89. Bethanie Werner | CrossFit Kapaa

89. Bethanie Werner | CrossFit Kapaa

View this post on Instagram

Buff babes on the beach!

A post shared by CrossFit Kapaa (@crossfitkapaa) on

In this episode, Fern sits down with Bethanie Werner. Owner of CrossFit Kapaa on the island of Oahu discuss the positives of owning a box that gets many drop-ins over the year. She also owner Crossfit Sany in Utah. Bethanie also breaks down what it’s like taking over a box and having to work 80 of coach per month to keep the lights on, her plans for the future. She is a 10-year affiliate owner with a wealth of knowledge on how to make her business work for her. Hostnehly so many knowledge bombs dropped in this episode. From having GM, putting members on contacts, how to make it all work.

Side note Bethanie is looking for a coach at her box, pop over to the gym page and slide in those dm’s.

Timestamps: 

(3:54) Owning two boxes 

(5:45) Buying a new box

(15:08) How to move members on to contacts/prices increase

(28:00) Small box logistics 700 square foot.

(41:23) Being a better coach 

(44:33) Central Nervous System Fatigue 

(53:53) Being part of the Mentorship group. 

Social media: 

@bethaniewerner

@crossfitkapaa

http://crossfitkapaa.com/

We value your feedback. After listening, please hit me up with any questions, comments, or thoughts on how we can make this show even better, and if you enjoyed it, please share it!

Instagram; @besthouroftheirday

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman

Rate/subscribe in Apple Podcasts!

Bethanie Werner.mp4 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Bethanie Werner.mp4 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2019.

Fern:
All right, everybody, welcome back to the best hour of their day. Fern here, Bethany Werner. All right. We are in Whistler, Canada. We just basically wrapped up the 10 year affiliate gathering. So she was here for that as well. Would you think of the weekend?

Bethanie Werner:
It was amazing.

Fern:
Yeah, I really dug the fact that it was like super loose schedule. So it was it was the opposite of everything else that is Crossfit,, which is like tight timelines. Got things to do. Do a lot of stuff. This was a lot of eating.

Bethanie Werner:
And drinking.

Fern:
And a lot of drinking and a lot of downtime. And and then a little bit of, you know, kind of interaction with coach and stuff like that. And would you think about is his talk yesterday?

Bethanie Werner:
I'm so hyped up, so motivated again. It was. It is exactly what I needed at this point.

Fern:
In what way? And I ask that because I think a lot of people there's some obvious, obvious skepticism rolling around the community. And so you said you feel awesome, which I think a lot of people are now intrigued as to why.

Bethanie Werner:
I'm coming up on 10 years in Crossfit,, so I've seen it take different iterations over the years and I definitely got caught up in the competition for a while and it felt like a kick in the stomach a year ago when they changed that very abruptly. And as a master's athlete, they changed what we were doing as well.

Fern:
What age group you're in the 40 to?

Bethanie Werner:
40 to 45? Yeah, 43. Got it.

Fern:
OK.

Bethanie Werner:
But over the last year, to see how things actually worked out in practice, it was great. I loved watching the games.

Fern:
Did you watch the whole weekend or most that

Bethanie Werner:
I streamed, nearly every bit of it. You know,.

Thats cool. And most people know that and we talked about it a little bit. But the the game or the broadcasts of the games was broadcast more widely by a significant margin than it has ever been broadcast. So it was like it was readily available to virtually anybody that wanted to watch it. I was like one hundred some crazy unknown amount of entities took the stream and broadcast. It was crazy.

Bethanie Werner:
So choice to watch the rogue feed and it was.

Fern:
The best one quality.

Bethanie Werner:
The quality was fantastic. It felt like the old games broadcast.

Fern:
Yeah, that's cool.

Bethanie Werner:
Maybe even better.

Fern:
OK. And then so back to the. So for those of you who don't know. So the this gathering in Whistler, Canada was for affiliates that have been around for 10 plus years. Not everybody was right on 10 years. I think there was like 30 that were going to hit 10 years before the end of 2019. I think that I think the numbers I think I saw on Morning Chalk Up was like 800 affiliates that meet that mark of which I think 200 plus were here. So I think that's pretty bad ass to get a quarter of the affiliates that were your starters that are still around that are. I think that's awesome. I thought it was like Crossfit, of oldthere was like it felt very 2008, 2007, a lot of like old faces. And just it's really cool to see people around. But. I thought his talk was great. So he spoke for us for that. Obviously, guys, we're here, but he's. Combined him talking in Q and A was three hours. So tell me a little bit about what you thought about it.

Bethanie Werner:
It reminded me why we're doing this. It were there for the members were making people's lives better. We're not here to do the 300 pound snatch and to win the Crossfit, games. That's why my gym is open. That's why I wake up in the morning super energized. And now I'm just extra energized going back, taking that with me.

Fern:
That's cool. So if anybody who won't like spoiler alert here. So he did open his talk with like and I think he kind of just popped those those skepticism balloons. He was he was like, there is no crisis. The company's not going public or anything like that. Everything's fine. It's just change. And we all know how people feel about change, particularly if you own an affiliate. You know how people feel about change, which kind of leads to some of things we have talked about is you have two affiliates.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes.

Fern:
That are not co-located.

Bethanie Werner:
Not Even close.

Fern:
Yeah. So, tell me it's all about. Tell us about that. So you have one in Hawaii and then your other one is?

Bethanie Werner:
Crossfit,. Sandy in Sandy Uatah tells me first affiliate. We just reached our 10 year couple of weeks ago. So I'm here at this event. And then an opportunity came up at the end of 2018 for me to buy Crossfit, Kappa on the island of Oahu. And I took that over on January 1st.

Fern:
How does that how how do you get presented with a purchase of a business? Not in the continental United States.

Bethanie Werner:
Honestly, it was the affiliate owners group on Facebook.

Fern:
Where all good things happen.

Bethanie Werner:
It was Halloween morning and the post popped up and I took a screenshot of it and sent it to my husband, who is on a business trip and said, fun, daydreaming. Right. And he responded, you can do this and we're doing it.

Fern:
That's cool. So you and you've been there and that acquisition was final. And how long have you been there?

Bethanie Werner:
I flew out on December 30th, taught my first class in the morning, the thirty first.

Fern:
And so you're coming up on a year ish.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah.

Bethanie Werner:
How's it been so far? So much better than I could have imagined.

Fern:
That's great.

Bethanie Werner:
It wasn't wasn't as hard as I thought. The community was more welcoming and the the benefits, the drop ins and the landscape and just everything about that place is fantastic.

Fern:
So obviously, you want to give numbers here, but I do think the discussion of a purchase or an acquisition comes up fairly regularly in the Crossfit, community here and in a lot of people do them very, very differently. But how was that negotiation and process for you? Was it painful? Was it messy? What? How did how did it kind of go?

Bethanie Werner:
It was fairly easy. It was a series of few emails to tell the truth, really. We had one phone conversation, sent some emails with follow up questions. Then I basically took the inventory list, sent it to Rogue and said, what would it cost? I was going to buy this equipment new and get it shipped to Hawaii animated offer based on what the equipment was worth.

Fern:
Did you go buy? You went on. You presented your offer based on new equipment.

Bethanie Werner:
I use that to inform my decision. I depreciate it.

