. So that does what I think is like we’re gonna start playing all that, because I think it is super valuable if used intelligently.

Mike Giardina:
Absolutely. Absolutely. I mean, we talked about it. You know, when I teaching Level ones. It’s a correlate to intensity. But there’s no doubt that there are changes in heart rate as intensity changes. Right. Could it be off to some degree based off other factors? Absolutely. But it does give you some data that you can use if you get used to it using intelligently. Absolutely.

Fern:
Well, listen, dude, I know you’re busy guy. We’ve talked about a ton of stuff. And I know you’re trying to get home, trying to get out of there for the workday, bro. So last question. Any book that you recommend doesn’t have to be like not any fitness related, just like something you’ve gotten into recently. You’re like, that’s a good book. Reckon. Or if there’s something that you just there is a book that you recommend everybody read.

Mike Giardina:
Mmm.. Jezz. You know, I. I’ve. This is going to be way off topic and it’s not going to do anything for our readers and entertain them. And I think most people or a lot of people probably read it. But I got into the Dave Castro kick of fiction. And so this is going to be totally off training topic.

Fern:
That’s perfect. You know, it’s educating, inspiring, entertaining. So we got to check that box.

Yeah, yeah, for sure. So, Dave, one of the flow master meetings are a lot of them. Which meeting was it was last year. You gave us all book and I read the and demonstrates kind of as a starting off point. And I asked Dave, I said D would want to read. I want to really attack in a book. Give me the best one of all the ones you get. What’s the best one? You told me The Count of Monte Cristo. Jessica unabridged version. Things like this thick. And then I couldn’t put it down to that. It was one of them. It definitely was one of the best stories. That’s read. I followed up with A Tale of Two Cities, which is really good. It took me some time to understand or follow Charles Dickens language in writing style a little bit. A couple of chapters before I was like, OK, now I know every time where he’s talking about with those two books. I guess for me and for anybody. How often do we read articles or listen to podcasts or watch videos on something technical about training? This or that? And how refreshing is it to read something and just just.

Fern:
Check out.

Mike Giardina:
What’s going to going to happen next? What’s going to happen next? Yeah. Last time I read anything like that,.

Fern:
That’s really cool. That’s something I need to do better. And I I tend to read a lot of the same stuff. Like it’s.

Mike Giardina:
It’s great really. It’s our business.

Fern:
I do think there is something to be said for like being able to detach. And I do I. This is completely anecdotal, but I think the mind needs that.

Mike Giardina:
I think it does. And I think you learn without realizing that some awesome communication skills by reading some of those classic novels. Right. I mean, I think there’s a lot that you learn there will subconsciously, without realizing it, that you can apply to relationships and talking to other people. So maybe it does help with a certain skill set that is useful in our in our in our jobs.

Mike Giardina:
So it’s fun.

Fern:
Going to get some fiction to get some fiction reading on there. Guys, if you guys need to get a hold of Mike, he is on the IG. Also, get him up and follow some stuff. If you guys have not looked at assault, that is. They have and you’re looking for programming offered. You do offer a lot of programming on there, just like I subscribe to the emails and we try to sprinkle some of that stuff in their programming. So check it out. But you gotta be way better armed to coach the assault bike to coach the air runner and improve people’s fitness. So dude, it was great catching up. I really appreciate.

Thanks for having me on the show. This is great. Awesome.

Aright Brother.

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