95. Julian and Miranda Alcaraz | Street Parking

95. Julian and Miranda Alcaraz | Street Parking

In this episode, Fern picks the brains of the founders of Street Parking Julian and Miranda Alcaraz which they started in 2016.  Miranda – after 15 years in the fitness industry, 8 years on CrossFit HQ seminar staff, and 8 years competing in CrossFit. Julian – after 10 years in the fitness industry, and 5 years competing in CrossFit. Both having trained and competed at the highest level – the CrossFit Games – they found themselves in new territory – busy. Julian was running a business and Miranda had settled into a full-time job. At the time the couple was dating and lived over an hour away from each other. They noticed something interesting. The workouts they would post on their social media from HOME – with simple equipment – was what people who followed them responded to most.

An idea was formed. Post the simple workouts we are doing at home – so people can follow along. Charge a fee that is totally doable for most people. Create a community where we can push and motivate each other. The first-ever workouts were posted in November 2016 (just a few days before Miranda found out she was pregnant with their baby boy). Memberships went up for sale the week before New Years. Within the first month, Street Parking had 700 Members.

As Street Parking continued to grow and the members were posting about how this had changed the game for them to be able to see success at home. The fire that Julian and Miranda felt to provide the best programming, community and service possible grew as well. With their own lives about to change forever with the birth of their son – they knew that this was something they wanted to dedicate themselves to 100%. Miranda left her full-time job. Julian sold his business. They went all in the business and they have one of the most successful online programmes out there.  

Time Stamps: 

(3:18) Working with your Spouse
(7:58) Street Parking Sucess

(18:00) Programming 

(28:09) Social Media  for your affiliate, what’s missing 

(32:11) Members relationship

(37:33) Being open about everything

(41:20) Making the switch from Athlete coach/full-time coach

 (50:73) Hallmark of a good affiliate 

Social Media:
@Fearlessmiranda
@009julian

Street Parking:
@streetparking
https://streetparking.com/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgrp6PEvaSTZe5qbcWSniOghttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/street-parking-podcast/id1464479946

We value your feedback. After listening, please hit me up with any questions, comments, or thoughts on how we can make this show even better, and if you enjoyed it, please share it!

Instagram; @besthouroftheirday

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman

Rate/subscribe in Apple Podcasts!

Check out our website – besthouroftheirday.com – to learn more about our private coaches development group.

Julian and Miranda Alcaraz.mp4 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Julian and Miranda Alcaraz.mp4 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2019.

Fern:
Hi, guys, welcome back to The Best out of their day for here with Maranda and Huli and Alcaraz. And if you don't know who they are, you Preben and you're in the Crossfit, community by living under a rock. But I'll give a real quick bio and then we'll get into it. So both previous games athletes as individual and on the teams, Maranda, an OG affiliate owner, seminar staff. Three hundred plus seminars under our belt. Also as a flow master, they are the owners of street parking at this point, a massive community which is doing some pretty awesome things in my opinion. And let's think about this beforehand. I think at this point you might have more insight on how to do this well than almost anybody in the community based on like where you started and the things that you're doing now. So selfishly, I'm I'm kind of excited to have this conversation. I think it's just you have a lot of things and seeing it from so many different levels as an original affiliate owner through that growth, as a flow master and now at the broader community, working with just a massive amount of athletes, that you can really shed some light on some things that we all can do better, myself included inside the affiliate. Every day to kind of foster that community. So, again, thank you guys for your time and your super busy.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Wow, thank you.

Julian Alcaraz:
Thank you so much.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Hopefully we'll be able to live up to this this exciting intro.

Fern:
I have no doubt. So my first question is, who do you guys consider to be the same person in your relationship? So my wife and I go through this. Yeah. Who's who's who's the owner there? That was quick.

Miranda Alcaraz:
You can use much sane than me, right? I mean, granted pretty much I mean, half of our relationship, I've been pregnant or breastfeeding. And so that's not really a fair question, but.

Julian Alcaraz:
In her, you know.

Julian Alcaraz:
But I don't want you saying all responsibility for being non sane one. You know, there was a point where I struggled a lot with a lot of insecurities and a lot of. You know, just the problems in general, so she's helped me kind of feel comfortable to kind of address those things and just be the person that I am now, which is strong support for her and the family. The way she is, the strong support for myself and our family. So, yeah. Then she carries the. The weight of it all when it comes to growing the family. So I got to do my best to always make sure that no ego gets in the way. Be as understanding as possible and try to put myself in her shoes. You know, we had to talk about this the other day. How many people take the time to actually thank their wives for being pregnant? Because it's just because it's not happening to us as men. We don't realize all the things that they're going through until they hit like that emotional dump. And they're like, oh, my gosh, I can't do this. And then a lot of people, they'll look at them be like, oh, she's crazy, she's pregnant. She's crazy. But it's like, well, no, actually, she's just going through a lot. So I. Yeah, this thing. Thank you for that.

Fern:
I can empathize with that hour. We have two kids, five and a half and seven, almost eight month old. But our our daughter was born 15 weeks early. And so that was a I don't recommend that she's fine. But I really got to see that when my wife got to go full term with the second baby. And at that point. So I can empathize with you. And as far as I just I would just happy for her to be crazy. And on those days when she was just like losing it, because I was aware that she was actually getting to do what she wanted to do was like carrying a baby full term because she dealt with a lot of like postpartum stuff with that first one. So I totally get that. So what are some of the big lessons you guys have learned? So my wife and I still struggle with this at times is like just some guidelines as far as working with your spouse, because most people don't have to do that. Right. To work together and they have to go home. You have to deal with that interaction as well.