Fern:
Got it. Okay. And then just out of curiosity, do you mind that like I know generally what re what resale equipment would go for and it's generally not 50 percent of what new would be.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah,.

Fern:
I just sold a bunch of stuff from one of our other facilities and there are some there are things that that maintain value rowers bikes probably 60 to 70 percent of their not everything else like 50 percent immediately. Like the day that you purchase it like a car. It is like it's a bad investment if you're trying to resell it. So so be. Now, did you. Was that basically all the purchase went down like you bought the. So there's a couple different scenarios. If a business is profitable, then I'm doing some sort of multiple of income or if it's not, generally what you're doing is you're essentially just buying their equipment and assuming a lease and memberships. Is that.

Bethanie Werner:
Basically what I did, Yeah.

Fern:
Yeah. Which is unfortunately really the vast majority of purchases in the Crossfit, community. And I say unfortunately, because that just means that largely people are not running like a super profitable businesses, which is kind of the point of this podcast that things are trying to change so that people can propel. What the the purpose of this podcast, I think, is that we do is to continue to push the community forward in coaching in business, and there's a lot of people doing it in business. But then in our experience and we'll I'll let you speak about this a little bit is like the coaching community is largely what I. Get the sense is is starved. Information was so OK, so you still have your your other facility and you're in Ouha and then so you're coaching the vast majority of classes at this point.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah, it's a light schedule. We have four classes a day plus two hours of open gym and I cover all but five hours per week.

Fern:
OK.

Bethanie Werner:
And if anybody needs time off, then I cover those other five hours, too.

Fern:
How many other coaches you have?

Bethanie Werner:
Three.

Fern:
OK, so they don't coach a ton?

Bethanie Werner:
No.

Fern:
Do it. Is that part time for them? They obviously do something else.

Bethanie Werner:
OK, yeah. Just passion for them that they coach.

Fern:
Got it. Do you have a plan too? I don't want to say remove yourself, but work out of that 80 hour coach classes a month deal.

Bethanie Werner:
I had a plan. It hasn't gone as planned. I thought that I'd moved to the island. Get to know people, recruit some coaches that weren't coaching. I just figured in a community like that, there'd be any talent available and there hasn't been to date. So now that Plan B is start to develop with it from within, which is going to be a slower process, but probably yield an outcome that I'm more comfortable with in the long run.

Fern:
I'll give you plan C. We're putting it out right now on the podcast if you want to move to Hawaii and coach Crossfit, Crossfit, Kappa is looking for a head coah.

Fern:
Which I think. Obviously, there's two scenarios I can develop my coaches within or I can pull them from the outside. And I think that. People are. And I get it right, so it's it's. Crossfit,. And a lot of ways we think we're unique. However, we are not and in many, many, many ways that people get real weird about bringing somebody from the outside in to kind of, I want to say take over and shepherd your your herd, but kind of. Yeah, right. But there are some really good coaches there over the outside that would like that would do that. And we talked about this on I think was a coach compensation podcast with Todd that they're there. There is a scenario where you absolutely could do that and suddenly are like there are absolutely great candidates to do that. So if you're interested, hit us up. We'll hand you off. Then he can do an interview with you and then and then she can get some of her time back. What's been the biggest struggle from on the business side? Because you are now. One hundred percent removed from your now 10 year affiliate.

Bethanie Werner:
The biggest struggle is ensuring that my values are continued even when I'm multiple thousands of miles away.

Fern:
Do you have a GM at the other spot?

Bethanie Werner:
I do. I got incredibly lucky. This is really what's made the second gem a possibility for me. A co-owner of a gym out of Miami got married. His wife got a job in Utah. They moved up to Utah. He sold out of his other gym.

Fern:
Okay.

Bethanie Werner:
That was.

Fern:
Kind of a dream scenario. Oh, yeah. Super experienced coach, great energy, super knowledgeable, as though he coached for me for six months.

Bethanie Werner:
And then this opportunity presented itself to buy the second gym. So I went home and said, would you be interested in it? Because if he hadn't been interested, I went to take the next step.

Fern:
But interesting. So you. I mean, that's kind of how it should work. So you had the GM in place before this came up. This wasn't. You didn't get a GM in a reactionary fashion to having this opportunity come up.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes, it did.

Fern:
OK. OK. That's great. That's what you should. A lot of people, including myself, have done it backwards, so. And I regretted it afterwards. That was a mistake. So. OK. And then how much? How much? So I'm I. This is a selfish question for me. How do you manage that GM from afar?

Fern:
What's the time difference there, four?

Bethanie Werner:
Depends on of it's daylight savings or not. But currently four hours, sometimes three hours.

Fern:
Okay. Okay. So what kind of what is the communication like? Right. So there are people that are considering opening another gym. Most of them are gonna be co-located in the same region or city. How are you keeping tabs to ensure that your value still exists within a gym? Like what is that management look like for you?

Bethanie Werner:
It's a lot of communication via text and email. Um, periodic phone calls, but we're both more typing kind of people than talking to us. So we touch base on a lot of things. And then when I am in town, we sit down. We spend a lot of time together. I spend every minute I can in the gym getting the vibe, talking to the members, getting feedback from everyone. Um, you've got cameras in the gym, too, so I can.

Fern:
You're spying. That's good. Listen, I'm not above any of that.

Bethanie Werner:
We've had a couple robberies facility, so that was the original reason that we installed them. But it it's nice to be able just turn it on and see, you know, the gym actually got cleaned. When it is supposed to get cleaned, things look safe.

Fern:
Yeah. Do you guys have any set kind of battle rhythm with regard to meetings that guys do like, or do you check in with him on specific days for specific things?

Bethanie Werner:
We started out that way, but now it's become more as needed. It works out to be about every other week. Okay, as far as verbal communication.

Fern:
Yeah. And then I'll load assuming you have some form of communication. Almost daily.

Bethanie Werner:
A couple times a week. Okay. He's good. He's really quite independent.

Fern:
That's great. Yeah. And then how much of the business is he manage? So because this is always a question that comes up is like, well, do does he. What do they get to see all the finances like how does all of that work? Like people get real freaked out about that.

Bethanie Werner:
I Self control, the finances. He's not working on that part. He's the member experience he brings on new clients, chases down the leads, coaches throughout the day, managers, coaching schedules, does all the programming.

Fern:
And then the other question people would have is. And there's. I don't I actually don't think there's a right or wrong. I just think it depends. For as far as compensation it when you brought him on, was that. Did you guys agree upon a salary or is he paid hourly or percentage based for programs is up like that?

Bethanie Werner:
That's changed actually since we started even since the first of the year. Initially it was going to be on a per class basis and then a flat amount for administrative tasks and. It wasn't terribly satisfied with that and we had some negotiating going on. About five months into the process and now he has a flat salary and I'm proud to say we're paying him a living wage now.

Fern:
That's fantastic. I mean, it puts you in the very small minority as far as Crossfit,. I can do that. How has the gym gone? Have you seen growth? Has it been steady? Like, are you pretty happy with it?

Bethanie Werner:
We had a massive culture change last summer in that he pushed hard for putting members on contracts which we had never done before. And philosophically, it was really hard to persuade me that it was a value to the gym and to the members. But we've done that. There is a little bit of attrition when we initially did that. But small. I'm talking like 5 percent.

