96. Adam Tar | CrossFit Northport

96. Adam Tar | CrossFit Northport

In this episode, Jason Ackerman sits down with Adam Tar, who he met about a month ago at a Level 2. Adam is the owner and head coach at Crossfit Northport, wit his wife Sarah Tarr. What really impressed Ackerman about Adam was what he is doing from a business perspective within his Box. Adam has a Master of Bussision Admisionton, which he stated has not only allowed him to be the most expensive box in his area but also have a soild membership base of 100 members. Adam takes a very hard approach within his box, where he coaches 90% of classes, has very hard but ultimately fair internship program, and hold value in contacts to ensure his busiion stay alive. They discuss all of that but also topic like Grandingfathering in, going to court over contracts and my EFT should be your membership method of collecting. This may seem like some hard issue ot face for many of us as box owners but Ackerman and Adam example why they are so important mostly because it’s allowing you to ensure your future. 

Timestamps:

(6:36) Pricing 
(9:56) Price increase
(11:33) Grandfathering
(20:31) Contacts
(31:28) Shifting focus from the number of members to the value of the members
(32:28) Taking someone to court 
(44:33) Last min tips 

Recommend Book:

Psychology of Selling: Increase Your Sales Faster and Easier Than You Ever Thought Possible – Brian Tracy

Sell or Be Sold – Grant Cardone

Never Split the Difference – Chris Voss

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Ackerman :
All right, Adam, I wonder if you and I meet was it Crossfit, TamMiami at your level, two? Correct?

Adam Tar:
It was that was what was it about a month ago now.

Ackerman :
Yeah, probably a little bit longer. But a little while ago I assumed since I hadn’t heard from me passed the test.

Adam Tar:
I did. I didn’t know it was questionable because first time I took my level to, there was no test. And so definitely a little bit more than I expected. But yeah, it was it was good learning experience overall, as always.

Adam Tar:
Adam was the guy at the seminar that was asking a lot of questions. But what I enjoyed about you was. It was clearly coming from a good place, and I think Fern and I talk about it a lot. Other guests I’ve had on this show. You can get away with a lot if you if you’re coming from a good place of, you know, whether it’s understanding or just want to learn more or just curiosity. And it was very clear that that’s where you were.

Adam Tar:
Yeah. The way I look at it is the day you think that you are an expert is the day you stop succeeding. So I always like to surround myself and talk with people that know more than me. Right. I think that’s what every entrepreneur tries to do, is kind of surround themselves with people who are better than they are.

Ackerman :
Every good entrepreneur.

Adam Tar:
Every good one. Yeah, that’s right.

Ackerman :
Ya there are some bad ones out there and I think they know everything. But the reason I’m having you on is for exactly that reason. You really struck me, struck me as someone that was doing some good things, not just as as a box owner, but specifically from a business perspective. That’s what impressed me. I think we’re sitting there. At the end of that first day, and we were just talking about contracts and we were talking about. All sorts of really nuanced things are you were crushing at your box, so. Give, give, give the listeners a little bit of, you know, the ups and downs of Crossfit, north north port where you are as far as you know, as much as you’re willing to disclose financially. But membership, that kind of stuff, just so they have an understanding of your background.

Adam Tar:
Right. Absolutely. So I have a background in business. I have a master’s of business administration. I kind of finished that before I drove into the Crossfit, life. Owning a box and doing that type thing. I interned with a bunch of different boxes and coached that a much different box just to kind of get a taste of things that I liked and that I didn’t like and things that I may be able to improve on. That was a big thing for me. I wanted to create a better product. I think that’s why all gym owners kind of sit out and open their own gym is because they think they can do something better. Right. And that’s why most businesses exist. They want to be the best or they want to be better than that other competitor out there. So I’ve been in business now for about six years. Like any gym or any business, we have ups and downs for sure. I think a big component of maintaining a positive trend is going to be social media based posts and good advertising and that type of thing. But the biggest thing is, is, you know, we have fluctuations just like anybody else. So I would say right now we’re sitting at around 100 members. We’re in a very small area. So it’s not like we have a huge demographic pull from. I know Naples is a little bit larger than we are. I know you’re up that way. And demographic wise, just household income is much higher than we are. So we’re kind of like the person at the gym that stands out the most just because we are the most expensive in town. And we do have a contract which is rare in our area.

Ackerman :
So let me ask you, what is your what is your membership?

Adam Tar:
So for an unlimited option. So for twelve months we’re at one hundred and seventy dollars a month.

Ackerman :
And what’s the going rate? You’re you’re kind of on the outskirts of Orlando.

Adam Tar:
No, no, no. We’re we’re down south from you. I’m sorry. Up north from you. A little bit up north. So you’re familiar with Sarasota?

Ackerman :
Yes.

Adam Tar:
Right. Yeah. So we’re right. We’re probably 15, 20 minutes south of Sarasota.

Ackerman :
Ok. So you’re not too far from me. That’s right.

Adam Tar:
Now we’re close.

Ackerman :
It’s a one one seventy five whats that. What would you say the average rate in your area is?

Adam Tar:
Man, I’ve seen and I know I just met with a box owner up your way a couple of weeks ago. I’ve seen from one forty five a month no contract on limited to one thirty five a month, unlimited no contract. And I think the guy that I met with from your way, I think who’s buddies with the owner. I believe your old gym. I think that he said he was at 150 and that just blew my mind because ten years ago when I got into Crossfit, and I was I started out and you’ll know this when I started at Crossfit, stereo.

Ackerman :
Oh, you were down here. You were. You lived down there. OK, I didn’t realize that.

Adam Tar:
Yes, I know a lot of guys in your area that we think we mutually have friends with. So anyway, I started there and they were charging one hundred and fifty almost ten years ago. Right. So it blows my mind. The prices that I see at our local level, because there’s, you know, costs have only gone up. They haven’t gone down, especially as the economy is getting better. Everything’s getting more expensive. So I think it’s interesting the approach that people were are taking with this, because this is more of a individualized service. Right. And that’s kind of, you know. You know that I’m buddies with Stu. And that’s kind of what we discuss is this is more of a personal based membership. And so as prices go up, your prices should reflect that or you’re just devaluing your service.

Ackerman :
I sold my first affiliate in 2014 and our monthly rate was 180 at the time.

Adam Tar:
Oh Wow.

Ackerman :
So, yeah, you’re absolutely right about that. But talk to the listeners, you know, if a box owner is listening. First of all, I want to say one hundred members is still very, very good. I know a lot of boxes. You’re like and we hear of the ones with five hundred. We hear that those are the outliers. I always tell box owner. If you get to a hundred members, you’re like it’s like you’re the one percent, right.

Adam Tar:
You know, stocks interrupt you still. And I talked a lot about that. Right. Because, you know, Jason Khalifa’s model is one hundred members per thousand square feet. That is a lot of members and maybe in a major city. But yeah, I would say that that’s tough to accomplish those higher, higher numbers.

Ackerman :
Yeah, you could do like stupid box math of like one hundred members times this. But, But really if you have one hundred members and and you’re running your business smart, you can make a good living. You know if you’ve provided yourself and hopefully one or two other people, you know, a solid career there. What was your process to come up with that one sevity.

Adam Tar:
That’s a good question. That’s that’s one that everybody has I think. You know, when I started off, it was much like a lot of box owners. Right. I kind of didn’t pay attention to the business knowledge that I had. I kind of looked at the surrounding market rates and I knew I wanted to be higher. I will never be the cheapest gym in town. And that’s that’s for sure. I’ll always be the most expensive. But I started kind of at that that baseline at the time. So when I started, I don’t I don’t know how much you remember. I’m sure you do. Was back in. Let’s see. We opened in 2013 and the economy was still rocky. It was just starting to come out of that recession that we had. And so I kind of just wanted to play it safe. And then from there, I just went up five dollars a year, annual increases to kind of get where we’re at today. And that’s a problem that a lot of gym owners have is not doing annual increases because they’re afraid of how their members are going to take it. But if you do in small steps, it’s no more than a cup of coffee, you know, a day or a week rather.

Ackerman :
Well, a month, really, right. It’s five dollars a month. So one thing I don’t want to brush over is how important is your MBA and your success as a box owner?

Adam Tar:
That’s a tough question, right, because I don’t think everyone has to get an education to be good at business, and we’ve seen that time and time again with some major, major CEOs that are uneducated. But for me personally, it’s been everything for me because it allows me to think critically on how I’m operating my business and kind of strategize and forecast my sales and my marketing. Right. And, you know, it’s it’s weeks it wakes you up to the fact that this is this is a relationship business. But we can’t forget it’s a business. Right. And that’s what a lot of box owners forget, that we’re running a business in without the finances. This business won’t be around.

Ackerman :
Yeah. As you were saying that it kind of made me think it almost helps you remove the. Personal stuff out of it. And I look at it as a business where I didn’t have an MBA and it was really very emotionally charged all my decisions were not so much I should look at it as how did I run this business? I think in an ideal world, most box owners would have some sort of business background, but that’s not always the case. And you can you could certainly learn as you go with, you know, things such as this episode. Right. So.

Adam Tar:
Right. Then there’s absolutely there’s so many tools out there, so much free content that, you know, not being educated can assist you with that. That’s the Facebook form. I mean, that that can be a dangerous place. I see you posting in there from time to time, you know, but it can be a dangerous place because you have a lot of people just kind of putting their their their thoughts, you know, without having any background to do it. But there’s tons of good podcasts like this one providing tons and tons of value out there for free.

Ackerman :
I mean, this Stu great. And I mean, know, all the people out there are putting stuff out, you know, like you’re saying, be careful. You’re listening to. I think it’s always it’s like anything. The reason Stu was good is because he’s done it right. You know, there’s a lot of the is good because you’ve done it. You don’t have to be. We know we’ve talked about it on a recent episode. You have to be the best athlete to be the best coach. But it helps if you understand what it’s like to play the game.

Adam Tar:
That’s right.

Ackerman :
So. Let’s let’s talk about these rate increases. You do five dollars a month. You know, you increase your monthly rate by five dollars every year regardless of anything.

Adam Tar:
For the most part, this is the first year that we didn’t do a price freeze, which is unique because we just purchased our building in November. We typically do a price raise in January of every year. What is my logic behind not raising my prices? You know, I don’t have a lot of logic behind it. It just didn’t feel right. If that makes sense,.

Ackerman :
Thats Alright.

Adam Tar:
I gut, my gut just told me so. In business, there’s something called market equilibrium. And I don’t know if you’re familiar with it. So.

Ackerman :
I can figure I figured it out with the two words you said. You’re gonna get it from the same, if you like. You kind of put yourself where you needed to be. And if you go too far, you’re going to skew that balance, if you will.

Adam Tar:
That’s right. So the market in the market aspect, there’s only so much the consumer’s willing to spend before it starts having a negative effect overall on the business. Now, I don’t think I’m there yet and I don’t think I’m anywhere close to it. But, you know, we made a lot of changes, a lot of changes all at once. So I didn’t want to say, oh, here we just opened a brand new facility for you guys after years and years of support. And now we’re gonna up.you you again. So I don’t know. It just didn’t feel right for the price raise. Now that we will be a price raise again next year in January. So it will only be $5. So it’s not going up 10.

Ackerman :
You like to go on just a a set dollar amount vs. a percentage. You know, similar to, you know, just cost of living.

Adam Tar:
Yeah. It’s you know, I just want it to be small enough where, you know, it doesn’t hurt people, but it brings some extra revenue to the gym. So one thing that Stu kind of woke me up to and you’re going to hear me probably mention his name a lot because he woke me up to a lot of things. And I think it’s a lot of difficult changes that box owners are afraid to make. One of those is grandfathering. Right.

Ackerman :
I think I was very guilty of that. Yes.

Adam Tar:
And I think we all are right. Again, that goes back to the relationship kind of aspect of it. But not only that, it’s historical. Right. So, gym, you have been doing that since the beginning of time. And, you know, it’s a mistake. It’s a mistake that has just continued so much. gym, over after gym owner needs to stop. Right. Because as the economy improves or if it doesn’t improve. Right. Those rates are going to change. And we need to be aware of that. And just because you’re loyal to a product doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t have that additional price increase. Right. It’s that’s a big thing like your cell phone bill. It’s going to go up from month to month. Right. Cable. It’s going to change after that year contract or however long a period you sign, it’s going to change based off the economy.

Adam Tar:
And I think that’s a big thing we need to pay attention to. Is that so we stop grandfathering in altogether and we do minimal price increases based off of our membership size. Five dollars is really enough to kind of just help bring in some extra cash flow just to put towards equipment and, you know, other investments into the gym.

Ackerman :
So let me take a second and talk about Grandfathering And we. When I open, I believe our opening rates for 80 dollars a month in 2007 is about 2011. At twelve, our rate was about 150. And I had a coaching staff and they were still grandfathered in. And part of it was talking with Chris Cooper at the time. And part of it was my coach, Kevin. He’s like, I need to make more. And as I, Kevin, love to hear the numbers. And it was his idea. And I was like, all right, you make it happen, Kevin. Like, he was my Full-Time guy. We became good friends. He made it happen. And, you know, we didn’t. I tell the story. We didn’t lose anybody, a substantial increase. But it was it was needed to keep the business afloat.

Adam Tar:
Right. And that was a tough time for you, especially because that was back in the day when when you mentioned Crossfit,, you almost didn’t want to talk about it because it was so hard to explain to somebody, you know, and a lot of people didn’t know what it was. And today, obviously, due to the games and you know, just how big it’s gotten that that kind of factors gone. So it’s much easier for gyms now or even a couple years ago versus when you started.

Ackerman :
So well. It is understood what small group training costs. I remember eighty dollars. I was embarrassed to tell people of the price. And this is so much I understand. But when you come three or four times a week to a class of eight, it was priceless.

Adam Tar:
Absolutely.

Ackerman :
A couple of things I want to touch. We have, you know, specific topics where we’re going to talk about a year contracts, but. You every time you say something in my way, I want to hear you own your building.

Adam Tar:
That’s right.

Ackerman :
So that’s unique in this world.

Adam Tar:
It is. You know, and then again, not to keep referencing Stu, but he’s helped me out a lot. So he kind of gave me the motivation to kind of go out and do it right. So something unique with me. And a lot of gym owners aren’t going to want to live my life. Right? I am pretty much I have one additional coach. My wife’s coach as well. She coaches very little. We have three kids.

Ackerman :
Right. So we and we can dive into that. Mean, I work in my wife. I mean, that’s. But go on. Yeah.

Adam Tar:
Right. So the point is, is I only have one additional coach. And why is that? Every dollar that I earn, I want to continue to reinvest into my facility. And there’s a lot of people that, you know, it’s do and I kind of talked about this in our last conversation was that a lot of, you know, you don’t own a business until you can step away. Which I don’t necessarily agree with that. Right. He says you have a job and it it is a job. But I’m at the end of the day, when you own your assets and you continue to invest into those assets, that’s yours. Right. And nobody can take that away from you. So I’d rather work myself. A lot of classes teach all the classes if I have to. And then continually reinvest because it’s just better for my clients. It’s a better experience. And that’s what we’re all about doing here is creating a great customer experience.

Ackerman :
Isn’t that the McDonald’s model as well?

Adam Tar:
Right. They just have a lot more money than we do.

Ackerman :
I mean, one day I’ll get there and it’s it’s like owning your own home, Keto mine, fixing the wall, putting in a new door, the garden, because, you know, you’re investing in something that one day you’ll sell regardless of what happens to Crossfit, Northport, you have an appreciating arts asset now.

Adam Tar:
That’s right. Yeah. And not to talk. Go, ahead.

Ackerman :
No, the other thing I was going to say is just looking at you, you’ve professionalized that as well. It appears like you’re dressed up to coach.

Adam Tar:
Yes. And you mentioned that. I remember we were at the seminar that weekend.

Ackerman :
Yeah, you had you lululemon shirt on.

Adam Tar:
Yeah, I came in with Lululemon Blue Polo, and we have everything embroidered in with our logo and all of our coaches wear polos. Now, there are some days credit that, you know, somebody didn’t do their laundry and they missed a shirt or whatever that happens. But always are Crossfit, attire, always Crossfit,, northport for attire, because it’s a business, it’s a brand. If you go into an L.A. fitness, you’re going to see something fitness related on that staff guaranteed.

Ackerman :
You mentioned coaches. Is your wife the only coaches? She’s the only paid coach.

Adam Tar:
No, no, no. She’s actually. She only comes in kind of when I need her. I have one other coach that’s part time. He’s kind of like my savior when I need him, if you will. So he works. Let’s see. One class a week and then he takes our 5 a.m. fundamentals training sessions. So he’s not working full time right now. I’d like to get him to that eventually. I’m not sure he wants to get to that point, but that would be the at the end goal. So I don’t have a lot of staff, but it comes down to the quality of of my coaching as well. If somebody can’t produce a quality product, I’m not going to put them out there. And I feel like a lot of gyms do that. They’re not as focused on the quality of their coaching or coaches and would rather just throw somebody out there so they don’t have to coach a class. And I’m not a big believer in that.

Ackerman :
Hundred percent. I mean, how many how many hours do you coach? A day. A week.

Adam Tar:
Do you really want to know that? So I start I start at 5:00 a.m. So we do personal training first. That’s our model. I kinda took that from Stu again. Right. So we do five sessions, all one on one. And I’ll typically start if my coach can’t cover around 5 a.m. that I have a 6:00 a.m. class, then I have a 7:00 a.m. fundamentals, an eight 40 class and then a 10:00 a.m. fundamentals and then four, five, six and seven at night.

Ackerman :
And you coach almost all of those, if not all?

Adam Tar:
pretty much all of them, except on a

Ackerman :
in a hole in the grand spectrum of the world. I’d say you got a good job, right?

Adam Tar:
Yeah, absolutely.

Ackerman :
But it is a lot of hours and you can see why that was what I was doing when I opened it. It’s like first person to get to your level one. I don’t think they had it. I was just like, you can coach. Right. And then you see where that’s happening. And I think that the world of Crossfit, coaches are being developed. And it’s still when you were at your level, two, you see what’s going on right now. You see that? Yeah. You leave your level one. And if you’re not getting developed, you come back to take your level two and you’re still a really bad coach. Not your fault. You’re not working on. It would be like trying to get your MBA and not studying, not reading a book. You’re not going to pass the tests. So it’s impressive that you coach so much. But we we do understand why people are putting in subpar coaching and they need to work on developing them.

Adam Tar:
Absolutely. So we have a part of them started to we have a part of our process for getting started as a coach and internship process. We actually somebody going through it right now. And that’s six months doesn’t. Guarantee you’re going to coach at all. You have to work a minimum of six hours per week and it starts off with just shadowing. You’re not doing anything. You’re not talking. You’re just observing. That’s it. Right. So we start them there and then gradually they start to kind of increase in capacity and what they’re doing within the class. But we start off really slow. It’s a learning experience. I tell them straight up, like, look, this is not going to get you a class. You’re not going to get a membership discount just because you’re interning. It’s not going to happen. The value in this is knowledge and a level 1 course. As good as it is, it’s not going to be as valuable as this because it’s hands on training. It’s a lot more hours than you’re going to get from those two days. Right. So that’s what we start off with. If they do well and I put them through a stress test at the end where I slam a class and they have to finish on time, make all that scaling modifications needed for individuals and have no problems. Ya know, perfect finish. And so I’ll put them through the wringer a little bit. But if they pass, then, you know, we’ll pay for their level one to kind of go into it.

Ackerman :
And that’s probably not probably that’s really great if someone is actually looking to make this a career and learn. What better way than to be immersed in it exactly as you’re doing now? The topic I really wanted to dive into because this is I think you and I were sitting there and I remember talking about contracts. And, you know, my I think what happened was you told me that contracts and I was like, yeah, but anyone can break them at any time. Have you ever sued anyone? And you were like, yeah. So so so let’s talk let’s talk about that a lot of boxes have contracts and I say contracts with kind of quotes because they’re not really meant to be upheld.

Adam Tar:
Yes. That’s right.

Ackerman :
So there’s there’s, you know, the contracts like you would get your typical gym, your L.A. fitness, where you cant breach this contract and if you do, you’re going to owe X amount of dollars and a lot of boxes just kind of put it out there and they discount all of these tiers of time. But at the end of the day, they’re not going to follow up anyway. So what’s the point by you, on the other hand, have actually sued your members or ex members, I should say? If they if they try to breach the contract. So give me the whole story of this.

Adam Tar:
The whole story. Well,.

Ackerman :
Why whyy you started with contracts and how you got to where you are.

Adam Tar:
Right. So let’s take a look at the principle behind the contract. Right. If I if somebody signs a 12 month, let’s say, agreement, they are going to receive a discount from my regular rates. So our drop in for, say, a one hour class, if somebody didn’t sign any contract, would be twenty five dollars.

Ackerman :
Somebody comes the one time I come into town. Twenty five dollars. No.

Adam Tar:
Twenty five dollars.

Ackerman :
No. By t shirt. Right. I hate that whole thing. It costs you this much to take class. Our t shirts are extra. All right.

Adam Tar:
Right. And that’s a problem that’s Crossfit, gyms have continued like it’s we need to wake up its business owners. There’s a cost to everything. And I’m not going to give you a T-shirt for free. I appreciate you coming to our gym, but you won’t get a T-shirt free.

Ackerman :
And that’s gonna be my snippet for this episode. Just say no.

Adam Tar:
I like it.

Ackerman :
So you got the drop in rate of twenty five. What’s next?

Adam Tar:
All right. So the way I look at it is if I’m going to give you a discount and that discount, if you look on our Web site, you’ll kind of see it. And I think you’re looking at right now, you’ll kind of see it broken down price per class. Right. So you’ll see as the commitment level goes up, the price of the class will reduce. And you’re getting that discount. I’m devaluing my service. Because you’re committed to twelve months. Right. So a lot of people aren’t going to pay or to 20th month rate for unlimited classes, which is discounted down from our rate slightly, but it’s still two hundred twenty dollars a month. We do have several people who pay that who don’t want to be put into a commitment. So we’re not forcing people into contracts. It’s not like that’s their only option is to sign a contract. That’s just if they want the best price, they’re going to have to commit to it. Right. So if I give somebody a discount, say, let’s say this on a year, at twelve months, I give them a discount. Now they’re getting a discounted class if I don’t enforce that. Now I’m out of that money right now. They’ve had all of those months of service. They had six months of service that was discounted and now they default on their contracts. And now I’m out a lot more money than just the cost of the contract. Right.

Ackerman :
Yeah. Yeah. So first of all, your website is beautiful. So, guys, I check out Crossfit, northbourne dot com. I don’t know if you did this yourself for.

Adam Tar:
No, I have a good graphic designer that. And this is what I use.

Ackerman :
It’s a very good Web site and it’s laid out super well as far as the pricing. So many Web sites in across the world. It’s like we travel a lot and I want to figure out their schedule. This is like impossible. Right? Keep it simple now. But what you said, you know, you’re devaluing. Is that the right word there?

Adam Tar:
So if you’re just doing what, a monthly rate, that’s at one forty five without a commitment.

Ackerman :
Well, you say your month to month unlimited is 220, right?

Adam Tar:
220 a month.

Ackerman :
You commit to 12 months it’s 170. Maybe it’s just semantics. You said, hey, I’m devaluing. I would say you’re not devaluing what you’re offering. A.

Adam Tar:
Reduced rate.

Ackerman :
Reduced rate because they’re committing to you, right? No different than so many subscription Web sites or anything. You pay nineteen ninety nine a month or if you commit to a year it comes out to twelve ninety nine. But you’re right. So the point being if you tell me you’re gonna do a 12 month contract, four months in. You want to quit while you’ve saved yourself $50 a month. Two hundred dollars over that period of time.

Adam Tar:
Right. I think that’s a better way to word it there.

Ackerman :
But but but the challenges. All right. Most box owners just kind of chalk it up to me, because when I said to you, I was like, all I have to do is call Chase and be like, hey, don’t let these guys charge my card anymore.

Adam Tar:
Right. And it’s a little bit more difficult to do that when it comes to a bank account. That’s one of the other beauties of using. So and we don’t really talk about that, but we use the automatic bank withdraw.

Ackerman :
ABT?

Adam Tar:
The ABT, we don’t allow credit cards or debit cards or anything like that.

Ackerman :
And for box owners listening, you pay less of a percentage on that as well.

Adam Tar:
That’s right, significantly less. We had almost a thousand dollars a month in credit card and debit card transaction fees.

Ackerman :
So for your listening ideas that make if you make that change, you just saved yourself. A thousand dollars is not unrealistic.

Adam Tar:
Right. And, you know, it’s a scary kind of approach to take. And I was afraid to take it at first. And, you know, I had some guidance there and push me in the right direction. And it saved us a ton of money.

Ackerman :
Let me guess it was Stu?

Adam Tar:
It was Stu good guess. Yes.

Ackerman :
So What was scary about that?

Adam Tar:
A lot of changes, right? So we did everything at once and we ticked a lot of people off and sometimes you just have to be OK with that as a business. And a lot of corporations do that every single day. Right. So what did we do all at once? We automatically stopped honoring grandfathering in Price’s old prices. We stopped that right. We allowed people to finish out their contract. That term they had left in their contract at that grandfathered rate, which we don’t have to the way our contracts was written.

Ackerman :
But that’s fair. Like that.

Adam Tar:
Yeah. Yeah, it’s fair. Because, you know, they committed to that. It would be wrong for us to kind of back away from that. Right. So once that was done, though, current rates would apply. We remove teachers’ discounts room, remove fire, no first responder discounts get real. All of that and military discount,.

Ackerman :
No discounts?

Adam Tar:
Only discount. We have couples discounts. That’s the only reason I do that is because you have a lot of money coming out of one household. Right. It’s two people from one.

Ackerman :
What’s the discount on that?

Adam Tar:
I’d have to do the math. I can tell you,.

Ackerman :
10, 10 percent, 15 percent, thing it.

Adam Tar:
Right around there. Yeah, right around there. So it says please inquire for information.

Ackerman :
And I think that’s fair. You know. I don’t think there’s a right or wrong whether you want to discount LCL firefighter or military teachers. You can go crazy. It’s like all you discount teachers, but they’re people. And I love teachers. My mom’s a teacher. I used to offer discount, but. What about the people that are working their ass off at McDonald’s that can afford that? Where do you draw the line?

Adam Tar:
And that’s a good point you just brought up, because especially with the first responders discount, we have a lot of physicians that come to our gym and we had physicians that were mad because they weren’t getting a discount and first responders were right. And they made a good point. Right. Why are first responders getting a discount when I save people every day as well? Maybe in a different way. Why am I not getting a discount? And then it gets to the point where when is enough? Enough, right. If Starbucks, a multi billion dollar company, can’t afford to give discounts, why can I afford to make to give these discounts when I’m only making six figures a year? In terms of the gym.

Ackerman :
And you were saying all these changes you made, I think to some extent it was like just ripping off the Band-Aid, probably better than, hey, Adam, you hit us with this change three months ago. Now this change. Here it is. Did you lose any members?

Adam Tar:
Absolutely.

Ackerman :
I wasn’t expecting that. How many did you lose?

Adam Tar:
Not a lot. Not a lot. So.

Ackerman :
A couple?

Adam Tar:
A couple and we lost a couple of our our original members there. Right. So in the way I looked at. So we lost about discount, such based on that, we lost about eight or nine members. I want to say, which was kinda disappointing because these are people that are with you from the beginning five, five years or so. Right. And then they decide to leave. And, you know, you kind of feel upset about it as a gym owner and these relationships build. But at the end of the day, they didn’t see the value that I brought to the table. And if they didn’t see the value I felt on my part or B, they just didn’t care about it anymore. They don’t care about coaching. They don’t care about the facility. They just want a cheap place to work out and get a sweat on, which is cool if they want to do that. No problem. But this isn’t the place for it.

Ackerman :
That’s what I was going to say. And you’ve answered as I say, well, whose fault is that? And you took the ownership, right? If if they’re willing to leave, it’s it’s mutual, right? It’s right. They need to see it. But I would guess even if you lost nine people, you far exceeded that with what you brought in.

Adam Tar:
Absolutely. Yeah. Those price increases and price changes made up for all those people that were lost and then moving forward. It was just easy from the beginning,.

Ackerman :
You know, which is goes back to what we talked about the beginning. It’s like you have 100 members, but if they’re all paying full price, you don’t need 200 members. You don’t need, you know. You know, it’d be nice, right. But there’s a number where. All right. I need 100 hundred people paying full price. And have we when I did my increases, like we had 500 members, but some were paying 80. I’d rather get rid of them, have the space. So when someone new comes in willing to pay 180. It’s not a not a problem in class sizes or equipment. I’d rather have all my members. And that’s part of it as well. You’re discounting people. They’re all using the same equipment. They’re all using the same floor space, taking the same bandwidth from me as a coach. Why are they getting a discount? You go to the movies, you get a seat. We’re all paying the same thing.

Adam Tar:
That’s right. Yeah, that was my biggest thing there. It’s just we have to. The discounts have to stop. And I hope if anybody hears this and the grandfathering, we need to put a stop to grandfathering in. A lot of people, like all my members are going to be ticked off. That’s not right. I promised my members they’d have this for life, but it’s nice enough.

Ackerman :
So I do not. Yeah, mine was it. They were my first people. I mean, the box wasn’t even open and I was like, if you want us to stay in business, we have to get rid of this. And I did a couple of things where they can pay up front similar to you, like write out their contract. It wasn’t like you’re going from a 180, but it was. We need to make a change. Go ahead.

Adam Tar:
So kind of touching back on client numbers because I heard you talk about that. We need to be less focused with the amount of members that we have and focus more on the value of that member. Right. How much money they’re spending within a month. I’d much rather have 80 members and have their average client value over three hundred a month than have all those other members back, you know, for that little bit of money. And you’ll tend to see that the people that are safe rooms in your case, paying eighty five dollars a month, they’re going to be less likely to take on other services you may have. by-products you may have that are are fairly pricey, right.

Ackerman :
They’re just shittier members. Let’s put it is that the people that want discounts are your worst members,.

Adam Tar:
Right?

Ackerman :
Yeah. And I think Cooper calls it average revenue per member your arm and whether it’s selling supplements or in your case, probably doing more personal training. That’s the goal. And the truth is, if I’m eight, you know, every additional member is just a headache, you know, whether it’s an email, whether it’s in class. It’s just more people to herd. Less people paying more. The more they pay. And it’s it’s not like you’re a better person, but they’re better members,.

Adam Tar:
Right? Absolutely. And it’s better for everyone all around.

Ackerman :
So take me through the first time you had to actually take someone to court over a contract.

Adam Tar:
So the first time I went to court, I did it by myself. Right. So that was a learning experience altogether. I filed of all the paperwork, went to mediation. Watch somebody cry in front of me that I you had a relationship with. And I pretty much had to tell them, like, look, you know, I valued your membership, you being at our facility. But I also realized that I have kids. Right. And by you not paying and you committing, you were taking food out of my kids’ mouths. And that’s just being real. I’m a small business owner. I’m not a big, you know, five gyms in, you know, type business. Here I have one gym and every dollar we bring in is important. And so I tried to kind of relate emotionally on that end with with the client because they were in a similar situation. But at the end of the day, she didn’t want to settle. And contracts are contracts. And if you breach your contracts, a lot more money is going to apply. Right. Interest, attorney’s fees, which at that point than I did get an attorney. Court costs and all of the time spent on it. So it’s in everybody’s best interest just to kind of. You know, settle up. Right.

Ackerman :
So do you remember what you wound up getting for that?

Adam Tar:
It was so it was a year contract. I want to say the first one was fairly, very new into our business. So it was the first year that we opened. I’ve been. So I set an example from the start. Because you let one person go, then you know, it’s your soft everybody. And I think they can get out of it. So I made a statement from the beginning that this isn’t going to fly. But we’re very upfront, too, with our contracts. We tell people we don’t do cancellations. We don’t do buyouts. Bottom line.

Adam Tar:
Yes. I don’t for one second thing. This is like. There’s a bunch of small fine print at the bottom. It’s obvious. And because of that, it’s like. So if you don’t like that, here’s the six month option and here’s a month a month option. You don’t have to do this.

Adam Tar:
Right. And that’s something we tried to be very clear about when in doubt. Do a month. Right. You don’t have that initial savings right off the bat, but at least you’re sure. Right. So, yeah, that’s something I think people struggle with every once in a while and then get into situations where they live outside their means. But we can’t act as advisers for people in terms of that. Right. That’s on them.

Ackerman :
And to be clear, is there if someone had done a 12 month and they want to get out, is there a buyout fee? Could they? Is there a more easy way to end it than going to court?

Adam Tar:
Pay it all up fornt.

Ackerman :
Pay. So they have to pay it.

Adam Tar:
They have to pay it. And we say that right up front. We don’t allow any cancellation 0 buyouts. You are financing a membership just like you’re financing a car. That’s what we tell them. It’s just a year versus five grand.

Ackerman :
So on the flip side, if people tried to leave and been OK with that, like, hey, I accept it, I signed this contract.

Adam Tar:
So, yeah, we do have some people that they wanted to really tell us they’re leaving. No, just stop showing up. And we were very good at checking in. I have a call list every week that I follow up with on people. And some people just keep giving excuses. And, you know, those are the people have no intentions of coming back. But we try to do our part, get them in here. But, you know, they’re not going to resign and they’re honoring their agreements so long as they honor their agreement. I think a lot of people we don’t get as much of that now that our prices are higher as we did when they were lower. Right.

Ackerman :
And at the end of the 12 months they have to resign or does it rollover into another year?

Adam Tar:
No, we have to resign because normally our rates would increase.

Ackerman :
So ever every year you have to sit down with somebody. And that’s important as the box owner as well, because when that contract ends, you’re at risk now of losing a member because it’s an opportunity. To say no I’m good.

Adam Tar:
That’s right. Yes.

Ackerman :
Do you think they should do that with marriages like a one year contract?

Adam Tar:
Well, I think everybody should get a prenuptial agreement. If we’re talking on marriages,.

Ackerman :
You are definitely. Yeah. That’s your business owner. Right. Brain going on.

Adam Tar:
Yeah. My wife wasn’t too happy about that one.

Ackerman :
She is like, I have more money than you. That’s fine, though. Now, how would you recommend a box owner implement something like this? How would they get started? Because if you are going to be willing to take someone to court, your contracts have to be done properly.

Ackerman :
Absolutely. Get an attorney. No Florida statute. That’s the biggest thing. Or the statute of the state that you’re in. Right. It’s a very important thing to know. In Florida, for instance, the Department of Agriculture. Agriculture has to approve your contracts. You have to send them there. You have to show the terms. Right. They have to you to read through it. There’s certain statute that needs to be listed verbatim. Exact font exact, though, exactly the way it’s written. And it without that, your contract’s not valid. Get an attorney. That’s the best thing you could do. Back in the day when I started, I remember on the I was on the affiliate page and I asked somebody to, hey, can you send me a copy of your contract so I could take a look? And that’s what I did. And it helped me a lot. And that was kind of a basis of getting started. I later found out that there are some loopholes. We had we have had some people get get away with not paying their membership in the past, but those have been fully closed. So it’s important to talk to an attorney. Right.

Ackerman :
What are some loopholes?

Adam Tar:
What do we have? So one of the things was the state statute not being written correctly, having more than one point of contact. So it was like, if you’d like to cancel your membership, you can either email us here or send us a letter here. And it’s got to be the exact. In the state of Florida. It’s gonna be the exact same contact.

Ackerman :
For something as small as that can make a contract void. I know. Yeah. When I had my box, I had a lifetime membership and my attorney was like, you know, this is a legal right. And I was like, I did. I can’t change the wording. I get everything. I didn’t like I had to get everything done where it was. I backed up late to put money away in escrow in case all of this all crazy. But you don’t think about all these things as a small business owner.

Adam Tar:
Yeah. The state of Florida, you’re required to have a certain bond required if you have contracts. And actually, that’s false. It depends on the amount that is required upfront. So for us, because we’re over, I think it’s 10 percent of the yearly contract. We have a three hundred and seventy five dollar fee for all new people were going through their fundamentals. So it’s five private one to one sessions. I ran into that issue where it was 10 percent because I used to not be required to have a surety bonds and somebody just got it out of a contract because of that. Even though I didn’t default, I had plenty of money in our bank to kind of backup their membership for the year. It didn’t matter, right? It’s because that was more than that 10 or 15 percent or whatever it is. I don’t recall if my head down. That’s more than the contract price. So, yeah, it’s important to know your numbers, know your statute. Talk to an attorney. That’s the biggest thing I can say and enforce. If you don’t enforce, it’s nothing.

Ackerman :
And that was my point to two people. You know, I’ve done some consulting and people talk about a contract and I’m like, are you going to take these people to court? No. And I’m like, well, why are you discounting your membership? That’s my biggest gripe with it. It’s not about contracts or bad. It said, if you like, you see with Adam. He’s discounting his membership, $50 if you sign it. So if you’re going to do that, make sure you’re willing. I think there’s nothing wrong with what Adam’s doing if anyone’s listening. Some people are going to listen to this as a dick or not. He’s a business owner. And if you’re not willing to do what he’s doing, you’re probably not ready to be a business owner. I mean, in-transit there’s box owners, I’m sure are listening. And I’m telling you, this is how you’re going to your box to be successful. This is how you guarantee your box is successful in 10 years. It’s you know, you might be doing well right now. Are you going to be one of the Crossfit, affiliates thriving in twenty twenty nine? That’s the key to it.

Adam Tar:
You know, I think we need to start a new hashtag. Bring back the contract. That’s what we need. Hashtag. Bring back the contract.

Ackerman :
I like it. Has anyone left? Gone through all this and then just left you a terrible review online?

Adam Tar:
No, but here’s the thing. If they leave a review and it is false. Now, that’s a whole different lawsuit.

Ackerman :
So just like his dude went to court over this. I’m not even messing with it anymore.

Adam Tar:
Right. Usually if if it goes to court. And I mean, we always get judgment within one that we’ve only lost twice. And it was because of some bad areas in our contract that are now fixed. But, yeah, I mean, if we’re going to go to court, they see I’m not playing around and that’s not me trying to be a dick. Right. And I know some people listening will probably think, oh, he’s a dick. Like you said, I’m a business owner and I have three kids. Right. I want my business to be around the next 30 years. You know, whatever that that future will be 30 years from now. I want it here and I want to continue to grow without this growing his heart. If you want to go and sell your gym, you don’t have a contract. You just have some numbers on a piece of paper. And like, oh, yeah, I you know, I’m projecting I’m going to bring this in over the next few months. Cool. Because if I come in and I want to buy your business, I don’t care what kind of numbers you have or your current members. Because if it’s not locked in, it really doesn’t mean much to me. Just what I’m going to give you value on your equipment. That’s all you’re gonna have. Because most people don’t even own buildings. So I’ll buy your equipment. Right

Ackerman :
.That said, that’s a hundred percent true. You know, we people like I get asked all the time, but how do you value your business? And if your members can leave the day after the sale, it would be very silly to buy a business.

Adam Tar:
Absolute.

Ackerman :
Know ya, And like you said, I think. Box owners listening to this. There’s nothing wrong with making a professionalising your affiliate, whether it’s your married or whether you have kids or you’re a single person. It’s like you shouldn’t feel guilty for trying to run a successful, smart business. And we do this. I think we all do it because we love it. You know, you have an MBA. You’re training people at A.M. because you’re passionate about helping others. But you can be both. You can you can enjoy helping others and also enjoy making sure your kids are fed.

Adam Tar:
Right. And let me clear something up. Right. If somebody runs into a difficult situation, we are more than willing to work with people. And I think we need to show some empathy to an extent. Right. But at the end of the day, it’s just how much you’re going to show. So if people need some assistance, say they need to, you know, need a month or two to get caught up. We’ll give that right. And we won’t charge interest or any of that stuff. But it comes to the point where people just try to default. That’s where it becomes a problem. If you default, if you don’t let us know what’s going on. We can’t help you. And by that point, you know, we’re getting hit with fees for bounced checks. You know, our what it is. And now we’re going to have to pass it on to you. And now it’s become more of a problem. So I think you need to have a balance for sure. I think you need to show you’re willing to work with people, but don’t be afraid to enforce.

Ackerman :
Yeah. And I’m glad you said that, because I know even when we talked at the at the seminar, you said there are people that have had issues and it’s not like you’re suing a homeless person out on the street. Can’t afford your membership. Anything else. I mean, I think the three nuggets say we’ve talked about is ending the grandfathering in of memberships, switching over to an EMT versus credit card and charging a fair amount for a drop in fee. Doesn’t have to be twenty five, but it has to be. This is your payment to be in this class. Anything else is additional. Any other tips you would give to an affiliate owner? And I’m curious, I guess I’m sure you have a ton, but any I want any other good when would go about what you were gonna say?

Adam Tar:
Absolutely. Let’s let’s keep it. We’ll keep it short. Continuous improvement. That is the biggest practice that we can have, not only in our business, but in our lives. Right. Always try to continue to improve your service to your clients. We do it all the time. You know, I’d rather invest into my facility to create more value for my clients. That allows me to justify charging more also. But I’m always reinvesting. I’m always figuring out ways to improve. And you can do that. A lot of different ways, right. With equipment that you’re providing in the gym, your cleanliness, the cleanliness of your gym, which is a huge factor that people neglect little things like we have towel service at our gym. Something small, but it’s something people appreciate. Always look to create more value, especially when you’re gonna start increasing prices. You want to see the value there. And coaching is an important aspect. And no, we pride ourselves on being good coaches. But I think every box owner does that. So you need to do something that sets you apart from your market. If you go on our Web site, Crossfit, and report.com, shameless plug, you’ll see that we practice that. Right. We want people to come in here and be blown away with our facility the way it looks. We want to attract people that are willing to pay for our service. So we will continue to invest. And I recommend that all gyms do the same.

Ackerman :
Yeah. And again, we said it early, but it starts with your site. I mean, a lot of times that’s the first thing people hear. Your site is crisp. It’s clean. It’s simple to navigate you. And there’s even a video of late you’re filling, it looks like, and it clearly looks clean. So. All a lot of nuggets on there, which is it’s just awesome to see in this day and age in the Philly world. So congrats to you. I always like to ask every guest. Any book you recommend.

Adam Tar:
Yes. A couple of them actually psychology selling great book. That book has changed my business tremendously. Being confident in selling and knowing how to relate it back to somebody, that’s a very, very important thing to do in our industry. Right. We’re constantly selling, sell or be sold. The premise behind that book, you’re either selling or being sold to, and that’s going to change your mind. You know, in life in general. Right. To help you with that. Every negotiation you do. And then the other one. That’s what I just read. Never split the difference.

Ackerman :
That was a great one.

Adam Tar:
Great book. I used to love my wife. She doesn’t know.

Ackerman :
I You know, it’s funny. Same thing. It on my own in the car. His name was Chris Voss. Rich Vos,.

Adam Tar:
FBI Jr.. Yeah. he was in the FBI.

Ackerman :
A couple. Austin Malleolo, mentioned that book as well. When we interviewed him. And great, great book. I highly recommend that. I’m sure the other ones are great as well. I just happen. I’ve read that. Well, you have to coach like eight more classes today. So. That’s right. I’ll I’ll let you go. But you seem. I do want to ask you seem super regimented. What are some things you do to stay so organized in your life?

Adam Tar:
So if I had if I wasn’t on my computer, I’d give you a script, a little screenshot. I have a glass whiteboard to the left of me. It has my projected sales for the month. I have a nice checkmark by it because I’ve fortunately accomplished it this month at the end of the month.

Ackerman :
Nice job.

Adam Tar:
We’re at the end of the month, right? I always try to. Every time I beat my sales goal, I increase it every month. So I think that’s an important thing. Always reach your goals.

Ackerman :
That’s tough. It is tiny. Your fran time. Now you’re gonna do better. Right.

Adam Tar:
But this is a lot easier. So I just have a whiteboard. I write everything on it. I have personal training sessions. I’ve done for the month a number of sign ups, fundamentals, nutrition, sign ups. I have daily tasks like, oh, do an Instagram post each day, gets programming done, follow up your calls and then I have a lot of stuff in my calendar. It’s very important to have a good scheduling system. We use our calendars for the business and it kind of integrates. It shows any potential clients and current clients slots you have available and automatically adjusts. I’m sure you’re familiar with it.

Ackerman :
Yeah. That’s what we use commonly.

Adam Tar:
Yeah. It’s a great, great service. Write everything down, you know, schedule it out in your phone. We have so much technology. We just need to use it to stay organized and successful. Just follow it.

Ackerman :
You have one of my mentors used to say to me, the mind is for thinking you pen is for remembering B, your phone. I mean, I use my phone as well. It’s like you want to clear that bandwidth and it can be something insignificant. I write it down just so it’s like one less thing to think about. What about your own training? You find time everyday.

Adam Tar:
Who? That’s a tough question. So not to make it too long, but. So when I first started off, just like a lot of gym owners, I wanted to try to make it to the games. Yes, we all laugh and smile.

Adam Tar:
But that’s the era. Let’s say that you work out.

Ackerman :
I laugh because I saw you workout

Adam Tar:
. Thanks. I appreciate that. So, yeah, nowadays it’s not anywhere near the same. I used to train two hours a day religiously doing competitive program and all that type of stuff did not focus on my business as much as I should have. And because of that, I didn’t grow the way I should have. Right. So now within I would say the last two and a half years, I’ve shift focus and now I’m lucky to work out twice, maybe three times a week on a good week because I’m that much more focused on my business. You know, instead of trying to make it to regionals, which never was gonna happen for me, I’d need to focus on something that was right there in front of me that I’ve already invested my life into, which was my business. Right. So now my main focus isn’t my fran time. It’s how many members I set up this month. Did I beat my last month’s sales? Setting those goals just like a PR and trying to beat it every month is much more rewarding than a faster fran to me at least.

Ackerman :
Happy wife, happy life. I’m sure she’s appreciative of that. And it’s not as if you’re not fit. You know, you still are two to three times a week, really, at the end of the day. And it’s all you need.

Adam Tar:
That’s all you need. I mean, emotionally, just from where I was at before and the numbers I hit before, I think that’s hard for all of us. But I’m also getting older now, too. So I need to realize that what’s important. Right. I think we have to.

Ackerman :
And I think you could probably be honest with yourself. You can probably find another hour if you really wanted to right?

Adam Tar:
So Opportunity costs. That’s another little tidbit we’ll throw. So any hour that I spend working out and I try to make at least three hours a week is an hour of lost revenue. Right. So I could fill that with a personal training session.

Ackerman :
I mean, this would be the last question.

Adam Tar:
Yeah.

Ackerman :
Can you take that? I mean, you could take that to the extreme. You could like, hey, kids, I’ll see you in a month that he’s gonna go to work. Right. Like at what point were. How does a box owner, how does Adam find that balance? Whereas that cut off.

Adam Tar:
So I wouldn’t say I have found that balance it blatantly honest with you. Right. So my wife, I would say, takes a lot of responsibility on for our kids every single day. So she’s full. She works full time. She. She’s a district job district manager for a big bank. Right. So she’s traveling a lot. And then she picks her kids up from daycare. Does all the stuff. She comes down to the gym, does a quick workout, and then she’s taking care of the kids the rest of the night. So I try to shoot for one evening off a week. But when I’m busy like we are now, I don’t take any time. The first vacation I’ve had in over two years was this past weekend and it was extremely hot and a terrible idea. We went to Disney.

Ackerman :
That’s not a vacation,

Adam Tar:
That not vacation, especially with young kids. Do you have kids?

Ackerman :
I don’t have kids no.

Ackerman :
But I’ve been to disney.

Adam Tar:
I’ll let you borrow my kids for the weekend. You can see the experience.

Ackerman :
That’s why you’re at the box so much.

Adam Tar:
That’s right. So you have finding the balance. I mean, I’m not happy with where I’m at. Yes, I do. I don’t know if I’ll ever be happy with where I’m at, because the minute we’re happy is the minute we start to fall behind in my mind. Right. So I know you’ve listened to Gary Vee. I’m sure you have. I like a lot of his stuff. You know, I don’t think it should always be nonstop work. But right now, I’m young. I have plenty of time to not work when I’m older, so.

Ackerman :
Yeah. I mean, hey, I love what you’re saying. I think, you know, you finding some balance would be great. But I also hate for 10 years when I own my boxes. I was the same way. Cost me plenty of relationships, but I wouldn’t be where I am today. And I think you’re doing it right. And it’s it’s awesome to see. I hope everybody listening really benefited from this. If I were a box owner, I’ve been taking notes, something that some really great stuff with it out there.

Adam Tar:
Well, I appreciate you having me on here. It was a pleasure. Just for people listening.

Ackerman :
Check out the site Crossfit, Northport. What’s the Instagram @ Crossfit Northport.

Adam Tar:
That’s right, at Crossfit Northport.

Ackerman :
And do you have a personal one?

Adam Tar:
Yeah, but when I’ve it’s I don’t even use that thing. So.

Ackerman :
I’m was going to say.

Adam Tar:
On our page any add.

Ackerman :
Because you have some great stuff. So is your they can e-mail you. Right. I think your phone number was on there as well. So the specific questions you can always reach out.

Adam Tar:
Yes. That goes directly to me. It’s a business line, but everything goes right to me. Oh, one other thing. Just want to add in there real quick. I know we’re short on time and this is kind of what happened with that box sort of from your way that came down itemized everything. Itemization is key right now. It’s key if you want to run a business and you’re short on staff and don’t have a lot of staff like me, automation. That’s where you guys need to be at. That’s the best thing I think I could recommend for anyone, you know?

Ackerman :
Probably a lot of you listen to I listen to it’s eliminate automate delegates. And I’d say one thing to throw on top of that is too many people automate things that should be eliminated. Right. Eliminate a. Yeah. And then you should be automating everything. Right. Good stuff that. And I really appreciate. This was great.

Adam Tar:
Yeah. I appreciate you having me on. Maybe we can do it. Yes,

Ackerman :
That’s notarization is. I’m sure we can have you on numerous times and not run out of things to talk about. We have defined time in your day. I’d rather you work out during this hour, but.

Adam Tar:
Three hours is all I need..

Ackerman :
Thank you so much, Adam. Have a good rest of the day.

Adam Tar:
You too, man. Take care.

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