Miranda Alcaraz:
I think we're really lucky because we both love what we're doing so much, where it's not unbalanced, where one of us loves what we're doing more than the other one, and the other one's like, okay, let's stop working like I'm over it. We're both very passionate about it. And I think along the way we figured out our different strengths and weaknesses. At first, when it was just the two of us and I still had another job and he still had his other business. It was a little bit more difficult because we're both kind of trying to do everything. But now we can delegate tasks more to where we don't really overlap that much with each other. Like we're here together and we talk about big decisions and things like that. But I think it's important for you guys to figure out your strengths and weaknesses and allow the other person to do what they're good at. And you go do what you're good at, come together for big things. But I think that's what's helped more recently.

Julian Alcaraz:
Yeah, it really has. Also, because the first rule book, for example, when we first started street parking, it was just like who runs what? Right now we're at a point where after all this growth and development, even self-development ourselves, understand that. Maranda, like you said in the intro, she's had hundreds of hundreds of hours of coaching and running, being on a seminar staff where I haven't I've had hundreds of hours of being an athlete and I've had hundreds of hours of being like an in-person coach, but never having to teach seminars. Right. So knowing that she's got a big strength there. It's like, look, believe in what this product is, you know, that I'd back it 100 percent and then it trickles down from there. So never. Getting in the way of a vision that makes sense because we're in it together and just realizing, you know, where to go from there.

Miranda Alcaraz:
I think the other thing that helps us, both of us have the same goal for the business like it is that one of us wants to make it this huge empire and the other one wants to keep it small and never hire anyone. Both of us have the same idea that we wanted to be as big as it can be while it's still manageable and while we're still able to enjoy our life together. So it's not like one person's like a hard driver and the other person is lazy or anything like that either. So it's it's finding those things.

Yeah, that's something that because my wife is still in the military search like we struggle with how much for her to be involved. That doesn't like create too much stress on her because she's doing like a second job on top of that. So I left the military years ago and then I'm in the box full time, still working on seminar of our staff and doing that stuff. So that's kind of my full time gig. And and we've had that struggle where we've got to sit down and say, OK, what is appropriate as far as workload for you to take on in addition to your regular job? You do in addition to being a mom of two, you know, and all that other stuff, in addition to take care of the household, when I travel, you know, 40 weekends a year to do seminars. So, yeah, we've definitely had to we've definitely had to learn that the hard way and a lot of scenarios. And I've had to eat a lot of crow and a lot of a lot of scenarios that you're right. And I'm really sorry that it took me twenty four months to come around like that. So with regard to street parking. I mean, clear. I don't think anybody expects it to be. Like what you guys create, like. I don't know that you guys said you're like, this is gonna be an empire. We like more clients than anybody could ever imagine. Like, how did that kind of unfold? Because it happened fairly quickly. I mean.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Yeah. Speaking at a fairly quickly, we're coming up on four years of knowing each other like literally four years ago. At this moment, we hadn't even met. And so working on baby number two and having like 30 employees that like, yeah, as now. But looking back, it didn't necessarily always feel quick at the time, but. It was quick. We didn't set out for it to have a certain number at all. We thought it'd be cool if we had 100 hundred members to help us pay our rent and just thought as something that people were already kind of latching onto when we would do it at home or when I was still traveling in hotel work outposts. So it was more like a side fun thing since we were posting that stuff anyway to make it a little bit more official. It was never there was no never a master plan for it to become anything big.

Fern:
Is there. What's been the hardest part for you guys? So this is kind of a question that most of billionaires hope they have to deal with and then some do and some some don't end up having to deal with it. But like, what's been your biggest struggle on the back end of the business as you guys have scaled and gotten larger and larger? Like what are some of the hard lessons you guys have learned? Like, man, that was tough.

Julian Alcaraz:
You know, relationships will come and go. One of the hardest things has been to find a team that we have now. And because it is a lot of pressure, it is a lot of weight. Right. Because everybody here has relocated to be a part of this vision from where they were at. We have people from Florida. We have employees from California. Utah. Like. And they just it believed in this so much. So that's kind of hard on us. But. And making sure that those individuals fit and hoping that they do get the vision. It's one thing saying, yes, I get what you're doing, but then once the yes happens, then how is their work ethic? Once they choose to relocate and how how's that going to go? Because people get excited about being part of a company that looks cool on social media because of all the work that's being put behind the scenes. But there's another step to come in and then be a part of. Behind the scenes, the long hours and the the unspoken words of like we're not going to tell you guys to not work on weekends, but it shows us how much. But it shows how much you guys truly believe if you genuinely are putting in the time that we've put in to continue to make this what it is like. Why are you guys here? And I see that as a big fault when it comes to building a team for a brick and mortar gym, because people, of course, they just want to go in and they want to be a coach. Why do you want to be a coach? Why do you want to be a part of a coach in my business as opposed to you come to be a coach just for the experience so that you can go do your own thing. So just finding the right team and and really breaking down those layers to figure out what their true motives and goals are. You know, because like I said, we've had to break relationships up and it hurts because, you know, we we build a friendship with these individuals and with trust in them. And when it doesn't work, it doesn't work. So that's I would say that's step one.

Fern:
Are there things, are there things that you guys have done to foster that? Because like Miranda, you've clearly seen it probably like at the micro level, but now at the macro level. So anybody who's own an affiliate, we just came up on 10 years and I'm thinking back of like all the coaches who came in. I want to coach. This is gonna be amazing. And they basically want to free membership and do whatever they want on the side. Meanwhile, I'm trying to figure out why they walked by the full trashcan a dozen times today and didn't look at it, you know, so I think we're in a pretty good spot now. But I don't it might be embarrassing to say I don't know. But like, it took 10 years before we like before we put a real hard screen on that and got to the point where I was OK, saying, no, this you don't fit the culture here. Like, that's fine.

Miranda Alcaraz:
You know, I think that one of the greatest lessons that I learned working on the seminar staff was seeing the hiring process. Now I was hired. There was not much of a hiring process at all. That was in 2008. But as I was a flow master, there was like a period of time where being on seminar staff, you were like a celebrity in the Crossfit, community and everyone wanted to be on seminar staff. And just I know you've been doing it for a while now and the internship process was brutal. I remember even when I got hired, the first few seminars that I worked with, I paid for myself to get there. I was paid zero dollars and I had to borrow money from my parents to go basically apply for this job. And so I really gained a lot from that experience. We would have games, athletes come and they would want to work on seminar staff and they would think that they would just have it in the bag because they were games athletes and then they would show up literally two minutes late and would be asked to leave like, you know, you know how it is. So I'm really I was really grateful for that. I was really grateful for the amount of feedback that I got during that period of time and just seeing how important that whole cycle is. And so, yeah, I mean, sometimes I feel that I have to back off a little bit because I can have a tendency to expect that of everyone and not everybody who's been through that experience yet. But I would say especially like when we travel and stuff, it's been a huge eye opener to our employees. Like how hard we work and that this is not a vacation and that like you're on the whole time and we're here for our members. We're not here to have fun. And so, yeah, that's something that I really learned from working on some of our staff.

Fern:
It's super funny you bring that up because it's not something you can explain to somebody like you can't explain. People just think it's awesome. What do you just travel around and teach seminars? It's amazing. And you can't people can't grasp like how tired you are on Sunday just because you've been going just 110 percent, giving everybody everything. And then I agree with you on the internship process, that is. Any time I have ever come down off of that standard for what the expectation is for somebody coming on my team at the affiliate, it might not have been immediately, but I regretted it every single time.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Yes. So we have like almost the people who started here took huge pay cuts to come here. Like you said, they moved here. We expected them to, you know, pick up and leave and they're expected to work a lot. And it's kind of a screening process in itself. And our goal isn't to keep them at that lower pay amount. But we want to see like, will they take a pay cut to come here? And if not, then they're probably not going to be the right person anyway. So, yeah, it's been it's been good. And I think that's important. Like what he said to why why this gym as opposed to the gym down the street. Is it just because we're hiring or because you've been a member or you've seen something in our community and really getting to the bottom of that?

Fern:
No, I think that's. I think people struggle with that because it's the process takes longer and it's harder as the employer to really hold that line and say, listen, that's that's not actually good enough. Like, I know you're trying hard, but we need to actually recalibrate what like working hard is. And see if you can meet that. But it's uncomfortable. It's uncomfortable for you as the as the leader of an organization to get to that point where you're okay saying that to people or seminar staff helps. But yeah, that and it's uncomfortable for people who have never been held to a standard like that. That's the really hard part where people don't know what they don't know.

Miranda Alcaraz:
And I think sometimes I mean, even with that's because we a very small and we would literally like a year ago we were still working at Starbucks on our computers and then we had like folding tables and chairs from Costco. And so people maybe assume when they walk into a gym or a situation like that, that it's not going to be super professional and there's not going to be hard rules. And you gotta be on time and you gotta take out the trash. It's just gonna be like the bro sesh all day, every day. And that's not if you run your gym that way, you're gonna have a problem. So I think a lot of times maybe when people are trying to get hired as a trainer, they don't think of it as a need to be professional and work hard and that kind of thing.

Fern:
When you brought that up about people showing up two minutes before, I'm trying to think about the number of interns that I got cut on day one that just like showed up five. I remember one where the floor mat. This guy walked in five minutes late, mind you. And everybody was just holding their breath or it was like, how is this going to go? And the flow master, I think it was Joe Alexander. He's just like, you weren't in the military, were you? And he was like, no. And he goes, yeah, I can tell. And like, went right over his head. Like, he didn't get what the point of that convert that interaction was. And that was it for him. He was gone. And it might have been a nice guy. Maybe not. I don't know.

Miranda Alcaraz:
I still have nightmares. Like I still will dream about being late to a seminar in my hands. Like you have dreams of being late to school. Dreams of seminars being late. So funny.

Fern:
I'll wake up in the morning. Sometimes I'm like, what time is it? Do I miss the trainer meeting with what is happening right now? I want to switch gears a little bit and talk about parking a little bit more in depth. But I wanted to get your guys take on programming because I've heard you discuss it a little bit. And I think you guys probably fall probably what I would consider into the bucket of old school with or with regard to programming. I don't know. You have a pretty good relationship with Patrick. I started his gym like eleven years ago, I think. And I personally kind of look around in the community. I see a lot of people that I think fall in that bucket. And it's it's all what I would consider simple. Can you guys talk a little bit about like, do you think that has. Helped your success with regard to street parking.

Miranda Alcaraz:
I think it helps with the success of our members, which helps with the success of Street Partnership. I think that because it's online, it's easier for us to communicate what's expected and what the goals are for the work out and what the movements are and things like that. I think it's easier for them to wrap their head around it and just do the workout, which gives them a higher intensity. They're able to keep a higher intensity. We don't program anything super. There's always a dumbbell option. Tons of our workouts have just body weight options, so they're able to move faster, more, consistently safer. And because they're on their own and we're not there to coach them, which gets them better results. And then that helps the community.

Fern:
And I bring that up because the tendency, which I'm sure you guys see is to do more when a lot of. I mean, I mean, virtually every conversation with regard to programming at a level one or level, two, is a conversation about volume in the day, at which point we're just constantly pulling people back into what you don't need all of that, like you're doing it wrong. And it's hard to get people to bite off on that. But I do think I don't know if you guys see I do see a little bit of a shift back. Maybe not all the way back to just do less, but at least center is what we're starting to see, which I think is good for the community as a whole.