Fern:
Maybe so. Let's talk about that, right? So there's two for anybody that hasn't had this conversation or doesn't understand. There were just weird Crossfit, gym owners or weird. We're far too nice. That is a very much far more mental. Probably correct. Philosophical. Wrestling match, then it is just like to actually do it right. So I'm genuinely curious. How did you switch your mindset? How did you get to the point? How were you wrestled over the other side? Like, alright, let's do it. I'm I'm good.

Bethanie Werner:
We talked about it in terms of what it would allow us to do as an organization instead of just having Crossfit, wod. We were able to broaden the schedule, introduce some open gym, some specialty classes like an OCR specialty class, a lower skill Crossfit,.

Fern:
Whats OCR?

Fern:
Obstacle course racing.

Fern:
Got it.

Bethanie Werner:
Lots of folks that are into the Tough Mudder is the Spartans. It was a prep program from them.

Fern:
Do you guys have I mean, wouldn't you guys have a special equipment for them?

Bethanie Werner:
We've had that. I've always been kind of into strong man stuff. I used to do the summer of Strong Man, so I bought from an event a bunch of leftover sandbags, slice tires, all those sorts of things.

Fern:
Ok, and then as far as like allowing you to do that, I'm assuming that we're talking about I have for the most part, guaranteed revenue. Is that what we're talking about?

Bethanie Werner:
Yes.

Fern:
OK. What was your hesitation? Why didn't why didn't you want to do?

Bethanie Werner:
Because I was a of the old school thought. You know, if we're excellent, they'll stay. I'm going to be so good. Nobody's going to want to leave. And. Yeah, that does just doesn't play out in reality.

Fern:
So talk about that a little bit because I, myself included, we all take. We all think worst case scenario is that reality is if you look at all your members like most. I mean, assuming you don't really suck, they're all gonna be there for at least a year. Right. So do you guys. Me. So this is the I'm gonna put you on the spot here. Do you guys have. Did you do any price changes when you put a contract or did you just take everybody, move them over? Same price point, but a month ago.

Bethanie Werner:
We increase the price.

Fern:
Oh,.

Bethanie Werner:
Not substantially, but ten dollars a month was the very lowest rate. Ten dollars more than what they had paying. Been paying would be the lowest rate.

Fern:
Okay.

Bethanie Werner:
And that was with a one year commitment.

Fern:
So we did. What kind of pushback did you get from the members ?

Bethanie Werner:
Very little. I was shocked. And the questions that I did get were surprising.

Fern:
Like, what?

Bethanie Werner:
Can you ensure that will retain the same staff that will have our coaches that we love?

Fern:
That's a legit question,.

Bethanie Werner:
But a great question. And that that was what they were concerned about was wonderful.

Fern:
That's almost like cheating. Meaning that. That's a super easy response in the sense that your response is because we're doing this. I can now guarantee that with the exception of some crazy stuff happening, but you're like, absolutely, that's why we're doing it. And then I go, Oh, OK, cool. Bring it up when we raised. When we raise our prices. A couple years ago, there was a handful of people that we did like a six month roll up because the price increase was going to be pretty substantial for them because I had been with us for eight years when we were doing stupid stuff with regard to pricing before that. And. Nothing I would tell anybody who's getting ready to go through some sort of contract conversion or price increase that. 5 percent would be a massive. Loss of membership, meaning like 5 percent of your base leaves because you do this. That would be an incredible. Number, like most the time is less than 1 percent. And if you do the math. You say you still come out net positive because you brought the price up and you lost two people who. Reality is we're probably going to leave anyway because they're probably your number one groupers, complainers or just people like that. So that's awesome. And then so what? What kind of do that process look like? So talk to you about the communication of that, because that's super important.

Bethanie Werner:
It was a soft rollout initially we started talking about in classes frequently and then there was an official notice. About a month and a half before it was going to take place. And we kept talking about it and talking about it, sending e-mails saying you need to pick your commitment level. And then we got down to the wire and there's still people not making the commitment. So we said, if you say nothing. This is what we're going to do. We're gonna put you in the lowest rate possible. You'll get a one year term unless you tell me otherwise.

Fern:
And then there are people that just did no communication and you switched them over.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes. Luckily, this check in system that we use, if they haven't signed a contract yet, it would pop up with the contract and force them to sign it before they were able to check in for their next class.

Fern:
Okay. And then what? What CRM do you use your checking system? And you can just move that lever,.

Bethanie Werner:
Push press.

Fern:
Okay. Do you like it?

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah.

Fern:
Okay. Um, I know quite a few people that use it. Um, do you use it? No, it's not. What else do you cause? You can't just use push brush. Right?

Bethanie Werner:
Sugar wide.

Fern:
That's what I thought. You have to use them paired together. Yeah.

Bethanie Werner:
They work really nicely together.

Fern:
Okay. Okay. And then. Do you know what the number was that you lost and that conversion? If you don't,.

Bethanie Werner:
It's one I would guess it was about three people.

Fern:
And which is a joke.

Bethanie Werner:
And sometimes you lose people just because you communicated with them. They've haven't been in for a while. Its billing them every month and the email that catches their attention is what that causes them to cancel finally. And I think that was more the case.

Fern:
So this is gonna sound really terrible. So I've had. Conversations with gym owners and I don't know I don't know what your frequency. Of communication is with your member base, like whether it's social media, email, in-person text, phone call, whatever, that are hesitant to do things like change prices, change merchant processors because of fear that these people who are not showing up. Are gonna quit when you have to reach out to them and tell them that they change their payment information. Right. And to me and like, well, I feel like we've identified a problem is that maybe you need to get these people in the gym. But what? Did you have any of that with regard? I don't like what? With what frequency do you like? So I'm a big fan of like we are not an out of sight, out of mind, a gym. Like you're gonna get no less than two pieces of communication from me on a weekly basis. If you want to unsubscribe, then that's completely up to you. But I'm not gonna be like you're in and then you never hear from me again. So like, how do you guys do it?

Bethanie Werner:
We do a lot of our communication through SugarWod of announcements feature there. So when they log in to look at the work out, that's when they're going to see a lot of the communication for things that are not super formal.

Fern:
Does sugarwod do you know? Do they push notifications to the clients? Meaning like, will they get a notification on their phone? Or do they have to? Is that like a pastor where they have to go in and actually look at it?

Bethanie Werner:
It's a push, but you can turn it off.

Fern:
Okay. Personally, I would like to see far more push notifications within some of those CRM. Because I think that with the ability with people that have the ability to turn it off. Another one that's super annoying for me. Like Wodify I if you're listening, which I don't know if you are, but having people have to automatically opt in to S M S or text function within a lot of is incredibly annoying. It should be the other way around, like they've opted in for my service. They've said I can communicate with them. It's ridiculous that I have to, like, track people down to be like. Can you opt in for text messaging so that when the gym is closed, you get the text messages? And I sent anout that. So. Yeah. Anyway, sorry. That was my intention. Just complete annoyance with wodfy in some sense. But OK, so then what is. What's your timeline? Or do you have a timeline as far as like so you're coaching how many classes a month right now? Roughly.

Bethanie Werner:
80 ish.

Fern:
So for those of you that don't go your that is a shit load of glasses.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes, there's a lot.

Fern:
I've done. I did about a six month period where I did no less than 80, but probably averaged north of one hundred a couple of years ago after I let one of my head coaches go. And that is brutal. And I don't mean brutal in the sense that like I don't like to coach, I mean brutal in the sense that that is emotionally exhausting. Right.

Bethanie Werner:
Teaching a class is a performance. You lay it all out there, you give them everything you've got, and then you have to go and re energize somehow.

Fern:
Particularly if you're doing them back to back. Now, you guys have a little bit I don't say like a leaner schedule, but you said you have four classes a day and then two hours of open gym. That's about six hours. So what do those classrooms look like?

Bethanie Werner:
6:00 a.m., open gym from 7 to 9, 9 a.m. 445 and 6 p.m..

Fern:
You got a decent gap in the middle of the day.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes.

Fern:
If you open up classrooms in there, would you get. Would you get more? I.

Bethanie Werner:
Don't think so.

Fern:
Just Because of population.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah, local members are working and tourists are. Touring, yeah. Drinks with little umbrellas in them.

Fern:
Okay. So on that note, as far as 80, how long you been maintaining that workload?

Bethanie Werner:
Since the first of the year.

Fern:
Ok.

Bethanie Werner:
With a couple I had some guest coaches come out.

Fern:
Yeah.

Bethanie Werner:
Um, some good friends have come out for three or four weeks and run the gyms. I could go back to Utah and check in there.

Fern:
So lets about that. How do you do that?

Bethanie Werner:
We're lucky that the facility has a studio apartment attached to it, so it's the best commute ever. And I tried to set it up basically like A, An air B and B for coaches. So it's fully stocked, it's clean, it's ready for them to use and they can come and stay. Teach the classes. Go have fun during the day. And then they keep the place running for me.

Fern:
What is your vetting process? So I know somebody is listening to this. I would literally pack my shit go to Hawaii.

Bethanie Werner:
To date, it's only been people I know really well. For example, a coach that worked for me for five years before moving across the country. People have coach for me at my gym in Utah. And then the most recent was friends of another gym owner. People who had guest coach for him.

Fern:
Got it. Would you be open to having like, obviously you have to vet them and make sure they're complete turds. But if you vet going about them, what would it look like? Try to help you out here, Bethanie.

Bethanie Werner:
Thank you. Yeah. That's going on my to do list. A proper vetting procedure because it's been personal relationships thus far.

Fern:
OK, so this is something. And I don't know when we're gonna release this podcast, but I did one with the barbell jobs guy and a lot of what we talked about is like coaches. The vast majority don't have an actual resumé, meaning the resume consists of. I like Crossfit,, which is not an actual f*ckinh resume. Like that is still a thing. There's still a thing. And that would be the first piece of the vetting process, which is like I have a resume. I have been working in this gym. These are my professional credentials. These are my references, at which point you can you can start that process without even having to talk to them and then reach out as people and figure that out. But would you be open to having some people come out there?

Bethanie Werner:
Absolutely.

Fern:
Because I'm pretty sure. So what's the long as you've had somebody guest coach for you? One month. That's a long time.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah.

Fern:
And then what do they have to cover basic just travel to get out there.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes.

Fern:
And then I'm assuming there is compensation involved with that.

Bethanie Werner:
There hasn't so far because it's been my friends.

Fern:
Got it. Okay.

Bethanie Werner:
But they have. They were driving my car. They're staying in my house.

Fern:
They basically get up there for a vacation. Yeah. They get a month long vacation in Hawaii. I feel like I'm not a huge barter or trade person, but I feel like that would be a fair trade.

Bethanie Werner:
I hope so, and our community is something special out there. You know, even here I ran into a pair of friends at the 10 year affiliate gathering who had been out at my gym for about 10 days and they were there in February. And they're asking by name how so? And so do I. What about her? What about him? And not just what they're doing in the gym, but their lives like they got to know some special people there.

Fern:
That's really cool. And then how big is your community and why? Like as far as your Crossfit,,.

Bethanie Werner:
Maybe 40 members.

Okay, so it's nice and tight. Okay, that's great. What's the what's the max what's the max kind of capacity you feel like you could have there? Like could you grow to two or three hundred people or. No, not enough people.

Bethanie Werner:
If we added more classes throughout the day, if they were spread out at different times, certainly we could do that. We have had classes of 15 people and our 700 square foot gym. That's the trick.

Fern:
Yeah. That is it. So talking about your space. Right. So that's it. That's always another one. So seven hundred square feet. So for those of you who are not big on square footage, it's not big. Now it's considerably smaller than most Crossfit,. I'm trying to think of whatever square if b e would be.

Fern:
Well, there is no video version of that. But it's not big. What does that look like? So what challenges do you have from a coaching standpoint? Let's dive into coaching every second. What? What are your biggest challenges with regard to space and logistics? But you have to navigate in your gym specifically.

Bethanie Werner:
I have to program to the space, without a doubt. You know, double unders are definitely a trick for us to program because that takes up a good amount of space. If they're barbells on the floor, it just doesn't happen.

Fern:
Got it.

Bethanie Werner:
Even box jumps, that gets to be a little bit tricky. So last week we had a workout with biking, rowing, double unders. And I picked Thursday because that's typically our slowest day of the week. A lot of times I'll have two or three people per class. 6:00 a.m. I've got eight. Oh, shit.

Fern:
Yeah. Okay. So what are some of the things that you've done with regard to the programming that have helped you mitigate that? So for I'd ask this question, is there a lot of this came up recently? I think it was at a level you know, was at a level two. I didn't Kansas City and somebody was like, well, what if I have this? And if you've not been coaching a long time and you've not had to be really efficient with your space in your time line, like you're not forced to be creative in these scenarios or what are some of the creative things that you've learned to do with regard to that? In order to facilitate a 15 person class in a 700 square foot facility,.

Bethanie Werner:
Dumbbells take up a lot less space than barbells. That's the first thing to look at, sending them outside to run instead of using a biker rowing machine. Sometimes we do have to go to a partner workout or an alternating mom or something along those lines.

Fern:
All very simple, none of which really change the stimulus of the workout. That's like the first thing that I hear when you tell me that. And I don't know why more people don't do that. Probably myself included. So like we tend to not make that quick distinction of, OK, a barbell takes up, we'll call it roughly. So it's seven and you gotta go to three that you have roughly 20 square feet, right, for a barbell. Right. Not a dumbbell. A dumbbell takes up about eight square feet because I don't need enough room to stand and hold onto two dumbbells. But I can still for the most part, right. If it's a metco, I can still get roughly the same loading. Right. So if it's one hundred thirty five pound, you might go 55 to 60 pound dumbbells and even 60 would be at pretty aggressive because that's not a one to one transfer by the way, meaning for those you don't know. What I mean is that let's use like Fran, if you if you've done Fran with a barbell at ninety five pounds and most people would just go okay well, just do like fifty pound dumbbells and go to one hundred. That is not the same. Like it is significantly more difficult to do. Fran even though it's only five additional pounds with two dumbbells than it is to do with an 85 pound barbell. So it is generally a lower weight by something to the tune of about 10 to 15 percent anyway. So you can swap out dumbbells and significantly reduce the space required to do the same workout and kind of make it harder.

Bethanie Werner:
For sure.

Fern:
Yeah. So anything else besides those besides those ideas?

Bethanie Werner:
I've gotten good at the programming and picking which days to bring things in literally to date. So I've been there since January 1st. There is one day in one class where doubleunder were included. I had to say, I'm sorry, we just can't jump there. Twelve of you in the room.

Fern:
The. Do you generally have a backup plan with regard to that, meaning like, if I was gonna make this a partner or work out, this is what I would do immediately?

Bethanie Werner:
Yes, I generally do have a backup plan and I also have tertiary plans for if this person is there and that person is there because my regulars need particular modifications. I put the bikes in the lobby some days.

So how big is your lobby?

Bethanie Werner:
I have not measured that. I would guess 250, 300 square feet.

Fern:
But that's not included in your. So you have a seven on every square foot of working space.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes. Talking about working space.

Fern:
Got it. OK. I was gonna say if you just chopped off and I was like, OK, that changes things significantly. Where have we now have 500 square feet? All right. And then do you. Is that retail space? Or were.

Bethanie Werner:
Yupe check in retail. There's a cute little tiki hut for the kids to play on.

Fern:
That's cool.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah.

Fern:
And then where your space is located, what kind of property is that? Is that retails at warehouse or what is it?

Bethanie Werner:
It's retail.

Fern:
OK.

Bethanie Werner:
We share the building with that. Ouha nuts. So the best smelling neighbors ever, they roast these delicious smelly nuts. And then adult novelty store right next door to us called Hush.

Fern:
Nuts and adult novelty. I like it.

Bethanie Werner:
We all specialize in creating salty nuts.

Fern:
There you go. That's your tagline. I really hope that's on your website. What kind of nut so they roast there? Everything?

Bethanie Werner:
Wide variety of macadamia almonds. I don't even know. Honestly, I don't shop there because I'm afraid of to start eating. I'll never stop.

Fern:
That's a good point. Like Brazil, nuts are like that, like Brazil. Brazil, nuts and macadamia nuts. Just eat them all day long. And a macadamia nut. For those of you zone nerds is one block of fat. So yeah, another tidbit of useless information really rattling around in my brain.

Fern:
Do you do the programming?

Bethanie Werner:
I did up until two months ago and I finally broke down and started, to use Comptrain.

Fern:
Their class version, though, right? Was it okay?

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah.

Fern:
So how do you like it?

Bethanie Werner:
It's good stuff. And for the price. I cannot write my own programming in quality coaches notes for what they're charging.

Fern:
Is their coach's notes. Is that a lesson plan or is it just like stimulus notes and stuff like that?

Bethanie Werner:
No, it's very detailed lesson plan.

Fern:
I've never used it, that's why I ask.

Bethanie Werner:
With in SugarWod while the feature is called. Coaches notes where they guide.

Fern:
Okay. And then. So let me ask you this. Do you. How closely do you and your coaches follow the coaches notes?

Bethanie Werner:
I would say I adhere to it. Perhaps 80 percent.

Fern:
What causes you to deviate? Not 20 percent space or just time?

Bethanie Werner:
Honestly, it's my experience as a coach. I have particular ways of teaching things that I like. I may use theirs once or twice and then decide I like my way better or just to add a little variety to it.

Fern:
I like it. We we used on warm up and workout for probably a little over a year. And that's because I trust and know Pat Barber and I am very confident the product they produce. But we regularly, regularly deviated. But I learned a lot by using their stuff because he would program things that I would probably never program because I just didn't like it or didn't want to do it. But I take what I did not do in that time frame as I did not change the programming at all unless it was just literally a piece of equipment we didn't have. For whatever reason. But I forced myself to not play with it. And I think we run a better gym and I have a better knowledge of programming because of that, because generally we're all biased. And if I'll change it, not because it's not a good workout or as it won't give me a good stimulus or won't make my athletes fitter. It's purely a bias on my end. I just don't want to do that for whatever reason. And by doing that, you fail to learn. Things about those two particular movements or those combinations and what that stimulus actually looks and feels like. So, yeah, I think it's super important too, if you're a you're paying for it. So you might as well just use it. But B you're gonna learn something even if it's something bad that you don't agree with it. Speaking of timelines, I was looking at. All right, so we'll do a little coaching exercise here. Somebody sent me the other day a DM that was a program that was written by. A source we will leave said source unnamed and it was a ridiculous amount of volume, meaning there was an Emom's strength on the front end. There was skill work. There was. For sure, a metco and there was something else in there. But I do remember this. There were seven unique movements in said workout. At least four of which were complex, meaning like muscle up, snatch clean and jerk. Right.

Bethanie Werner:
And this is a one hour class?

Fern:
Well, it gets better. And in this it was touted as like this is built for a 60 minute class, at which point I'm like, I need to see that unfold. Like, I need to. I need to. I need you to mic up. Put a camera on yourself and show the world how this is done, because I'm having a hard time envisioning this. Not to say that I'm the world's greatest coach, but that is an incredible amount of work to get done in 60 minutes. Right. And this kind of goes to the program. And the reason I asked about the the the lesson plans and the workout is because I do want to make something very clear. And Jay would agree with me. I can speak for him on this because we've talked about it. We are not against doing all of those things right. I am against doing it in a 60 minute window. Right. So what people fail to forget is this. So they see so and so any. So you were a prior competitive athlete, right? So you've probably had no shortage of days with significant volume in them. Correct.

Bethanie Werner:
Twelvew part workouts that take three hours.

Fern:
Correct. Now. So here is the disconnect. When you were training for that, how long? And in war and how many times throughout the day would it take you to get that training in? So talk to me about a typical training day and then I'm going to shed a light on why this is inefficient at best and really stupid at worst.

Bethanie Werner:
Well, I was a low volume competitive athlete. I trained just once, did one today. But there were times during the season that it would take three hours,.

Fern:
OK?

Bethanie Werner:
And because of some injury history, a warm up for me can't be less than 20 minutes. If I'm really going to move,.

Fern:
Well, yeah, you're definitely not old. However, you're like me and you're not a spring chicken. Like it takes me a little while to, like, sometimes touch my toes because I'm just old and crotchety on dates. Right. I'm exaggerating, but I'm not. You know what I mean? So if you're in a three hour period when you're competing at this point. What would that three hours consist of?

Bethanie Werner:
Probably starting with some skill work could be five different items related to portions of the ring muscle up. Then may be a strength component. Probably another strength component. And then a metco of some sort..

Fern:
Cool. So if you put that in three hours, it doesn't sound so weird, to be very honest with you. And if people want to do that, then by all means, if the issue becomes when I'm jamming all of that into 60 minutes. Right. And this question regularly comes up at the level two. As we start to draw that timeline out. And then eventually somebody raises their hand and they say, I go to gym X, Y, Z. We have to do this, this and this in a one hour time period. What do you suggest that I do? To which point my response is only first thing you need to do is write a lesson plan so that you can do the best you can do with what you have. The second thing I would do is potentially have a conversation with whoever writes the programming. If that is fact, not you. But what we'll do in that exercise is like, tell me on this 60 minute timeline where you're going to teach people how to move better. And they're like, well, we could cut out the general warm up. And I'm like. Does that sound like a good idea? Like, not really. OK. What else can we cut out? Well, we can cut out a wide brief in the cool down a set. Does that sound like a good idea? To which they replied no. And and now at that point, people are starting to have this aha. Moment about like it's not about. Doing these workouts is bad. Like people are missing the point of what we're trying to say. The point that we're making is like it is fundamentally impossible to coach meaning like teach, see? Correct. In a 60 minute time frame when you're doing that in a 60 minute time period. Most games athletes, they do all that volume, but they'll have a one hour session in the morning. We'll have a two hour session in the middle of the day and they'll do another training session in the evening. And then people are coming in trying to jam that into 60 minutes while not dedicating all of the other recovery time involved with that. So it's yeah, it's a bad idea. It's not a bad idea at its core. It's like bad idea. The way you're facilitating it. It's just not intelligent to do it that way. It's like way too much in one hour. No recovery at volumes that you can't sustain.

Bethanie Werner:
So as a coach, I feel like the better coach I've become, the less I want to do that. When I was a crappy brand new coach, it sounded like a great idea. Keep them busy so I don't have to teach them anything. And now that I actually know things and want to help people, I want the time to do that.

Fern:
Which perfect segue way. What? At what point did you make that shift from? Because I think everybody, not everybody. A lot of people at some point either kind of come to that realization or they don't. They say. I'm not paying my bills being fit, right? So I need to be a better coach. At what point did you start to have that conversation with yourself? My time is probably best allocated being a better coach.

Bethanie Werner:
I think when I attended at the time, it was called Coaches Prep and now the L2. That helped me a lot to make that decision. And that was 2014 ish.

Fern:
Okay,.

Bethanie Werner:
I took that.

Fern:
Where do you take it?

Bethanie Werner:
Crossfit, strong and outside of Dallas.

Fern:
Oh,.

Bethanie Werner:
Just gigantic facility.

Fern:
So do you. Have you met Gale Yocom?

Bethanie Werner:
I have not.

Fern:
He was here this weekend. So he owns Crossfit, Strong and he's actually moving into a larger facility.

Bethanie Werner:
What?

Fern:
Yeah, it's bonkers. Now they're doing some other stuff, sir. They're doing some of that OCR stuff that you guys are doing as well. But yeah, he's super good dude in Dallas. Yeah. Who were your instructors?

Bethanie Werner:
Oh, gosh, it's been so long.

Fern:
Do you remember?

Bethanie Werner:
Probably. I don't better I don't name them, they made me cry. It was harsh back then.

Fern:
It was. Yeah. The delivery was not as polished as it is today. Okay. And so when you left there, what did you walk away from? What did you walk away with?

Fern:
More than anything? How to be better at programming.

Fern:
Really?

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah. I guess I built a spreadsheet that I used for five years after that that analyzed every week's workouts time domain minus structural gymnastics, weight lifting, a number of skills involved. And I looked at that every week that I wrote programming.

Fern:
So for those of you not taking the level two change a little bit. But the premise is the same. It's basically an evaluation seat where you have like a whole list of movements, stimulus time domain. Rep count all this stuff on there and what you do is you basically just put a little tick marks for each work out. It checks like this is a five to ten minute workout with the weight lifting and gymnastics. The movements are, you know, pull ups and thrusters and what else is in there? Low volume, stuff like that. And then what it does is it starts to give you this pattern to basically illustrate whether you are developing some sort of bias in your programming. Is that basically the same one you used?

Bethanie Werner:
Yes.

Fern:
And then when you use that, did you also use that to try to start programming forward or just using as an analysis tool?

Bethanie Werner:
I used it programming forward definitely. That we were due for this time to a set of skills, something along those lines. As far as addressing biases, that's a big part of the reason I went with comptrain to force me out of my comfort zone,.

Fern:
Which is which is legit. I don't. I've heard him talk about this and I and I actually agree with it. I don't know if they abide by it any more, but I'm a huge fan of I do believe that there is one day a week that nobody should touch apart. There should be no weight lifting. It should be completely gymnastic, modern, structural or all of either of those. Is that still in play there for what they do?

Bethanie Werner:
Definitely.

Fern:
OK, I think it's just a very simple way to manage intensity and and give people's CNS a break right in that. And I think we talked about this recently, another podcast, but talking about like that is a very. Yeah. Todd and I talked about it. I believe and that's just a very simple way to get people off of the intensity train. Right. And just like, listen, you can't you cannot go full ham on a five mile run. Maybe you can if that's your jam. But probably not going to, you know. So that's cool. I'm glad they still do that, because I do believe that is a very, very effective way to allow more time to teach them skills. All right. But also, just give people a break. Right, from beating themselves day in and day out.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah. That's that's a big thing I took away from working with Nic Fowler, central nervous versus the central nervous system fatigue. And for, you know, the first five years of my Crossfit, career, I just 100 percent every day. And then your body starts to protect itself. It starts to reduce what your maximum hundred percent output is. And it took a lot of years to get that back.

Fern:
And that's an interesting topic, which I don't I usually don't go down that road because it's a it's it's a bit outside of the scope of the courses that we teach in Crossfit,. Right. So it's it's a but it is a real thing. Meaning that most what most people are ignoring is that if I am doing heavy lifts every single day that are not intelligently programmed, meaning like there is some sort of undulations within that programming, there's waves in my training with regard to volume and loading. At some point it becomes detrimental to the adaptation that we are trying to chase, meaning like you're going to go backwards. Right. And then so you started to see that then before you started working with Nick.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes.

Fern:
How long do you think it took you to realize that?

Bethanie Werner:
I don't know that I realized it. He told me that.

Fern:
He was like, hey, knucklehead.

Bethanie Werner:
The reason that I went to start working with him is actually that I had back surgery in 2014, uh, herniated L4, L5. Right.

Fern:
Do you know how you did it?

Bethanie Werner:
I was drunk and playing golf.

Fern:
Listen, Crossfit, is not dangerous. Everybody everybody is golf and drinking.

Bethanie Werner:
If I'm not strong enough to hurt myself with a golf club,.

Fern:
That's a good point. Good point. Which brings up. Do you. Do you guys do you guys put a lot of rotational work in your programming at all?

Bethanie Werner:
No,.

Fern:
That is something that. People miss right within Crossfit, and in that I don't know that it's a legitimate criticism because people who criticize it don't really understand it, but they they. The criticism is there's no rotational work in Crossfit, and it's like, yeah, we reserved that for sport specific training right now. If you don't play a sport, the way you get that is in good warmups or maybe putting in some accessory work and there in order to get that rotational. But in instances like yours, if you're not working rotational strength, you can develop capacity in this frontal plate movement that could be adverse. When I go into some sort of transverse or rotational movement, it's put me in a bad position. Right. So when you how long did that recovery take?

Bethanie Werner:
Oh, there was some bad complications. There was about a month where I was thinking my new goal in life was walking unassisted. So that took. Took two months to get through that portion and then another six months after that. So about eight months after surgery, until I got to the point where I was like, hey, I might be able to be an athlete again.

Fern:
What kind of loading are you doing at eight month mark like?

Bethanie Werner:
I started with no more than 50 percent of what RX was for the work out of the day or 50 percent of what my old maximum was as a very upper end just to give me some hard stuff.

Fern:
That's Top End topic. Got it. OK, I was gonna say it's a little heavy. How much physical therapy did you have?

Bethanie Werner:
A lot.

Fern:
What did you learn from that?

Bethanie Werner:
I didn't go to the right physical therapist.

Fern:
That's fair. So then the question still stands, what did you learn? What did you learn about rehab? Prehab stuff that you didn't know prior to.

Bethanie Werner:
Body position embracing. That's that's what I needed to learn.

Fern:
Are there any things that you picked up that you now know, use in coaching that you learned from that experience as far as like either a prepping your athletes or coaching them real time?

Bethanie Werner:
Definitely teaching new clients how to brace definitely came out of that experience.

Fern:
Any gems that you've got over the years that you find to be uber effective?

Bethanie Werner:
No, I'm I don't know that I have the right words for it yet. We're still trying different things.

Fern:
Okay. Maybe we can learn some words right now.

Bethanie Werner:
Yes.

Fern:
What? So what if you were to teach me and I'm a new client, what would you do? Would you tell me to do?

Bethanie Werner:
We start laying on the floor, knees bend low back, pressed against the ground, and you're trying to teach them how to make contact with our lower back.

Fern:
Yes. Got it. OK. So trying to get them to create some sort of abdominal pressure like teach you about a user diaphragm.du

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah. Um, some dead bugs, some bird dogs.

Fern:
Dude. Some of the most underutilized warm ups ever. Dead bugs are hard as shit.

Bethanie Werner:
Oh, yeah. And if you had the bird dog, if you put a PVC pipe across the base of the back.

Fern:
Yep.

Bethanie Werner:
You have to balance that and not drop it off. That increases the control.

Fern:
It's kind of a little bit of a spin off of some stuff you do on the FMS. The function movements.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah. I did active life's group class programming for about a year. I use that in my Utah gym. A couple of years ago.

Fern:
He was on the podcast.

Bethanie Werner:
Yeah.

Fern:
Twice. Makes you think twice. Yeah. What did you get from that? Because Sean's a sharp dude.

Bethanie Werner:
Actually, you're asking about the rotational stuff. That's where we definitely got the rotational work in our accessory work.

Fern:
So what rotational stuff do you really like to put in the classes? And then second question is, do you program that into a workout or are you putting that stuff in like warm ups and cool downs?

Bethanie Werner:
I don't put it until work out. I want to be really controlled, properly executed, not for time when I was doing it. It was a dedicated five to 10 minute cooldown every day. And initially people are on board. They're excited about it. And then there was some burnout and probably by eight months and people just not want to do it. They were sneaking out the backdoor to get away from it.

Fern:
Yeah. That stuff is hard to get people to do. It's like particularly you're gonna make it mandatory. Like there's some ways you can make it fun, but even then, it's kind of loses its steam. We write the accessory work and the rule is like, do some of it, do all of it, do none of it. We don't care. It's there for you when we have time. We'll throw it in and do it as a group and we'll play some games, do some stuff like that. I'm a big fan of like just just good old fashioned Russian twists. Just because people can do it from a seat position, they can do it loaded. They can do it unloaded. They can do with their feet on the floor. They can do without their feet on the floor. But I find it to be really, really beneficial. And for those of you don't know, it's basically like sitting on the floor and kind of like a modified V up is how I would explain it. But with your knees bent but you're in the upper position and then base, you would either touch your hands on either side or like using mad ball or something like that. Really good partner warm up that you can use for people that I love to do right. Particularly when have new people in the closet is like, hey, you're gonna do a Russian twist or your partner and then do that.

Bethanie Werner:
So then there's the game where you pass the plates down the line.

Fern:
Yeah. Yep. And you can if you want to really spice that up, you as a coach can change direction whenever you want. People just go back and forth. Yeah. I mean there's so many things. And again, it's like you're only limited to your creativity with regard to that stuff. But I do believe rotational should be in there. However, it's hard to. I don't know that if you were to be like a program he has, as has the bulk of the meal, which is like the protein. The accessory work and all the rotational stuff is like the vegetables. It's not the primary focus. Right. Like I need protein. Right. And then I'm gonna add vegetables to that to get what I need on top of it.

Bethanie Werner:
That's exactly how I described it. It was I can't make people eat their vegetables sometimes.

Fern:
Yeah. Which, by the way, is OK and probably the norm. Right. But as long as you're getting them to eat vegetables and understand the value of vegetables. RHat is a win. Right. That's where it's beneficial from a coaching standpoint. And that's when people come into you and they say, hey, I just don't have a muscle up and. Are you doing the accessory work? And they're like, no. My first one. Just do that. You for the most part, you don't need special programming right now. You need to do the accessory work like we built it in so that you can get the things you want. I do believe there are people that at some point need individualized programming or they just want it, at which point give it to them. But the vast majority are just straight up GP. People don't need something super, super fancy. I want to talk to you about the last thing is is just kind of like the mentoring piece and is like you had mentioned before, we kind of hit record here that you kind of felt. I don't want to say alone, but like on literally on an island. With regard to coaching and then some of the stuff that you've found beneficial as far as the the weekly phone calls we've been doing and then other things that we do well or the things that we do poorly, quite frankly. So,.

Bethanie Werner:
OK. The mentoring program has been really helpful for me. Ouha as part of the Hawaii Islands is literally the most remote chain of islands the entire world, if measured as distance from a continent. So we're way out there and I'm largely by myself. I don't have any other coaches around the gym. So having the mentor group to bounce ideas off of and say, Hey, am I crazy if I'm having this experience or what has your experience been? How did you deal with this? It gives me a sense of connection. Without a doubt has made me passionate again.

Fern:
That's cool.

Bethanie Werner:
You know, I'm almost 10 years in and I want to read the journal. I want to write progressions. I want to video myself again. I want to be better.

Fern:
One of the things that I learned a long time ago is that generally when if I get stuck, it's because I just need somebody to a. Shed some light on something different or give me a challenge that I was not aware existed, you know, or just shed some light on something like that. And once you do that, it's not hard to find the passion again. Like you just suddenly get in this little rut. We're just like, hmm. This is a good enough. And then somebody challenging you or throws you something that really pushes the limits of your skill set. And all the sudden we are, you know, how Crossfitters are. We're competitive. And suddenly I want to get back in it again. And I and I get a little. Is that kind of what is going on there?

Bethanie Werner:
Certainly. I mean, I'm trying new techniques and skills. Couple weeks ago, I used it just simply the ready go queue in a class and it went so well. And like, yeah, I know it sounds stupid and so basic and said,.

Fern:
Oh, it sounds so dumb.

Bethanie Werner:
But controlling the movement and being of the see people and having the moving unison, it worked so well and people liked it. So it's like being told what to do.

Fern:
For sure. So for those of you who don't understand what you're talking about, get like elaborate on that a little bit because somebody is like somebody heard that and I don't know what you mean.

Bethanie Werner:
So rather than just saying, let's do I don't know. So we're doing the push press. I'm holding them in position, telling them to be ready. And now. Okay. Now we drive or whatever it might be telling them to get. I'm going to say ready and then I'll say go and letting them know what to expect, when to expect it. Getting them all moving at the same time instead of there looking like a little bunch of bobbing dolls moving up and down randomly.

Fern:
So. And this again, it sounds ridiculous when you say it right and or when ice or when anybody says it, is that changing the command to give it the command, something that it's like a preface to the command, which is. And what Bethany saying is and I see this all the time and a little to you, set everybody up and you get them in their static position, whatever it might be. And then all of a sudden you just go either there was no heads up, that there is a command coming. And here in general, you know, that this is ineffective is because people don't move in unison, meaning like I have people go at different times and it looks like the wave going around it or somebody just does something completely different, which was me doing when you're giving commands in order to basically just give people a heads up, as you just say, ready in front of it. It's kind of like in a race. What if they were just like everybody line up and just let it go? They don't do that. They say ready, set, go in that. And now everybody's. Comes off the line at the exact same time with the same thing at the Games. Right. So they have 30 seconds. Ten seconds. Stand by. Everybody knows that standby is out. Three seconds. Basically the horn goes and then they all take off at the same time. And it's no different when you're teaching your athlete how to move like they need a preface or some sort of precursor to that command that's coming so that they can essentially, like get their mind right there. OK, here we go. It's coming. And then they go. That's really cool that it worked out for you. And it is the nuances, right? Like those like little tiny things like make a big difference, without a doubt. What else?

Bethanie Werner:
I'm trying new things again, and sometimes they don't work. Oh, last week I'd got a PVC pipe involved in killing somebody on a deadlift and it was a fucking disaster. But I think as a result of the conversations I've been having within the mentor group, I'm like, okay, so I tried something. It didn't work. She didn't get hurt. She doesn't know the difference. She's brand new. So we can try something.

Fern:
That's always my question. So you clearly you it was a disaster. Did she know it was a disaster?

Bethanie Werner:
No. If anything, she thought, oh, I failed I didn't do it the right way. It was totally me. I was told that.

Fern:
And that's it. So it's it's and again, a lot of that is just insecurity. Like we're just like there's a lack of confidence when we're trying something new. And it's funny. That's what I tell the new coaches. Just try it. Nobody knows if it's gonna work. Like you cannot predict the future. And here's what happens if it doesn't work. Nothing. So you just tried a different way when you go through. But that. Trying new things and trying those cues is a how you start to kind of like shave off all the ineffective things and really kind of get down to the meat potatoes of like what works and what doesn't work. But then you might end up with a cue that wasn't originally what you set out to have, but you kind of like fumbled your way through. And I'm like, oh, I accidentally came up with this one day by screwing it up four times prior to that.

Bethanie Werner:
Exactly.

Fern:
So that's really cool. What else? Anything else? Have you started like reading and getting back into like the The not sexy stuff like the actual literature and like points of performance and faults and stuff like that.

Bethanie Werner:
Definitely. As was demonstrated one of various conference calls. I didn't even know where to find the faults in the manual.

Fern:
Well, that wasn't your fault. You're looking at the wrong version.

Bethanie Werner:
But yeah, I'm definitely going back to them and it's helping me prepare for my classes better. I started to challenge myself to look at the day's work out and write some of the points of performance the day before. So I had that readily accessible in my memory.

Fern:
Do you feel more efficient in your classes when you do that and what you spend on that beforehand? How much time?

Bethanie Werner:
I'm probably spending 15 minutes prepping for the next day, and that does include taking like the warm up and making a slide for it and Sugarwod.

Fern:
That's not a ton of time.

Bethanie Werner:
Not at all.

Fern:
But how much more efficient does it make your classes?

Bethanie Werner:
Exponentially.

Fern:
That's really cool.

Bethanie Werner:
Actually, 6:00 a.m. when I'm half asleep and that's usually the worst class today day as far as my presentation.

Fern:
Yes,.

Bethanie Werner:
That for it's also my biggest class of the day.

Fern:
So that is an interesting conversation because I don't think people look at the or maybe they don't even really realize the. The lack of customer service involved with like doing 15 minutes of prep for this exam class already tired. They want the same result, the same product as everybody else. And if you're using your 6am like I did for years as a guinea pig on like what the rest of your good classes and air quotes are gonna look like for the rest of the day. That is super shitty. And I did that for a long time. I think I'll figure out the 6 a.m. and that is just horrible. So but I did want to ask you as you brought it up the from the mentoring group. So the reason Bethany was looking for the faults was as. I believe the homework was practicing, demonstrating visual faults is clear…

Bethanie Werner:
Demonstrates the faults from one of the of the 9 fundamental .

Fern:
Okay. And then you chose the sumo deadlift high pull?

Bethanie Werner:
I did.

Fern:
And then. Talk to me a little about that. What was it? Anything that you learned from just going through that process?

Bethanie Werner:
It was very difficult to demonstrate some of the faults to get my body into the position that was proper. What I probably took away was actually the exercise before that in the homework where we were to demonstrate all nine of the foundational movements and video ourselves doing 10 reps. I am super hyper extended in my pressing finished positions and I had no idea.

Fern:
That it, but that's great. Now you know that and that is that are two things that we regularly tell people on a level one or more, the level 2, which is one, know your own movement. You need to know everything that is wrong with your movement and it has you moving perfectly does not make you a good or bad coach. It just means you're probably like everybody else and have movement faults. However, we need to know that from a coaching standpoint, because when we demonstrate movement, if it is not your best variation or you do have significant deviation from points performance, you should be calling yourself out. Otherwise, you just told everybody that that's OK. The other reason, the other thing that we will bring up is an inaccurate visual display of what the athlete is doing right, because we either have not practiced or b don't actually understand the fault of the movement. And that is a super regular or common occurrence. When we see coaches coaching other athletes and what I'm referring to is somebody gives they say, hey, your mmm.. will use. The muted hip, for instance. They will. It's either save it's somebody who's doing a muted hit when they are in fact doing an informed inclination of the chest or deep or vice versa or not show an accurate description of that, they'll still say one and show the other or just not enough deviation. All of which are the result of that is it is not clear to the athlete what should be happening. Right. And I think the practicing on the fault helps you have more cues. Right. But then it also helps you understand the movements better. Right. Yeah. And it's a it's it is a seldom practice. And that is a skill like as you just illustrated, like. You have to you have to spend some time practicing that stuff. Have you used any of it yet?

Bethanie Werner:
Definitely. And as of late, a local really fantastic Mexican restaurant has started bringing their employees in. They don't speak hardly any English. And I have like high school or travelers Spanish. I know some body parts and some numbers. So the visual cues are even more important because then they are replicating what I do. So it's it's been timely.

Fern:
That's very cool. Yeah. If you that's like the fastest way to get good a visual cues as I teach somebody a movement who does not speak the same language as you get to be real good on your visual cues. Very cool. Well, we're here in Whistler and I don't want to steal any more of your time because I know you guys are going to walk to the waterfall. So thank you for your time. This is really, really fun. And if you guys are headed out to Hawaii, hit Bethanie up, go to her gym. If you want to move to Hawaii and coach for a little bit. Hit us up. We'll hand you off, will vet you first and then will we'll be Bethanie's filter and and maybe you can get a paid vacation for a month out there and coach all fitness to the other community out there.

Mentor group and staffing agency, The Empire Grows.

There you go. Hey, I've just created two new streams of revenue of which Jay will be in charge of, so I'm not tasking myself with that. So very cool. Safe travels. And it was a pleasure. Thank you very much.

Quickly and accurately convert audio to text with Sonix.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp4 files to text.

Thousands of researchers and podcasters use Sonix to automatically transcribe their audio files (*.mp4). Easily convert your mp4 file to text or docx to make your media content more accessible to listeners.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2019—it’s fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your mp4 to text, try Sonix today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *