88. You’re Not a Good Enough Coach

88. You’re Not a Good Enough Coach

In this episode in this Todd, Ackerman and Fern discuss issues brought up in the last episode and what was promoted by the 10-year Affiliate Gathering. Why are affiliate’s de-affiliate? And the discussions that were brought up during the gathering. The host all give their options on this issue that is facing the community. And the title of the episode really does highlight the problem that is facing many coaches, that simply it’s easier not to teach the muscle-up or snatch. 

Timestamp: 

(7:46) Most people don’t need to learn snatch or Muscle Ups? 

(12:23) Showing people what Crossfit is

(17:39) Affiliate fee / Quality Assurance Programme 

(20:36) Strimga around bring better 

(25:53) Dropping the word Crossfit 

(31:18) The website

Ackerman also poses a question/challenge to you the listeners: 

  1. Find out why the people in who are in your life and are of the older generation, for example, your Mom, aren’t doing Crossfit? Have that conversation with them and see if your box or class could offer what they feel is missing. 
  2. Also, to look at your box and if they are severing the underserved population? And how could you as a coach do that? 

We value your feedback. After listening, please hit me up with any questions, comments, or thoughts on how we can make this show even better, and if you enjoyed it, please share it!

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Fern:
All right, everybody. Welcome back to the Best of their Day. We are going to pick up episode two from where we left off at the 10 year affiliate gathering. And we left with something that actually Coach Glassman addressed in his talk. And he said something that I thought was very succinct and pretty profound, which was it's not not Crossfit, just because you decided to do it smarter. Right. So this kind of segue ways into the question that we were asking about when we were talking Austin Beginging be giving and stuff that Jay and I where talking about. And Todd is here with us today as well, which is how do we continue to improve or how do we continue to try to figure out ways to thrive in order to be at the 20 plus year affiliate gathering as the community grows in order to provide a better product? And the reason this came up is because one of the affiliate owners mentioned the word functional fitness class when she was asking a question. And I thought, Coach Glassman, his response was very appropriate. And and just so everybody's clear. Like he I don't believe he was angry and I don't think she was trying to do anything malicious towards Crossfit,. I think she was doing something because we all acknowledge that Crossfit, can be scary. So everybody's trying to navigate how to bring people in and train them while figuring out how to navigate the crossfit is intimidating.

Fern:
And it has a Bad name in some scenarios. But what he's what she was explaining was that they don't use barbells and they start people with lighter weight and they use less complex movements, all of which fall in the bucket of like being a better coach in and understanding how to scale and coach better. And that was his response. And to elaborate on that, I think what he was saying is it's and this is me kind of speaking for him, but not really. It's kind of inappropriate to change the name because you decided to get better at it.

Fern:
So I'll let you go from there Jay.

Ackerman:
Well, I think part of that we were trying to really dive into was all of these boxes that are offering boot camps and watered down Crossfit, is it? And let's Todd chime in. I mean, since this is his first time hearing this, Todd's on the call, by the way, and we're all back home and this isn't happening live at the affiliate gathering. But. Is it just because coaches are not good enough? Do you have to water down Crossfit, to get 30 people in because they're afraid? Or do you have to water down Crossfit, to get 30 people in because you can't coach 10 people on the snatch while simultaneously teaching 10 people a high pull while teaching 10 other people just maybe a kettlebell high pull. What do you think? oh go ahead Fern.

Fern:
No, I really want Todd chime in here, but I want to add so I kind of walked into another conversation later that evening that I did not prompt. And there were some. Some. Really, really good trainers having this discussion and talking about people were creating the spin offs and it was that the trend is people are moving to lower skill programs. Right. And I think the problem is not that people are moving to lower skill programs like. I don't fault anybody for that. I think where there is either a lack of self-awareness or just blatant ignorance is that they're doing it under the guise of. That Crossfit, is too complex or scary rather than understanding that they're actually doing it because they're not very good at coaching Crossfit,.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I think just for those that are listening. Never should have gone to the Affiliate gathering what happened at the affiliate gathering, that was one of the cool parts of that. It's just everywhere you turned. There were 10 plus year box owners that had some insight. And these conversations just kind of naturally arose and we all would sit down over coffee or drinks and whatnot and just dive into it. So definitely if it's offered again. Plan on attending but todd What do you think about that?

Todd:
Yeah, I think it goes. I think there's a couple of angles to look at this thing. Number one. You're going to create your own brand within your community. And so simply having the name Crossfit, in your name. Yeah, there might be some people that only see that portion of it and might have a preconception of what that is. But most of the most of your brand and what people think of your your your gym is gonna be based on what happens within the walls of the gym because that brand's going to be dictated by what your members are telling other people within the community. And so if you know, you've got people in there that are at all skill levels and ages and abilities and all of that kind of stuff, and they're, you know, getting results and they are staying safe. And they are telling the people in your community about that. I think there's gonna be a less less of a stigma about your specific gym. Now, that happens obviously over time. If you are brand new and just opening up your gym, it's gonna take some time to create your individual brand. But I think a lot of that boils boils down to that. So then that turns into, well, what are you doing with inside the walls of your gym? And if you are just staying true to the program itself and sticking to constantly very punctual movements performed at a high intensity. And you're not just trying to jam a bunch of that into an hour, but you're spending time warming up your athletes.

Todd:
You're spending the majority of your class practicing the movements and teaching them how to do them correctly and then jumping into one workout at the, you know, towards the end of the session where people can go hard and move well. then it's all gonna work out, work out fine. You know, it's like even if we're doing Amanda, you know, it's got snatches and muscle ups and I can have any and everybody in my class is doing that. As long as I'm teaching to the lowest common denominator.

Todd:
So maybe we're starting with the PVC pipe as we're going over the snatch and as we progressed through, only people that are able to add load are going to add mode by grabbing a barbell or adding weight.

Todd:
Only people that have the capacity to squat snatch are going to squat snatch that people are gonna power snatch people that have the capacity to take the bar from the ground are gonna be taken from the ground. Some might be doing it from the hang and your teaching process presents within it. You're scaling options and you just find where somebody is at you. Let them stay there and make it challenging for them. And you can take, you know, any demographic of athlete through any workout just based on how you program it and how you deliver the teaching and all that kind of stuff. If on the flip side of that, the workout of the day is, is Amanda and it's got snatches and muscle ups and you're gonna do a 10 minute mom of four muscle ups on the minute every minute leading up to that. And then after that you're going to take 10 more minutes to build to a 1 rep, Max Snatch, and then you're going to finish with Amanda. Well, that's not left you much time to actually teach either of those movements. And yeah, people might try something and it might not be as as productive as that would have been if you would have spent, you know, 40 minutes teaching people how to do those two movements in the last ten minutes, doing a workout and then finished with some stretching or cooling down or something like that.

Ackerman:
So I guess the question that comes up a lot, though, when we talk about that is so let's Amanda's a great one. A classic girl workout at this point. It's been around. The argument is going to be from the people that are going to boot camps and and Crossfit, lite is hey. Most people either don't need to learn the snatch and or muscle. I don't want to. They want to come in and move for thirty to forty five minutes. Where do we draw that line?

Fern:
Well, I don't I don't think it has to be this black or white answer. I think you can serve both. Right. And there's there's lots of different ways to do that. You can offer a lower barrier of entry type programming without abandoning the brand. So.

Fern:
I'm clearly I'm bias on a pet peeve of mine because I feel that a lot of people are only in their business because of Crossfit,. Right. They would not have otherwise had a gym. And then they are starting to basically put in good business practices and good scaling options because it's all lower barrier programs are is appropriate scaling and then calling it something else when the reality is they just decided to improve their product and then decided that like rebranding was why it got better. And it's like, no, you rebranding had jack shit to do with it.

Fern:
You just started putting in good business principles and started coaching people and starting them at an appropriate level of training where you are not doing that before. So on that note, as you can do both, right. I can just run a well-run class because a well-run class. The assumption is always that when if I'm if I had this 60 minute program and I do 40 minutes of coaching and practice, like Todd said, the assumption for whatever reason, which is incorrect, is that that 40 minutes is fucking easy.

Fern:
It's not as. No, it's not. It is not easy, right? And that's so that is. That is my rub against that is just like if if it if that is in fact, what you're doing, you're not doing it right. Like they should be challenged in the muscle up progression, like you should be taking them through progressions and technique work on the snatch balance that is challenging if you do it correctly. Nobody in that class is complaining that they're fucking bored, you know,.

Todd:
Or that it's easy. Yeah. I mean, this happens every every every weekend. When I when we teach a level two on day two, there's a heavy day that one of us trainers takes them through. And that's the only thing the athletes do. And I can't tell you how often I see that the athletes in that class were coaches and gym owners and train Crossfit, regularly.

Todd:
By the time you get through the specific warm up, if we're doing push jerks for that day, for the heavy day, they are smoke, they're sweating profusely, they've held positions and worked harder for positions than they normally do to do during the week. And they're like, holy crap, you sure that wasn't the workout? You know, jokingly. But that's the reality of it, is if you were teaching people well and making them fight for positions and working hard, they're like they're gonna get plenty of work done before they even start adding weight to the bar on a heavy day or something like that.

Todd:
So I think, you know, you can get a workout in in that same same realm of just teaching people, practicing the movements and still, still feel like you got a workout throughout that class.

Ackerman:
So Fern this kind of reminds me, you know, during the Coach Glassman's lecture. There's a Q and A and people asked about retaining members and Russ Green chimed in. Russ Green is kind of Crossfitters head attorney, if you will, and longtime trainer as well. And.

Fern:
He's not a man. He's not an attorney, though, by the way.

Ackerman:
Ok. And he kind of. Does he?

Fern:
Yeah, he does a lot of work on on the legislative side for Coach Glassman.

Ackerman:
Smart dude. But, you know, he. The question was something along the lines of retaining those members that won more. And I think a lot of what we're discussing is boxes are almost bringing down that barrier and trying to give people what they want, not necessarily what they need. And in reality, if you look at the theoretical hierarchy that Coach Glassman created in 2002, it's nutrition, metabolic conditioning, gymnastics, weightlifting, sport. People are jumping way to the top, if not to or at least to weightlifting. So really what we're saying is, hey, you need to do Amanda and you need to do these other short workouts. But the truth is, you need this foundation first. That happens outside of the gym.

What also you in the gym as well?

Fern:
Right. But I'll let you go, Todd.

Todd:
The big piece of that like. People want what we've told them. They either need or what Crossfit, is. I like. I I still answer the call, the phone when people are calling my gym to come in and try Crossfit,. And I've never once heard a brand new person in the Crossfit, call me and go, Eh? I'm interested in trying out your gym. I'm curious, do you guys do a lift and then a met con or is there three parts to your workout? Because that's what I'm looking for. Nobody's ever said that. They call and they go, Hey, I'm looking to get in shape. I've heard Crossfit, really effective. I'm a little nervous to come in here. Do you think it's something that's appropriate for me? And they walk in my doors and I show them what Crossfit, is, which is, hey, we're gonna warm up. We're gonna spend time every single day practicing the movements and then we're gonna do this one workout.

Todd:
We're going to hit it really hard. And then that's what Crossfit, is to them. And I don't have members that complain that, hey, I wish I did more X because they're like, not Crossfitters. Whatever you showed me, it is within inside the walls of your gym. Now, on a rare occasion, we'll have people that are coming from other gyms or that have experience and maybe they. It wants most what they were exposed to and that's what they were taught somewhere else. But that's not the basis of our membership. The basis of our membership are people that are new to Crossfit, and we are delivering this product to them. And if somebody has experience and potentially wants our gym. Well, you can come in and see if it's the right fit for you. And if it's not, you know, there's no problem with that. You can find the place that works a little bit better or I can give you some extra floor space or time to do some additional stuff on your own, if that's what you want to do. But

Ackerman:
so really, it comes down to I think you kind of summed up and it comes down to two major issues going on at a box level. Either A, your community and culture is all of a sudden doing too much, whether they saw it at the games or they you have that one or two athletes that try to do too much and they want to do it. So now they're getting pulled from what they originally loved, which was just come in a hang, my friends, I get coach or they're coming from other boxes. Is that what is that what? Is that what you think Fern is really? Because these were 10 year affiliates. So they've kind of run the gamut. As all of us have we been there when it's like it's one where kind of day it's fun. It's strengthened met con on its three parts. But now we're trying to real this kind of fish back in and it's pulling hard against us.

Fern:
Well, I think the big takeaway is that collectively, all of us are. So what I don't want to be misinterpreted here is that we're like hating on people. Like, I'm definitely not. The point of this podcast used to have hard discussions that are uncomfortable, acknowledge that there is a large swath of the community that is not that is mis applying the program. Right. And that we can all collectively get better.

Fern:
And if anybody is sitting around waiting for HQ to do that for you, that is not going to happen. That has never been their intent. Like they create the program, we provide the seminars with which we teach you the program and how to apply it.

Fern:
And then from there it is on us, the community affiliate owners, the coaches, to continue to get better, which is always seeking out information, finding different ways to do that, rather than moving or gravitating towards what's easier, which is less coaching by putting more in the hour or moving to lower skill programs. Right. Like you can do that. You can do both. Two things can be true at once. I can have really, really high end coaching while offering lower, very lower barrier of entry programs to feed people into my Crossfit, program. And I can do that really well. At the same time. Right. Like you can run boot camps that are Crossfit, centric while still teaching the points performance of all the movements. And then as people get more comfortable, move them towards the barbell like that is a real thing. But I think everybody is just moving towards with easier because there is unrealistic expectation, which has never been the case, by the way, that Crossfit, is going to come in and save your gym like that's your job, right. Is to make sure that your gym is healthy and operates the way that it should.

Ackerman:
Yeah. You know, the two of us at the Affiliate gathering, the three of us have been in this call for nearly two hours and we're kind of filling Todd in on what went down and just didn't summarize what went down. Coach Glassman gave an inspiring, motivating speech. It's clear the direction of Crossfit, is to promote health, but he also believes by promoting health, boxes will grow. You're gonna get grandmas and moms to do Crossfit, as well. But at the same time, he's not going to show up at box and help you improve your box. That's what we're here for.

Fern:
And they've never said that.

Ackerman:
Yes, that un realist.

Fern:
Which is why it's confusing that people are like, ah, ah, ah, ah. Angry that they're not getting that. And that has literally never been the case.

Ackerman:
Well, I and you and I discussed it on the previous episode where it's like you're paying five hundred, maybe three thousand dollars. What do you expect? I mean, if you were like Coach Glassman, I want an hour of your time. It would be significantly more than 3000 dollars an hour.

Fern:
Chris Cooper just dropped an article about this, which is like if that is what people want and they want some sort of playbook and they want some people to Crossfit, to come in. And, you know, people throw around the term, the quality assurance program, at which point most people would get cut. You know, your Affiliate fee is not three thousand bucks anymore, it's a hundred and fifty thousand dollars to do to figure out what best practices are in sent teams around to do Q and A and do all that stuff like that.

Fern:
I don't think people understand how all of that works.

Ackerman:
Yes.

Fern:
If you like, Chick fil A is a billion dollar company. Right. And the operators that have those franchises, Chick fil A takes 50 percent of that. Right. So if that's what you want, you're going to forfeit 50 percent of your revenue.

Ackerman:
I'll throw this out there right now. I'm speaking for Fern and Todd. We will take three boxes willing to pay ten thousand dollars. You will get the three of us for two solid days at your box. We will pay for travel. We pay for everything else. And it costs you ten thousand dollars and we will make your box better. You guys are agree at that. Todd You in? Ten thousand dollars. All that it, one check. We cover our own travel and everything Todd Drive. Fern and I will fly first class. Sound about right.

Todd:
Jay we can pack you in the overhead bin. You don't even need to pay for a seat bro.

Ackerman:
How many people came up to me at the Affiliate gathering like you to hit that 50 back squats?

Todd:
And you still haven't done it.

Ackerman:
I know it wasn't that I don't want I need to just ones.

Todd:
It's that you can't take your can't. Yeah, I know what it is.

Ackerman:
I think are we working together in the next four weeks at all.

Ackerman:
I don't know how I'm going gonna be the summit. We're having the summit.

Todd:
Boom, oh, we're gonna do it at the summit. I think that.

Ackerman:
That was one of those times I spoke way.

Todd:
We'll do it at the summit in front of everybody.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I spoke too fast on that. I was a mistake right there. I should not have done that. Yes.

Todd:
Good. It's getting perfect.

Ackerman:
Everyone just for people listening. The summit is going to be everyone. Two hundred people now making fun of me while I'm squatting instead of two.

Todd:
That's gonna be epic. I'm going to send David an e-mail right now, letting him know that that's how we should kick off the summit before Coach comes in and talks to everybody. Let's have you on stage doing 50 squats.

Ackerman:
It'll be like, get the game.

Todd:
Twenty two squats.

Ackerman:
It will be like games with the kettlebells, trying to go overhead

Fern:
So I have a question for you guys on a serious note, because I've been really tryna and this question kind of came up because I was talking to the two guys that we talked to after we interviewed Coach Glassman, Jay and.

Ackerman:
Charlie and Spencer?

Fern:
We were in discussion about like such to help. Yeah.

Fern:
And why do you guys think that there's such a stigma around big knowledge thing that we as coaches and affiliate owners could and should do better? Because that is where I feel that overall community is not where people like. There's this weird, unspoken thing that is like it is a bad to acknowledge that we have shortcomings and can be significantly better. And I'm putting myself in that bucket.

Ackerman:
Todd, you a first?

Todd:
Phrase that for me, a little bit like you're just saying that we're not admitting that we can be better and so we're trying to put the onus on somebody else to come in and save our business.

Fern:
I think collectively that is where the large majority of the community sits. And I'm really trying to figure out why. Why is that the case?

Fern:
Because that is counter to everything that we that people are immersed in and indoctrinated in when they come in and they do the level 1 and the level 2, which is like there is always room for improvement. And the only way to improve is to constantly seek out.

Ackerman:
I mean, in general in life, really, at this point, I was having this conversation with my wife last night. It's like people see other things and other, you know, social media and all that and only see the good stuff, you know. So there's that whole stigma in life these days. Like no one's posting, hey, I lost three members today or so and so, you know, quit and went to another box. And in the same way we see all these other whether it's boxers or coaches or programming that are just, you know, quote unquote, killing it. And we think we need to do better. Not realizing if you have 70, 80, 100 members, you're running a pretty successful business. Like maybe instead of worrying about what other people are doing and what you can be doing, better focus on some of the things you're doing well. So I think there's there's certainly that component to it. But did you want to dive deeper than that Todd?

Todd:
No, I'm with you there like I think. Just like Fern said. I think a lot of times people we all of us struggle to look in the mirror and be like, well, the reason that things aren't going as well as I like or I want them to is because I'm not putting in the work to do that, you know? So it's on us. And if we're not doing a good job of getting people in the door, then what do we need to do? How do we how do we spread the word better? You know, I think it's on us to continually evolve and improve and figure out how to be more efficient. Whether that's learning better business practices, whether that's becoming a better coach, it's like you need to look in the mirror and figure out where you're slacking and then dive into to trying to improve that area.

Ackerman:
And I think it's low hanging to be like, well, Crossfit, harder to coach. I want to get more people in here so I can just get rid of the snatch, get rid of the clean and not do muscle ups. And now it's easier and I get more people rather than saying, hey, maybe I need to be better at coaching those movements and coaching them with multiple people. I mean, there's never a class, right? Personally, I'm going to coach today. I look at the white board and I'm like, oh, shit, I'm gonna coach that and I'm going to have, you know, so and so and so and so in class. How am I going to make that happen? I look at it. I'm like, cool. This is immediately I start to brainstorm how I'm going to do that, where I'm going to put people and use PVC or a bar where it's easy. It would be significantly easier to be like no snatches. Everyone's doing kettlebell swings.

Fern:
Yeah. And this is something. So let's assume worst case scenario that everybody thinks Crossfit, is going to kill people like which we all know it is not right. It's just not a thing. My question. Anybody who has that feeling, they're like, well, people are afraid of the brand. And my question is, what are you doing about that? Like, what are your gym? Name is not Crossfit,, period, like your gym name is Crossfit, Fife or Crossfit,. North Naples, like that is your brand. And the lack of ownership of your brand I think is the actual problem, which is like, what are you doing to promote your brand and to educate people on what you are doing inside the walls of your gym? In the vast majority, people are doing nothing other than complaining that somebody didn't hand them this perfect thing that mitigates all of peoples anxiety, like that's not a real scenario. So like if you're a gym owner or you're a coach or affiliate owner, what are you doing about that scenario? Are you producing content that shows people how you run your classes and how you guys skill athletes and that Crossfit, is for somebody who's 75? Are you highlighting those members that have done really, really well? Are you putting out coaching content? Are you putting out content that shows your community? Are you writing articles and doing podcasts and doing all that stuff in this? In the short answer is the vast majority, ninety nine point nine percent are not doing that. They're just sitting around complaining that Crossfit, didn't just bring 500 people into their gym. So now they're gonna call it whatever J's fitness. Yeah.

Ackerman:
If you think by dropping the Crossfit, and calling it right fitness, your Jay fitness, all of a sudden you're gonna go from 50 to 200 members. You're absolutely wrong. It's not the word Crossfit, that's scaring people away. It's that people are going to the Orange Theory and the Bikram yoga studios, you know, in the Baryy boot camps out there. Not necessarily because they're afraid of Crossfit, just because their friends are telling them about it. And they think it's a little bit lower, lower barrier to entry. But look, Crossfit, is doing by putting those older people on the dot com and and what coach Glassman clear as it was that's getting picked up by national news mean. If you have a member that's lost 100 pounds and you have an 80 year old woman, you should be sharing that on your social media, pushing it out there to all your members to share, because that's what's actually going to get mom to be like, oh, I can do this. I mean, the whole point, just to make it clear and, you know, paraphrasing what they said, they're the reason Coach Glassman got that set that was meant to look like on the family a set of veto. Long Island, New York is because not that he wanted people to lift water jugs at home, because he wanted people to say, well, I can do this and I will go find my local affiliate to do it. Yeah.

Ackerman:
Ya but. Go ahead, Todd.

Todd:
I just e you referenced, you know, people in your community going to these other facilities instead of your gym. And if that's the case, if you feel like you are losing some of the market share, some of your potential clients because they're going to orange theory or going to this bootcamp place, maybe there's some value in it for you to go to that specific place and see what they're doing differently. I'm pretty sure it's probably not because they don't use a barbell. And you do. It's probably because the facilities actually clean or, you know, like you you walk into a bathroom that you can actually use or you walk in and, you know, somebody greets you when you walk in the door, like, look at what they are doing differently.

Todd:
It's not the workout side, in my opinion. I'm hard pressed to think that that's the case. And more often than not, it's this experience that they get. You know, if you call orange theory, there's somebody answer the phone or call you right back. If that's not the case at your gym, it's probably not the Crossfit, name. It's probably not the barbell you're using. It's probably not that kind of stuff. It's like you guys are missing some of the experience piece and that's our job as well as to make it somebody's best hour of their day. And that that's beyond just a good, good workout for, you know, 10 or 12 minutes that you're working out in class. It's from the moment they wake up in the morning and maybe they check the app on their phone to see which your workout looks like. Is something even posted? There is their notes around that, like the experience goes well beyond just the small portion of class that includes the workout itself. There's a lot more a lot more to it. You need to be taking note of all of that stuff and seeing what you can do to improve that as well.

Fern:
And again, I think that's a perfect place to just end where we started, which is what Coach Glassman said. It's not not Crossfit, just because you decided to do it smarter.

Ackerman:
Yeah, I think everyone kind of gets wrapped up in that, you know, they're no longer doing Crossfit,. It's all still Crossfit,.

Fern:
Yeah.

Ackerman:
And I agree. Good place to end it. It just kind of made me think, you know, McDonald's at one point was the only burger spot and then probably Burger King or somebody else. So then McDonald's wasn't like, well, we're going to change something. They looked at Burger King. What can we do better? Just like when you put up and I'm sure they're like, all right, what can we gain from that and implement here? And rather than say, well, we're going to drop the McDonald's. It's like, no, we're not dropping that. We're gonna just see what we can take from these other businesses that are clearly doing it well. Orange theory is clearly doing something right. You can hate on it all you want and their classes are packed and trainers are getting paid like 50 dollars an hour. They're doing something right.

Fern:
60 or orange theory is my counter argument to everybody that says Crossfit, is too expensive. The price points are very similar and most Orange Theory do not make money until they breach the 500 member mark. So anybody who's like the market is saturated and people can't afford that. You're wrong. You are not giving out the same. You're not giving out the appropriate message. And you're not working hard enough to like expose yourself within the community. There is no shortage of people looking for fitness in orange theory will and is currently be my counter arguments. Anybody who has either of those arguments, it's not money, it's not time. It's the value that people have, which means you need to do it better.

Ackerman:
Yeah, and I can promise you orange theories aren't throwing tenure affiliate gatherings they're not having in a box parties. They're not doing cool fun Saturday events for their members. You know, they're just giving some people a subpar workout. Whats so funny Todd?

Todd:
Na I'm with you man.

Ackerman:
All right, so let's let's wrap it up there. And you know, Fern, like you said, it's not not Crossfit, just because you decided to do better. Anything else you've gathered from the affiliate gathering?

Fern:
One thing that I. It made sense when he said it. But I did. I don't know why I hadn't realized it before, as is. There is a lot of kind of. Talk around the change of the Web site at. The beginning of 2019 and Coach Glassman said so be it is it is a B2B tool, right? Well, that isn't a meeting for anybody. It isn't what I mean, it's business to business tool. So when they revamp the Web site, it was no longer for athletes or people that we're looking to train Crossfit, like the resources that are available on there or for trainers and affiliates to educate themselves to become smarter. Right. To be able to have conversations about cholesterol and diabetes and nutrition and training and levers and all of that stuff. And if you look on there, it is now very much an educational tool. Right. So for people who are like, don't read the Web site anymore, that's a massive mistake. If you're a trainer, your box on and you're not reading the.

Fern:
Because a lot of people used to go there for entertainment. Right. They used to go there for consumption of like entertaining material. And the the the subject matter of that content is now switch. It is largely educational. Right. Which is where I think everybody should. It's going to be spending a lot of ways how we get there. And so when he said that, when he said that, it made perfect sense, like, oh, of course, it's a B2B tool.

Fern:
But everybody was really confused because that's largely not what it was before. It was a BDC was that it was a business to consumer people who wanted to train Crossfit, or wanted to purchase seminars and stuff like that. But when you look at it now, you're like, OK, that makes more sense. This is now a tool for me to use to use those resources and somehow improve my job.

Ackerman:
Yeah. And I mean, it was very clear from the affiliate gathering that there's a there's a plan that goes into the Web site, you know, weeks and months in advance, not just for the programming, but for the content that gets picked up from the cooking videos to the articles that are getting there to even the art. So like like you've said, it's not meant for people that go there and necessarily do Crossfit, anymore, but it's meant for you guys as affiliate owners to go there and learn. And if you're not taking advantage of that, it's probably because it's over your head and you're not smart enough to grasp what Coach Glassman is putting out there.

Fern:
Well, which which is a lot of us.

Ackerman:
Yeah. Oh, yeah. I mean, you know, I joked about it, but I was serious when we were talking and me a Fern and I sat down with him at one point he was talking and I was just like, I don't know what he's talking about. He's lost me. I hope for I in my mind is like, I hope Fern is following this. Luckily luckily, you were the mark of the good. The mark of a smart business man is teaming up with someone smarter than him.

Fern:
I'm glad that you've acknowledged that I'm the smart one.

Ackerman:
In some in some capacities. Luckily, we both teamed up with Todd. I think that's why I hope that's it.

Ackerman:
And things going over your heads, that that's nothing new for you, right? That is that I don't.

Todd:
I'm not only mentally but also physically uh.

Ackerman:
I'll what's going to go over my head, One Eighty five after I hit my fiftieth rep and I throw it in the air.

Todd:
You're going to crush to the ground and that's going just smash you down into the floor. That's gonna be fantastic.

Ackerman:
Jerk. The last rep right over my head was Well Todd. Let let let's wrap it up with this is someone that wasn't at the Affiliate gathering. You've been around around 10 years. What was your take from afar? From what I've taken, it said to you about it from talking to other friends. What's your stance on where Crossfit, is right now?

Todd:
Where Crossfit, is now, you know, it's an interesting place, but it's that it's changing, it's move in a slightly different direction. But, you know, I can remember years ago being like, hey, this stuff isn't necessarily built for like the three of us guys that are athletic and that would even without Crossfit,, we would still be active.

Todd:
We would still be fit. We'd still be working out. This program is better designed for people like my mom, which I was lucky enough to get to start doing this in 2009. So I'm I'm excited about the fact that it's moving in a direction to where it's actually targeting and marketing towards those people because they get way more value in going from having an inability to squat, to being able to do multiple reps and to do it with weight. Whereas compared to us, that can go from what you're four minute and forty five second frame time now to like a four minute and 40 second Fran time with sixty five pounds of jumping pull ups, you would be making that kind of progress anyway. So I think it's pretty cool the direction it's going. It'll be interesting to see where it continues to evolve and go to. But I'm excited to see that.

Ackerman:
I'll wrap this up. I have two challenges that you kind of made me think of. One would be, if you're listening to this and either your mom or someone in line with who your mom and your mom passed away or share any does Crossfit,, but someone in line would think that kind of demographic is not doing Crossfit,. Sit down with them and find out why my mom doesn't do Crossfit,. I should go sit down with her and say OK, mom, what is it about Crossfit, that scares you? You know she does her water aerobics. So what is it about Crossfit,? And bonus would be if you can convince them to do it. And then secondly, you know what Coach Glassman said they're they're working on right now is they're doing a lot of free Crossfit, for what he termed, you know, obese and old people,.

Fern:
The underserved population,.

Ackerman:
Underserved population considers doing that at your box. If I had a box right now, I would have two hours a week, if not three, maybe dedicated to free Crossfit, to the underserved people that were you know, I would come up with my criteria for being obese and old and it would probably just look something like, your life is not enjoyable right now. And I can make it better. And I would do it for absolute free. No money expected. And I would tell them, I'm going to use you guys, I'm going to film the shit out of you guys and blast it to show the local population what we're doing now. We're trying to get news coverage. I would try to get them to talk about it. I would make them take before and after pictures if you're not doing that at your box. I think you're doing your local population a disservice. Silence, radio silence. My good, we ended there. Hey, guys, you guys good? I like it. Yup. All right. So let let's leave it there. We'll continue to have this discussion and give questions on and of course, reach out to us. But. Hopefully that helps. I know a lot of times we have discussions and we're kind of like going on all over the place with it, I hope that we landed on something valuable to the listeners.

Fern:
Yeah, I think so, even if it's just some, you know, reflection.

Ackerman:
And like we said, ten thousand dollars gets the three of us to your box. Fern and I first class Todd back in Coach. Fern and I got our own room. Todd, you get a hostile.

Todd:
Yes, I know why you guys want your own together. I think we discussed that beforehand. So you guys can have that that shared room.

Ackerman:
That was separate rooms. Bet.

Todd:
I went full size throughout the solo hostel, and that's fine. Perfect.

Ackerman:
I we're joking about this, but for real. They get the box. I know that sounds like a lot of money. It's going to cost money for the three of us to travel there. We're gonna give you two full days. Well, I think that would be immensely valuable to a box to have us there. We'll film some stuff. We'll put content out for you. We didn't come out here to pitch that. But now it's out there. So. All right. We're wrapping up best our other day. We will be back. Thanks, guys, for listening.

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