Julian Alcaraz:
You know? Every person that wants to start their journey when it comes to working out always wants to feel like they're in control of that. And what our programming with a lot of people has gotten has put people in a position where they don't feel in control of what they're doing. They feel humiliated. They feel humbled, which only a certain mentality. And it's like the athlete mentality that will I want like that not to fire them up. But for the most part, that's a big insecurity for a lot of people that take their first steps to walking into a gym. So keeping things simple has actually made it so that way they feel like they're in control of their work, their workouts, and naturally that will progress them into. Oh, I can do this now. What's next? As opposed to being put in a position where, like, I have no control. I can't do that. I can't do. And then they panic. So it's just you, right? Going back to the basics, which are very effective, and memoranda have been working out from one work a day for the last since we started. Street parking. You know, obviously when I was training at the time for the Games, it was a little different. But I still kept condense that down to an hour and the district park and workout. And I skip I modified it up to my ability and then I would throw in an accessory weakness and that's it. And then back to what? And still keeping the purpose of what we talk about all the time. So, yeah, that's why we take approach of the simplicity. And then telling the members more than nothing. Right. Because it's going to be hard for them even on their day to day to just even jump into a gym based off of all of their daily struggles that they're going through. And I think as coaches and owners, sometimes we forget their obstacles on a day to day and we're like, you're here. So do it right. And that can be very intimidating to them. It's like, well, are you understanding of my life? So once you kind of allow yourself to be understanding what they're going through and keeping things simple, it sets them up for that connection that they're needing from a workout program.

Miranda Alcaraz:
I think as a gym owner to like I can only imagine now being someone who works a lot and has a child and you know, we're trying to always like work on our marriage and everything. When I was a gym owner, I was just a gym owner and I was at the gym all day and then working seminars.

I didn't have a kid or anything like that. I was younger. And we always kept it simple at our affiliate because it was 2008 to 2011. And that was still like. But I can't imagine if I was a member of a gym now being as tired as I am or stressed out as I am working all day and taking care of my child, if I looked at what the work out of the day was. And it was like part ABC D. I just like like I can't. But if it just said like thrusters and burpees, I'm I'd be like, Hey, that sounds terrible, but I can wrap my head around that. And so for getting people to show up, I think if it's just over programmed in every minute of the classes like just full and you got to be going the whole time and your mind's got to be on the whole time and there's no real time for them to chat with each other and just laugh and de-stress. I wouldn't be super amped to go in unless I had a lot of energy and felt like it, which for most people is not very often.

Fern:
Exactly. And when? For anybody who hasn't picked up on a lot of what you guys are talking about is everything that you guys have design. I know because I've been doing this long enough, is intentional around being empathetic to your members, understanding that they're dealing with things, that they have a life that is stressful. That this is intended to be beneficial to their life and not add more stress to that. But what I think is really cool is that you guys have been able to do that at scale. And you brought up something in a previous podcast that I was listening to about getting feedback from your members of why they left their affiliates. And what I thought was just crazy, which is largely the point of this podcast, is. People were telling you that they got more coaching from you virtually than they were in the affiliate, and this kind of goes back to a previous podcast that we did, which is we're just trying to get people to open up their eyes to be like. As a whole, the affiliate's can be better, like we're just not good enough coaches collectively, we just put us all in the bucket. Like everybody needs to be better. But that is. That's crazy to me. That somebody is getting better coaching via the Internet than they would walking into your gym like that is just asinine.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Yeah, I think a lot of times because of the way people structure their classes and because maybe their coaches are coaching too many classes back to back to back, which is exhausting and hard. Or maybe the coach isn't the person who programs that work out, which is fine, but doesn't take the time to dissect the workout and think about it and break it down. So for us, we provide this is how this is how long the workout should take. And so if you're looking at the workout. If it's four rounds, the first round should take, you know, longer than five minutes. And if it does, you need to change something. And we encourage them to change even mid workout if they need to. This is how you should choose your weight. This is how many reps in a row you should be able to do. We give no nothing. We have put no emphasis on our eggs or anything like that. We really encourage people to choose weights for what they're able to do. We give them all sorts of substitutions and modifications for equipment. And then also just for, you know, because we have people who are former games athletes and people who have not worked out ever or in gear. So we have to jam all of that information in there into our descriptions every day. And I think it's really time consuming. But I think that's where coaches might get not lazy on purpose, but maybe just don't even take the time to think through that before they just go in and start coaching class.

Fern:
It's super funny to bring it up. One of the most downloaded episodes that we have for our podcast is the episode on the whiteboard brief because what we told everybody and I tell this to people on the weekends at the seminar at. I'm going to go out on a limb and say that virtually every scenario that you're going to pose to me about the athlete in your gym that gives you problems or the thing that you're having to struggle with all the time can be solved in that three minutes at the whiteboard brief. And just based on what you just told me, as you guys have essentially mastered the art of painting a picture of what is supposed to happen so that people like, OK, I get it. I know what's going to happen. Like, here's what's appropriate. And that is I agree with you. That's what I don't think coaches spend enough time doing, is just understanding what this workout is intended to be. It's not just a thing that we wrote with reps on it. And then you just kind of do it like, hey, whatever happens, happens. Guys, like knows it was designed intentionally. And I don't think coaches really understand the value of that. What you guys provide to people, to your athletes on the front end, which is like, guys, this is supposed to be done very specifically. Right. Not just whatever happens to unfold. Do your members. I would imagine they have to appreciate that. I would imagine most people would probably like buy into that.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Yeah, I would say most people do. We have some of the same struggles that coaches in the gyms have like. We'll take so much time to do these videos with like so we have a demo video every day that shows all the movements and all this sub options. And then whichever one of us is in that video, we'll do like we'll choose one movement to do a tip on how to be more efficient on it. We rotate what movement we choose and things like that. And then there's this big, long written description. And literally we get questions like, well, what if I can't run? And it's right there. Right. So the thing you're like I as a coach, you like I just told you what the workout is like, you know? So we have the same issues, but.

Fern:
Good to know that you guys do with it virtually, because that is something I just tell coaches when they come on. If you can't deal with somebody asking you a question that you just covered four times like this, pretty much the job I've I've given what I thought was the world's greatest white word brief and then had one of my members just raise your hand. I'll be honest with you. I wasn't paying attention to anything you just said. Can you just at that point, I'm like your. You're just here to workout. Got it. Understood you're not here to listen to me talk.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Yeah. And that's the thing, too, is I think a lot of time we get because we have a very active Facebook group and people will say, oh, I did today's workout wrong. And they think that they're like in trouble or something like, oh, whatever. Like, yeah, you did too many rounds or you cut the run short or I was like, it's fine. You worked out good job, you know. So we don't take it too seriously or make them feel, you know, dumb or wrong if they mess something up. And we're more concerned that they just did something at all.

Fern:
So on that note. So obviously, to do what you guys are doing, you it's basically a requirement that you use social media pretty effectively. What are some things that you guys have found that you were doing? That affiliates should be doing on social media.

Julian Alcaraz:
Well, for starters, one of the things that we make sure we keep even from the beginning, we just engage so much with our community online. We comment on everybody who's the hashtagging street parking. We follow every single one of our members. We're always encouraging them. We have a whole line of commenters that are members and have been members. So that way they can relate to the members that we currently have. Right. Same thing with Miranda. We'll go live often so we can chat with our members. Answer any questions as much as possible. I mean, we're just so heavily engaged and letting them know that for us, it's not about getting new members. It's about taking care of the members we currently have. Making them feel important because if they don't feel important, they're going to go to someone else. Makes them feel important. All right. So just gonna take care of the people you have engaged with them and let them speak highly of you and your and your gym. And that's going to be that, too, because then they'll understand what their purpose is being there and the mission of the gym. And they'll bring in the people that feel fit that role. They'll know which friends to target. And that's just going to continue being loyalty. It's slower. It is because you can definitely go run ads. You can do definitely group- on. But now you're inviting somebody who doesn't understand the culture of your gym. And this is all stuff that I've learned heavily from watching Miranda approach things. And even just once hearing her talk about it, we discuss then we apply it and we actually stick to it. So

Miranda Alcaraz:
, yeah, I think like you have to build real relationships. And in 2019, if you're really friends with someone, you follow them on Instagram and you pay attention to the things that they pose. So I think of it as like if you let's say you had a favorite coffee shop that you went to, that coffee shop started following you and would like you came in. And we're like, oh, my gosh, I saw I was your son's birthday over the weekend. Like, that was those pictures were so awesome. You would be like, oh, my gosh. Like, they actually know me as a human being. One of the things that I talked about on that podcast that you were listening to before that talk that I get to affiliate owners was. How powerful would it be if you knew that so-and-so's grandma died and during the week and then they showed up two days later, if the coach of the class knew that and said, hey, I know you're going through a lot, like, let me know if you need anything. So glad you're here with us. And just if you just follow your membership I mean, for us, we're following like over seventeen thousand people. We try to keep a pulse on it. If you've got 200 members just asking the coach, like, hey. On the days that you're coaching to swipe through to see what's going on in people's days and get to know the members and comment from our our gyms Instagram page, or it maybe it's a Facebook group or whatever, but that's how you get to know who's coming to your gym. That's where you get to know who your market is, because every crop, every Crossfit, gym is different, no different than our program attracts different people. Then comp train and even different people than Pat Sherwood's lynch pin or whatever. We get to know who are our members, who is attracted to this. And then we can do a better job of serving them. And I think that's important for the gyms to do as well.

Fern:
And that is something that really stuck out to me, which is kind of one of the main reasons I wanted to talk to you both is because part of my personal mission with regard to the podcasts Best hour of their day is to talk to people and expose the community to things that eliminate their excuses to do what they do poorly. Right. So you guys are that example of if you can have relationships with 15000 people and you guys don't have 200 employees. Right. If you can have relationships, then no gym owner has an excuse to not have these relationships. If you have one hundred members, then. I don't know. I'll just say this pretty bluntly. Then you're just lazy, like you're just not trying hard enough.

Julian Alcaraz:
I say this in defense of gym owners, though one thing me and Miranda do talk about because people have gone real heavy emotionally on our Facebook page. Yeah, we talk about man. This is one of the things that we do not miss is just having to go, only seeing those people on a day to day and then having them. Let's just say if you'll connect the two and then they don't want to leave.

Julian Alcaraz:
It's like we could just shut our screens off. We're back in a to be back. Ya know? That in itself, like I can see you being so emotionally draining because then how do you tell that person that's nonstop gossip being in the gym to be like, hey, like, I get it, but don't do that. You know, like. That's not good because that's not healthy either. So those are different obstacles that you guys face as like having a box as opposed to us. But we definitely would puse on that. And for us, it's easy as we're in delete this comment, reach out to individual, let them know why like we did that. Please, like, email us directly because we'd love to chat with them, but don't involve when it comes to certain topics. I can't have that kind of be in our environment. So yeah. So give me some little slack on it. That's right. That's rough. Yeah.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Yeah. That we talked about is like if you're if you're a coach and you coach the 9 a.m. and then you don't coach, you get to the noon, pay that coach to go on to the Facebook group or pay that coach an hourly rate for those three hours to go comment on people's Instagrams or or do some post or something. They're just going to sit around or work out the whole time anyway so you can put them to work doing something else.

Fern:
Yeah, but it's funny you talk about getting stuck at the gym. My wife has like it's a running joke that she'll text me and ask me when I'm coming home and I'll say I'm leaving in five minutes. And she sits and she says immediately, you just know you'll be home in an hour. And the gym is six minutes from our house. She's like, I know you're gonna get stuck talking to somebody. But it can be emotionally draining. But. I mean, that's kind of that's what you signed up for. Like that is also what keeps people in the gym.

Miranda Alcaraz:
I would say that's what differentiates us from most of the other online programs, too, because most people see what we're doing or see the online programs face and like, oh my gosh, maybe they are a gym owner and like, wait, hold on. I don't have to have relationships with anyone. I can just put a workout up and then I'll make all sorts of money. And I've said it a million times. I think our programming is great. I think we offer way more options than most, if not all other programs. But the big difference is the connection that we have with the people and the amount of time that we're spending building relationships with them online. It's a lot of work. And most people when they get into the online space, it's not it's not the reason that they're doing it. Yeah.

Fern:
And I think a lot of people don't do it, whether it's virtual or an affiliate. It is for that exact reason, like it's hard and and most people are not going to sit at the computer and send 70 text messages to their members in the afternoon like I did yesterday, just to see how's it going? Like, what's up? And that's something that I had to learn the hard way is that regardless of like how slow you want to build or if you know you're trying to grow your gym, the first thing you have to do is keep who you have right now requires time. So we've got to the point now where we break it up between the coaching staff. I pretty similar just on a much lower scale than you guys have. Is we reaching out and and texting or email or calling every single member in the gym,;

Fern:
Every single month. What's up and kind of like what you mentioned earlier, some of the responses that I've gotten back. I was not prepared for like like incredibly emotional or just crazy stuff where, you know, I was just expecting you to just say, yeah, I was working not give me a long thing about how you're dealing with depression, you know? Yeah, but now I have the opportunity to help you work because you were going to stop coming. And then you were going to have to deal with that on your own. And now I can help you, at least in the gym, at least, to kind of start to deal with that. But those are a little things that you're not going to find out unless you're reaching out to people. The other thing I want to ask you guys is because you guys. And this is I've kind of followed you guys on there. You guys do a good job. It's not a good job. You do it, but you're very. Open to being vulnerable on social media, like, you know, like I've seen you Maranda on there, just like really just kind of putting all your feelings on your sleeve. And I think that is. It might be due to pregnancy, I don't know. But like I it's that's not something that you typically see from people. It's kind of the opposite of social media these days where like everybody just shows you the good shit nobody's like. Today was terrible, like. And that's just how it roll sometimes everybody. And I think that is it's very authentic. And I think affiliate owners could do a better job of that. Just exposing you like, listen, like this is not all rainbow and sunshine. Like we have shitty days just like everybody else. And I think that makes you more human and helps. You can make connections. But is that something that you have you always been like that opens about or is that something you've learned?

Miranda Alcaraz:
I would say I've always been like that just as a person. And I'm very empathetic. Maybe sometimes to a fault and. Yeah, but you know, some things that I learned. About that specifically when it comes to being a trainer was in 2012 when I was in my car accident and we shared that story and I shared a lot of my recovery and just the amount of people that reached out to me afterwards saying like, you know, I've followed you for a long time, but you're I can connect. I feel like I can connect with you more now because you showed that you had to struggle and you went through this. Then even though it's different than my struggle, I saw that not every, you know, everybody has their things that they go through. And, you know, I kind of did the same thing when I injured my knee and I showed the the right I mean, there was tons of footage of me just crying on the Crossfit, games floor. So, you know, people really reached out after that. And I just I guess I've always understood the importance of you can't really connect with somebody who's not willing to share them selves as well. And yeah, I think I don't know if I got it from my parents or something, but I've always just kind of been like that as a person and I've seen how much it how important it is as a trainer.

Fern:
Is that hard to manage, like do you like? Because I know a lot of people wouldn't do that for fear of judgment. Is that something you've had to work through? Like, so I write a blog that's like the written version of kind of what you've done on some of your social media. And it's basically all about like things I've messed up or like what a horrible dad I was that day or something like that. Really. I forgot to take my kid to school one day, you know? And yeah, long story. But but people come back to me like I don't like I used to envision you as this this coach who was up here. But now I see you as a person, which makes this interaction a lot easier. I've just always been this person. Like, I don't really care if you like me or not. It's just I am who I am. But not everybody is like that for. Into free to put yourself out on social media. That's really hard for some people to be vulnerable. Be like. I'm crying to everybody right now.

Miranda Alcaraz:
You know, it's funny because unlike our like third date, I told him like every secret and everything that he might find out eventually. I was like, listen, I don't have. I was like thirty three years old or something like that. I was like, I don't have time to figure out if you're still gonna like me once you find all this stuff out. So I just, like, told him everything up front. Yeah, I think I think for me, maybe it's it's the way that I am because I'm really bad at lying and I'm really bad at hiding my emotions. So I might as well just tell you what's going on. And I don't think you need to be as, like emotional as I am or like, you know, share everything. But if your job specifically is a trainer, for example, you don't need to share what's going on in your relationship or you as a parent. But you should work out with people and they should see you struggling through a workout. At least you should share. I'm tired today and I don't feel like working out. But I'm still gonna do it or I didn't work out at all last week and I ate pizza because I was stressed out about this or that and show that you have the same struggles that they do and how you're overcoming them. You know, I'm sure stuff that doesn't have anything to do with your job, but at least if you can share that stuff, then no. I mean, because a lot of trainers, especially if you're like a fit younger guy or gal, people going to like this person doesn't understand me. They have no problems in their life. They're just working out all day and looking hot and doing whatever. But if you can share some of the struggles that you have when it comes to training or working out, I think it can help people trust you more. A lot more, actually.

Fern:
Yeah, I think it's what I've learned is it just it makes you a real person, not this this person who sits at the top and judging everybody and do all that. listen, I messed things up, too. It's fine. I get it. Don't sweat it. I'm the kind of on that same note. Because both of you guys competed at a very high level. And I do think just based on. We're a lot of affiliates are now I think there's a lot of affiliate owners, / coaches who are kind of going through this evolution where they started again because they want to get fit and they wanted to compete. But now they're of whatever you call aging out or whatever, and they have to make this switch to understanding that. Yeah. I'm not going to pay my bills being fit, so I should probably be a pretty good coach at this point, is it was that some people struggle with that. Some people don't. Is that something you guys had to go through?

Julian Alcaraz:
I would say definitely way more than her and like she's always had. You know, a good future lined up for her. Wow, I was like, you know, when to L.A.. Wanted to become an actor. Which, let's be honest,.

Miranda Alcaraz:
That is realistic, is becoming a games athlete

Julian Alcaraz:
Pretty much, as you know.

Fern:
I mean, we've done both. So we each like both those boxes.

Julian Alcaraz:
Yeah, I have. But it was a lot of growing that came from that. You get the point where you do realize. Being healthy is as a blessing in itself, right? And how you apply that into the day to day, you know, because you get. But I empathize with athletes because everyone is out there trying to prove something to themselves and they have to be honest as to what it is that they're trying to prove to themselves. That's why you'll see certain athletes still out there, you're like wondering what to do about why he's still out there. Like, do you what are you doing? Like, why are you coming back? Like, you're amazing. That's it. Like you're a legend. Why are you there still? And now you get to a point where you just feel bad. So what I say in return, like what I went through, is taken a moment, luckily getting married and just having something look forward to as a father, as I know that this is not realistic anymore. It's not paying the bills. It's how can I take what I've learned and turn it and apply it to what we're currently doing? It was really hard. I would say even after a year of Street Parking and knowing that I wasn't going to complete the next year, it was like water balloons and even just doing an online qualifier. Just to participate in it like my ego with you giving me like a hard time, just doing that just for me. Facing that I wasn't in the top top 1 percent anymore. But that's OK, because I'm still really fit and I am to do what I need to do. I'm way ahead of the game and I feel great. I've cleaned up my eating. I've applied everything on my energy into educating myself, learning how to be a better father, husband, business owner, and that's rewarding. So it's refining purpose. I feel a lot of people struggle with because when their purpose was something for so long. I get it. I totally get it. But in order for you to get to that point, you have to slow down and stop and be honest with yourself and do it. Why am I doing this? And I don't think people of other solves that.

Miranda Alcaraz:
You know, it's something that I use. And maybe you guys still say it or maybe some coaches still say at the level ones when teaching the pull up progression. We say now pay attention to the actual way that we're coaching this because no one cares how many pull ups you can do. They care how many you can help them to be able to do so. This isn't about you showing off a new 10 Pull-Ups in a row. Like let's learn how we're teaching this so you can take that back with you. And it's so true. Like people really and the Crossfit, community or fitness community at large. Honestly, and I know this to be true because I've been out of it now for for almost five years, has no idea who competes in the Crossfit, games. They don't.

Fern:
Zero.

Miranda Alcaraz:
The entire time I was on seminar staff, people thought I competed every year and I only competed in 2008 and 2014. The seemed like the entire time in between. People just assumed because of the way that I looked or because I could muscle ups that I was a games athlete like, you know, they just knew that I was a great coach and we're inspired by watching me work out. So I think people put way too much emphasis on on that title and don't understand that people don't really care. They just care if you inspire them. That's important for sure. But then also how you can help them.

Fern:
Yeah, that's. I mean, I'm about as entrenched in the Crossfit,. I've judging my sixth or seventh year judging. And I think the past three years I've shown up there having zero idea who the athletes are.

Fern:
I mean, there's a couple of big names, you know, but both on my way, there are people like who's you know, who do you want to win? I'm like, I have no idea who's who's going to be. I'm just going to show up there and judge the squat, you know, tell him yes or no. You know, so but no, we do still start a lot of those breakouts for the pull up and the muscle up that way. And I'll ask people how many because of muscle ups, raise your hands and nobody cares like nobody cares because somebody can do more muscle ups than you. Here's who cares. That woman, that's that mom with two kids who wants to do a muscle up here? You're gonna make her year by getting her the muscle up. That's who cares about that skill? Right. I think that and I think a lot of coaches and I'm I know you've seen him around a lot of coaches struggle to be good coaches because they might not have a skill.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Mm hmm.

Fern:
Right.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Yeah.

Fern:
And they and they undervalue what is actually important, which is allow getting somebody else to their goal. Is there. Have you guys been able to do any of that within your community there? Because I know you guys are doing the virtual coaching there, but are you guys seeing that as well? And I ask that because you guys are both incredibly fit and you're still really fit even though you're working at one time of day and kind of to to go back to. Williams That transition that he was talking about as I was kind of I would never competed at that level, but I played college athletics and then competed at the Crossfit, at regionals. And then one day I was just. I was like, this doesn't matter. Like, nobody cares if I can do this or not. And then I was just for whatever reason, oddly at peace with that. I was just like, okay, now, now I want to be good at helping other people. Right. And then do you guys have anybody in the show, like does anybody in that community? I know you guys probably don't because you don't emphasize it. But do people come to you guys knowing your high level athletes and want to compete?

Miranda Alcaraz:
We'll have to actually had somebody reach out this week who is a father of four and has a full time job that you'd like to compete. And he's a member and is doing street parking gonna be enough. And I had to just go back to him and say, well, there's a lot of follow up questions. When say you compete. You mean like at like a local throw down or you can like you're trying to go compete at the Crossfit, games? Like there's a very big difference. We're still huge supporters and a lot of our members go and compete in local competitions. They post, they'll get street parking teams together and they'll go where? And there's street parking shirts and they do it.

Miranda Alcaraz:
I mean, I'm such a huge supporter of that because it pushes people get fired up and there's community within that as well. But he came back and said that he thought it'd be cool to compete in the games. And so my next follow up question was why? Like you have a great job and you have four kids and what what is it? And he honestly said that he he was under the impression that to be a good coach, you had to compete at a high level. And so then that started a whole new conversation. I would say that most of those people competing are not great coaches because it's all one hundred percent. You're thinking about yourself and you're so you're dialing in on the skills. So in such a small way that you have a hard time even wrapping your brain around what a brand new person needs to hear is going through. So I would say more than anything, we have former. A lot of former like team, no big name like former games, athletes, individuals.

Miranda Alcaraz:
But we have a lot of people who competed at regionals in the games on teams, especially moms who are members. And I mean, good luck with me ever being on the top of this parking leaderboard. Forget that. That's like who are these people. So it's great. But most of them are like we've we've joked about street parking being a competitive Crossfit, rehab because we don't care your scores are we don't look at the leaderboard. We don't celebrate who won the workout. We don't care. You know, if you sub this or that and this person has an 18 inch box and this person has a 20 inch box, like we don't look at any of that. We don't police any of that. So it's it's hard for a lot of people. And I mean, even for us, I would say more so for him because he was still competing when we started it.

Miranda Alcaraz:
It takes a while to break out of that, like looking at all the scores and saying so and so cheated or this can't be possible and just letting your work be yours. So, you know,.

Fern:
I had to when I finally decided I didn't want to be competitive anymore, I just stopped logging all my scores.

Miranda Alcaraz:
Yeah,.

Fern:
I just. It doesn't matter. I don't care. I mean, I know basically what they are. And it's like. And again, I was just like, I'm as fit as I'm ever gonna need to be any real life scenario. I got I got a lot of extra probably. And I'm like, not nearly as fit as I was four or five years ago, but I'm still pretty set for a guy who's going to be thirty nine next month. So that's all I like. What does it matter? Last piece and then I'll let you guys go, because I know you're busy, bee. What are some things you know? So again, just to give context to like 300 seminars. Been into hundreds of gyms now have this really big community. Who's giving you insight into affiliates these days? What have you guys both seen that are the marks are the hallmarks of a really good affiliate.

Julian Alcaraz:
I would say for even if it's not just to fill it anytime a walk into any business and I feel welcomed. It's like that first impression. You'll know right away because that sets the tone like, wow, that person was really nice and like, you know, just listening. I want to be listened to and heard. I would say that's gonna be first steps without overcomplicating things.

I think for the affiliates, it's obviously it can't be the way that it was when I started my gym, which was dirty and equipment, used equipment. You know, at this point, you've got to have a nicer space.

But even more important than that, because that that is important nowadays, because people are going to be able to compare. But you can have the nicest facility in the world and still have no one in it. The balance between having a good time and having a high quality professional. Program. There's got to be a balance. And you've seen the gyms where they have a great time. But there's no going on. And the program is not thought out whatsoever. But everybody loves each other. That's great. It's going to be hard to bring new people into that and show them the value there. Or you've seen super on paper looks perfect programming and fantastic as well.

As far as knowledge goes. Coaches. But no good times being had.

Like nobody's laughing.

Everybody's just like very serious and boring. You've got to find the balance between those two things. And if that means you've got to have somebody who writes the programming and somebody that person does not run the classes because they have a hard time connecting. That's fine. Don't assume that just because somebody is good at making workouts, they are good at connecting with people like those are two very different skill sets. Obviously, trying to find both of those in the same person is great. But I think that's another pitfall of a lot of gyms, is they give one or two people all of the jobs. And I get it. Like you can only afford to pay so many people. But yeah. Just balancing those two things.

It's funny you bring that up because that's before you said that. That's kind of where my mind has been lately is that, you know, I work on some of our stuff. My general manager works on some of our stuff. So I know the product that we're giving is good. But now, for whatever reason, the past couple of months, like my focus has been like for people having a good time like or do they enjoy coming here? Like, that's the only thing I give a shit about these days. I don't like. His knees are touching when he squats. I'm like, we need to fix that. However, is he having a good time? You know, like. And I don't know why, but I feel like that's just probably more important to some extent. Yes. Very cool. Last thing, do you guys. Are you guys read books at all?

We do a lot of audio books while we're driving or walking the dog.

Anything you recommend for the listeners?

Oh, man. My three top books. I'm actually listening to one of them again right now. Three topics recently were atomic habits, the art of not giving a fuck up and start with why Simon act up. Yes, those are the lead in the last like six months that I've really loved.

I'm going to go with, for starters, four agreements. OK. The Alchemist and third, start with why? Because you got to figure out who you are and what you truly want and then understand your why for doing it so or agreements allows you understand yourself. Alchemist What your journey, your personal journey is and what you're legend. You want to be left behind and then start with y purpose.

Let's start with why is it I wrote that book twice and every time I finished reading it, I think I figured it out. And then I start asked. I'm like, I don't know why I'm doing this. I start requestioning myself over and over again, which I sometimes I think I'm like, that's what I should be doing. But then sometimes I think I'm a crazy person, so I don't know. Cool. So where can people find you guys? What are all obviously street barking? But like social Instagram, anything else, you guys? I'm going on.

Yes, so I'm at Fearless Maranda on Instagram, our street parking is at street parking. He's at 0 0 9 billion. That's with a J. By the way, J U Street parking dot com. And yeah.

Yeah.

Cool. If you guys are listening to this and you haven't checked it out, I highly recommend it. I've been following you guys for a while. I really dig a lot of things you guys are doing. And, you know, just from a thank you from me to you guys. There's things that I've learned from you guys just virtually and like Miranda, we both worked on some of our stuff, but our paths of cross, just like we ever work together. I think we met briefly once at a train or summit once. But. But things you guys are doing, it helped me the. And we'll probably continue to for years to come. So I'm hoping that this is going to add value to a lot of listeners. So I really appreciate it. Thank you guys so much. Thank you. And thank you for having us. I appreciate that. Yup. Take care.

Quickly and accurately convert audio to text with Sonix.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp4 files to text.

Thousands of researchers and podcasters use Sonix to automatically transcribe their audio files (*.mp4). Easily convert your mp4 file to text or docx to make your media content more accessible to listeners.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2019—it’s fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your mp4 to text, try Sonix today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *