99. Stuart Brauer | Guess who’s back

99. Stuart Brauer | Guess who’s back

In this episode, Fern chats with for the Stu Brauer, who has been mentioned numerous times in different episodes by many guests. This is Stu second time being on the podcast first was with Jason. This time they look at the issue facing gym owners how do you get more athletes in the box? And how it may look like the company have the magical recipe to get those people through your door with click funnels course etc does it really works? And if so could you handle the demand? On the other hand, if you don’t want to use these programmes or business to get people thought the door, with facebook and Instagram algorithm can you really push out content and it is being seen? – these question and much more is covered.  

Time Stamping:

(5:37) Copyrighting
(14:05) Cross-Posting
(18:46) Social Media resistant
(22:03) Things that could be hurting their aware and branding
(26:35) Story’s and link trees
(39:21) Paid Advertising
(48:56) What can you do as a gym owner now 
(1:01:00) Self – made Summit

If you need help with this! Stu’s letting Best Hour Of Their Day listeners get buy one course, get one 50% off by using the promo code “fuckfacefifty”.  Like everything it takes time, and these will help with fundamentals to get you there. –

WTFgymtalk.com

Books:

Building a Story Brand: Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen – Donald Miller

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Fern:
All right, guys, welcome back to the Best Hour of the Day. Fern here with Stu Brower, second time on the show. I know your busy guy. So thank you for your time, brother.

Stu Brauer:
Oh, man, I appreciate you guys having me on your second time and it’s good to get ahead. Jason the first time, so it’s good to riff with you and mix it up. So I appreciate it.

Fern:
So I’ve been to your gym several times, so I like what, working seminars and stuff like that? Actually, both gyms. I’ve been to the old gym and then I’ve been to Urban. So I’ve seen that evolution unfold. And we can talk a little bit about that, too. But the reason I actually wanted to get you on this call is because I was. You know, surfing through social media other day and you had posted, I’m pretty sure it was a screen shot that was basically a dashboard and had. I’m pretty sure it was CBl Metrix on there that you got on there. And what caught me, what caught my eye was I think they were two cents. Right now, remember the time frame or whatever, but that’s what caught my eye. I was just like I looked at it because, like, I know enough to look at and be like, fuck. That’s really good. Like, that’s as good as it can massively be. And really what I want to kind of jam with you today about is so there’s a lot of people out there who are selling paid marketing, you know, Gym launch, Gym lead convertor, all these other things. And I don’t know. I don’t necessarily think people need to go right to that if they want to go to that. And however anybody feels about that, that’s fine. But I do think regardless, a gym owner, an entrepreneur needs to develop these skills like you can’t just fucking outsource this. That’s not that’s a terrible idea. With virtually any skill.

Stu Brauer:
Sure. So good. I agree. Do you do you shoot guns? Are you a gun owner?

Fern:
I am a gun owner.

Stu Brauer:
Ok. I’m not. But I’m gonna use this analogy. I thought you were. That’s the equivalent of this gym lunch thing is everyone’s like, I want to fuck a target up with a machine gun. But I don’t even know where the safety’s at. I wouldn’t even know how to load a clip if I wanted to. And that’s what I look at. That is you have guys and I have nothing but respect from a business standpoint for guys like Alex Mosi and all the little mini Alex or Mozes that have popped up since Gym launch became the behemoth that it is. And there was one just once eleventy, a hundred members and a forty five day window. And they wouldn’t they wouldn’t know, number one, what to do with them if they came in like a dog chasing a car. But number two, they don’t even know what to say. And so they’re gonna wait for you to give them the magic copy in the magical image that links to a magical landing page that is going to flood their checking account with Benjamins. And this this this idea that everybody has and it’s part of me, like the intelligent people look identical. There’s no such thing as membership on demand. There’s not a magical button that some Facebook guru guy that fucking took a click funnels course is gonna be able to push for you because that was the case. All just push that button and we’d all just be fucking and have having Maseratis.

Stu Brauer:
It’s it’s not the case. So.

Fern:
I think one of the big things I think one of the big things with regard to that is like so I know people that have had great success with it. So I’m not even going to be one of these people like this is bullshit. It doesn’t work like it. It works. Don’t get me wrong. Like, you can bring in a lot of revenue. What I’m not completely sold in is I’m not completely sold on. What’s the long tail on that? Like what does that look like? The already six months because Gym launch. So this is something to consider. Jim, it’s only been around for like two years. I think they’ve already switched their tactic. Right. So they don’t even sell the six week challenge anymore. So that just begs the question, why is it played out? Does it not work? Is it killing brands? I don’t know. But it is a question to ask when you’re looking at that. Right. And if you’re doing the six week challenges, which is a bait and switch and like I’m not even saying that’s a bad tactic, like it can work if used intelligently.

Stu Brauer:
Yes it can.

Fern:
Well, what does that do to the Internet’s successes? Yeah, exactly. Yeah. What would that do to your brand long term? So for those people who are I made, I’m not ready to pay a billion dollars for this. How do they start dipping their toes into the water?

Stu Brauer:
You know, it’s so funny. I made a post the other day that said using one of these six, we challenge companies. It’s like banging a slutty 10 and then realizing two months later you have syphilis. Like it seems really awesome at the time. But then it’s got long term R Y repercussions depending on what you want. And I think what we all just want we want to pay our bills. We want to pay ourself. That’s ultimately what it is. My belief is from that I believe enough of us there’s marketing and then there’s a branding. Marketing is what everyone’s selling. I’m trying to be one of the guys in the space talking about branding because the reason you might buy a certain brand of a rifle or a certain type of clothing or a certain car, it’s rarely because we saw a landing page. It’s rarely because we read some copywriting that whatever. It’s because of a thousand different transactions. And so this is what I call my marketing thesis is based off of WTF Gym talk, not my gyms. And here’s why.

I’ve never been able to do what Chris Cooper and Jim Wright and Matt Labs has been able to do, which is run ads. What the fuck, Gym Talk? cannot run ads because I swear on all my videos, it just I can’t do it even when I make content. When we tried to run ads back in 2016, the WTF, they would just get flagged. They just wouldn’t work. I was like, fuck it, I’m going to run ads. Everything I’ve grown with this business has been organic, but it’s been a consistent brand presence. You either hate me or you like my stuff, but whatever it is, you’re just you’re hardcore and one camp pretty other. Whereas I think with Gym owners right now we’re trying to do marketing where we talk to everybody. We’d like to be kind of liked by everybody.

Stu Brauer:
I would rather be viscerally hated as a business by one group and adored raving fans by another. And I believe that could all start organically. You mentioned the screenshot. I put up those the C.P.R. as a cost per results of a Facebook campaign. We’re running for urban movement right now and I start everybody off on organic. And now you and me both know that organic reach on Facebook was was taken away pretty significantly back in 2014. Here’s what here’s that’s a headline and it’s a accurate one. But what I like about organic, it forces gym owners to get a posting schedule up like I get my guys, the two and a half to three times a day posting and that is on both Insta and Facebook. Now, why I have them do that to that obnoxious level is because it forces them to practice copywriting. I use a Donald Miller approach if anybody has a read story brand by Donald Miller. I use an approach where we identify a micro problem. We go ahead and we write out our plan to fix that problem and we vividly describe a successful ending to that problem. And that becomes the copywriting and. I’ve got flag for stuff like this, you know, recently and some of the in the Crossfit, community cause some of the copyrighting I do with urban movement might seem like I’m going after Crossfit, gym sometimes or you know, I do it with orange theories will write copy. It says, are you bored of running on a treadmill at orange theory going nowhere? Well, at urban movement, we do this. And if you come here, it could be like this. Click the link below to blah blah blah. Like that is copyrighting that we have chosen to utilize and we do that with every model. Barry’s Crossfit, everything.

Stu Brauer:
I believe organically we start there in every gym owner here. Well, what do I do? You get a photographer to come in once a month. Baader paid. I don’t care what you do with it. One hundred and fifty photos, guys. Get one hundred and fifty of your members. That means out of one hundred and fifty goal posts. Seventy five Instagram. Seventy five the Facebook. That’s two and a half to three times a day. For those of you guys keeping up with the math, you’ll start practicing copywriting. You’re gonna start practicing testimonials. Right. You’ll know how to get a testimonial from a client. That’s a given. How about a reverse testimonial. That’s always the excuse. Like, well, I just don’t have anymore. We’ll do a reverse talk about Sally quick fuck and ask him for everyone to tell how awesome you are. Why don’t you talk about Sally? How fucking sweet she is. And then tag her. And not only the photo, but also the copy. And the Facebook algo will expose that organically to more of her ecosystem on Facebook than it would otherwise. And these are just organic things I start people with. Because if you can’t do that, what are we going to put money behind? What? Copyrighting? What? What? Why even spend money if you can’t even do organic decently? Here’s one thing, guys. Those of you listening, I bet some of you guys post maybe one time a day, if that. So if I really get you to do one hundred and fifty posts within 30 days and both of those platforms, there’s nobody who did one hundred and fifty posts up from 20 posts a month and didn’t make more money. So a lot of money.

Fern:
It’s really funny you bring this up right. Because we we made a pretty stark shift on social media, probably about two and a half, maybe three years ago at this point. And I just put some really simple parameters on it. And I got a lot of pushback from the staff and people that were involved in that. And they’re like, hey, it’s just gonna be too much like peop- people that people are not going to see it. And my. And at first I used to get mad because my response was like, you don’t know what you’re talking about. Right. Like, that’s not how it works. But the reality is that is a correct answer. Like.

Fern:
It’s almost impossible to post too much because of how the algorithm works and to go back.

Stu Brauer:
Only 15 percent will see it.

Fern:
Yeah. And to go past that, if you just go from doing nothing to running paid ads, which is what a lot of people are doing, if you think that people are not sifting back through your feed to find content, to find relative interest, information, to find educational stuff. You’re wrong. Right. So think about your own actions. If I see a brand that pops up, the first thing I do before I even click like go into their link to buy some shit is I go into their feed and I’ll just scroll through their feed and just see what they have in there. What are they doing? What kind of content they have in their like are they educating or are they just asking. So anything that goes out on our social media handles for Crossfit,, right? Is it has to be giving. Right. So there’s a 0 3 giving and taking. Right. That’s stupid.

Fern:
Random panning video of the 5 p.m. classic, 5 p.m. crushing it. That’s taking because it has no context around. Tell me anything about your gym. It tells me nothing about any of those individuals in the gym or their story. You just stole fifteen seconds of my time and not super pissed about it.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah, I don’t. Look, it needs to be entertaining and or educational. And I and I and I hope gym owners listen is when we say educational, don’t go that this is how you do a bent over row route. I think that could still work. It’s still very a played out thing to do. Educational, in my opinion, is and I went on Khalipa, podcasts and I was really happy to be able to give him these no’s. I think podcasting like what you do, what I do with my podcast. I don’t understand why every micro-chipped doesn’t have an internal podcast. I really don’t understand. It has opened so many BTB doors for myself and the gyms that do this. It has opened up internal sales and just community getting to interview your clients. Normally your clients have never been on a podcast before, and when you ask them to be on it, that is value. So like, you know, you’re like, man, I’m running out of post. I don’t know what to do, blah, blah. You could also do. You can go audio if you want. You don’t need a lot of equipment. You need a phone, and anchor, you know, to go to your thing. Before you know, the educational and entertaining you talked about, not, you know, the people to understand the numbers.

Stu Brauer:
If you’ve a thousand followers, guys, a thousand followers on Facebook or a thousand people like your page and you post one thing. Let’s say 15, 15 percent of them via an algorithm are going to see that. That’s like one hundred and fifty people. That’s one hundred and fifty or so what the fuck, Gym, talk? I think there’s maybe maybe barely eight thousand people who like that Facebook business page.

Stu Brauer:
I have the post between six and nine times a day just to hit 20 percent of the total followers to see anything to even get to that number.

Stu Brauer:
You don’t know how people are seeing repeats and whatever it is, but that’s the truth. You cannot post too much these days. You can’t as long as it’s educational and entertaining.

Fern:
Yeah. So that’s the key, right? Is like you can you can post too much if the content is done poorly. Meaning like it has no value to anybody. Just like other out of the jam or something like that. And I think that’s where people get stuck because they’re not sure what to do. Right. So I like to think of it as far as content is like, hey, we have three to five buckets of content. Right. So there’s coaching content. There’s entertaining content. There is a member content, there’s informational just like stuff that’s going on in the gym. Right. So that’s four already. I guarantee you that you have all the information on one of those four things or all of those four things currently in your gym. Start posting about those. Right. Instead of just asking everybody to buy your product all the time. Right. It’s just that’s that’s the rub, right? It’s like a gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme. And we’re not thinking about is on the consumer. And what are you getting about?

Stu Brauer:
Yes, I think so. We have a thing in Charlotte, it’s called the Charlotte Agenda. It’s an online publication and it literally is all the cool places to eat, drink, socialize, new gyms, new stores, advancements in the city.

Stu Brauer:
And here’s the thing about it. It’s really shitty journalism, but everybody watches it because they want to know what new bar, restaurant or whatever is opening up that week. So we saw that and we’re like, well, we trademark that sweat local and hashtags. What locals we created the Sweat local CLEC podcast. We essentially birddog them wherever they go and do that week. We go like tomorrow. Me and my staff, my g_m_m_, my assistant, GM. We’re gonna go to a brand new barbecue restaurant. We’ve already called up. We said that we own this gym and we have a podcast. We are going to come eat here and we’d love the schedule. An interview with the owner. That interview’s already scheduled up for two weeks from now. It’s not going to have him on the podcast. And that’s just it now. It doesn’t have to be a podcast. Let’s just say you just went in there with your staff and you guys got some decent photos of the place in the red in the meal. Not only is it trendy, it’s a new place to just open. Now you can tag them in it and maybe they’ll share it. And now you can talk about, hey, those you guys who are at the malls and trying to put on some weight. This is what we’d recommend you eat. Those of you guys that are more and no more fish, we’d recommend you stick to this and you could educate and entertain.

Fern:
So I wanna go back to something you said earlier because you said you’re looking at one hundred and fifty pieces of content or seventy five Facebook and seventy five Instagram.

Fern:
I want you to talk about to people , because a ton of people are still doing this. Who are cross posting from one platform to the other

Stu Brauer:
Oh God. And so we know you guys do this because we see your Facebook post and it has a ton of hashtags after that because you did it. You did this from Instagram to Facebook. So stop doing that. What I would recommend the most cost effective app I found and you guys will be able to utilize it for free is later DOT app.

Stu Brauer:
It’s a it’s a way to serve. Yeah. That’s it’s phenomenal. It’s less convoluted than HootSuite, in my opinion, and far more affordable. And once you realize these third party apps are subject to the API allowances of these platforms of Instagram and Facebook. So if Facebook changes their API and their allowances of what people can do with it from a third party perspective, these things could be this could change from the time this podcast drops. But as of right now, no third party app will ins- will automatically post videos or collages for you. You have to manually push that through the later app on your phone. But for photos, which is what I want you guys to hit the low hanging fruit and that’s what photos are there, the low hanging fruit on content. Obviously, we get in the video gets way more productive and things and audio with the podcast gets more advanced. But you can audio posts like little sit down on a Sunday, go into later, schedule your post. I just had to call it the new gym owner I’m working with right now. WI my social media mandatories, my assistant GM. He has an excel sheet with 50 pieces of copy.

Stu Brauer:
Why is it that gym owners think social media posting and workouts need to always be brand new? Like I came out with this new workout. Why don’t you guys run reruns? If I were to say to any of you fuckers, fifteen minutes could save you fifteen and I stopped. You would finish the sentence 15 percent or more on car insurance. Why? Because you’ve heard that tagline a gazillion times. So when we come up with a good piece of copy and we tested organically, we can talk about that, how you can go into your insights on your Facebook business page and know what good what what’s working and what’s not. We test organically and then we keep it. We put it in that Excel sheet and my social media manager who does one hundred and fifty plus posts per month. I think it takes a maybe thirty five to forty minutes on a Sunday.

Fern:
Yeah. If so that’s the rub right. It doesn’t take nearly as long as people think it does.

Stu Brauer:
It’s like when you tell your clients shopping and eating healthy is actually could be less expensive. Yeah, they don’t believe you and you at first up. Yeah.

Fern:
And it’s the same thing, the same thing you said about like basically doing reruns is I always like. And again, I don’t want people to think we’re smashing him in the face. But again, what I what we’re trying to expose is people don’t know what they don’t know. And I want you to not be able to unknow these things. Right. So like we’re telling you right now. Good content is basically always good content, which means if it was good today, it will probably still be good in six months. And here’s the deal, everybody. No one forgot that you ran it six months ago and be already talked about. Eighty five percent of the people didn’t see it the first time. It’s like me going to a seminar and teaching their squat and the breakout.

Fern:
Be like, you know what? I can’t use the Knee out cue because I use it in the last seminar. Yeah. It’s like, no, no. It still works. Right. And it’s still engaging. So just figure out how to repurpose it. Maybe you change the copy. Maybe you post a little bit differently. Maybe you take that video and you posted in stories and see if it Seether index is a little bit differently. You can use it so many different ways.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah, and it’s really interesting, too, when you reverse. So earlier we talked about not cross-posting and what we mean by that is instantly don’t post by cross-posting with the Instagram feature, which you can do that. However, the photos you go on Facebook can be utilized on Instagram as well. I want you to think of the two platforms. Facebook is what I call copy first, creative second. Right? You see the long form copy or short form, whatever you’re rolling with. And then you see the piece of creative and the creative is the video or photo being utilized, Instagram and YouTube or the opposite. They are creative first and then you have to go below to see the copy.

Stu Brauer:
So you can like there’s not like we’ll see you as this photo only for Facebook. No. You can use it on either way. But just realize once you probably take it to Facebook, you better and stronger copy maybe than when you’re on Instagram.

Stu Brauer:
Right. Or it’s gonna maybe sound to be a little bit differently. You can’t like there’s no links in Instagram. You can’t click a link and Instagram. Like I’ve got some gyms right now in my area that I just want to just shake them because I look at their social media, comes through my feed and they’ve got links in their Instagram copy and like, I can’t click that asshole. Why is that going in there? Do you not realize that? Right. And until you have 10000 followers, you can’t swipe up on a story to get to where you want to go unless it’s paid. Right. You got it. You got to it just there. There’s certain nuances, the platforms, I think a lot of people don’t understand.

Fern:
So that kind of is a perfect segue way into the next piece, which is certain people are resistant to getting into social media, social media at all for probably one of two major reasons. Either one, they feel like they don’t need it because their gem is probably doing OK or two. It’s just overwhelming. And they don’t want to take the times or because like, make no mistake, guys, you’re going to spend hundreds of hours on social media platforms on the back end, learning how to run Facebook ads, looking at your business, the business end of your of your Facebook going and looking at insights and Instagram, checking all of those engagements, all that stuff like you’re going to feel like you’re wasting time. But that’s not the case. Right. So for those people who are resistant to do this, how are you trying to start to get them to kind of like just wade their way out at least into the shallow end here?

Stu Brauer:
Yeah. So first is what is the need if you if again, if you’re not making enough money, I’m going to tell you this right now, I look at social media solely as a way to generate awareness and then revenue later is the buying cycle. So the buying cycle is three stages and this is a school of thought across all kinds of kinds that this isn’t something I came up with. You become aware of a brand. You then consider a brand and then you purchase from a brand if you make it all the way through the buying cycle. If you have accepted that not enough people are purchasing from you the last stage of the buying cycle. Then I take you back to the previous step. How many people are considering you? How many people are walking in the door? Which is the first sale we almost make, guys. They have to walk in the door first. No one’s buying these memberships online. It’s not Amazon. And you’re like, well, OK, maybe we could get in a lot of people in the door. We’re not closed now. Well, now that’s a different conversation. My guess is we go back to the previous one awareness. How many out of the hundred thousand people in your city actually know you exist? If I walked around with my camera and I vlog this for what the fuck, Gym talk and a Mike and I walk up the people on the street and said, hey, have you heard of urban movement? And you like.

Stu Brauer:
Is that like Urban Outfitters or is that a microbrewery or what is that like? That is the problem. Awareness is the one element of the buying cycle. You know, you have to accept and if I can get a gym owner to agree with me there, then I then, you know, it’s 20, 20. And, you know, we all know where the awareness is. Now, most of time that people don’t want to get on social, they’re old, they’re set in their ways and maybe they’re young and just really weird and set in their ways.

Stu Brauer:
Like what? To like a twenty three year old who hates social media. Like, how the fuck do you get through life? Well, whatever. It’s fair enough to each their own. But is a business thing. Don’t be romantic about your own sentiments on this.

Stu Brauer:
You’ve got to either do it yourself or outsource it to someone because there is no staying alive. If you cannot track awareness or people and awareness is whether you like it or not on social media, it just is so.

Fern:
So with regard to awareness. I want to talk about some things that I see people do very poorly. And I don’t think it’s because they’re like trying to do it. They think it’s just because they literally don’t know what to do. Right. So if you were a gym owner, stop posting videos of you working out in your gym. That’s the first thing, right? That gives nobody any value, right? Like that’s not bring awareness to your brand and what what it is that you do and what you found. And the second thing is stop posting panting videos of just random stuff. Right. So what are some of the other things that you see people do incorrectly that are actually hurting awareness and branding?

Stu Brauer:
The utilizes the iPhone is an amazing piece of technology and the camera on it is good enough, is good enough when someone is utilizing it correctly. Use that gun analogy. You know, fern could probably kill fucking one hundred people in seven seconds with his gun. I would it would break my collarbone and I wouldn’t know what I was doing with it. Ok, so your iPhone. Yes. Can shoot amazing photos. But if you haven’t been practicing and I really do mean practice like you actually mess around with this and you practice taking shots with certain people. So here’s one. You’re super tactical.

Stu Brauer:
You guys have bay doors. Stop taking photos where you are shooting into the light, coming in from a bay door. That is bad contrast on the photo. Put your back to the bay door. So the bay door acts as a backlight for you. That is just a very simple tactical thing that I see done wrong all the time. There are certain movements, guys that don’t do well in photo double unders and wall balls are one of them. There’s too much movement. Whenever my photographer comes in. Everything we do at urban movement is tempo based everyth- like we have time under tension almost throughout the entire workout. It’s one of the things we changed up when we started making changes. I’m going to tell you right now, you want to build in tempo on the days that you take photos because people will pause tempo when the bottom of the squat tempo with the barbell overhead tempo with their chin over the bar slow. You’re fucking crazy energizer bunny fuck in our X plus members down. That way the photographer can capture a moment, not a movement too often. We’re all trying to capture this amazing lift or a PR or a movement. Capture someone smiling, capture someone concentrating really hard on the assault like captures two people fist pumping those. These are all things I see us all capturing the wrong kind of thing. And then when we do, it’s got a low quality because it’s you know, as the wall ball’s coming back down, it’s super blurry, big foot style. There’s just some little things like that.

Stu Brauer:
And I’m not an artist. I’m not a photographer. I’m not even a videographer. Right. I know those are those are art forms that I am I am amateur novice at best. And I but I know enough to respect that. I want that art to come out. Well, here’s a question. Would my client, who I took a photo of, would they potentially make that their profile picture? If the answer is no, don’t post it, because the goal of posting and tagging these people in here is what it’s an organic marketing campaign called the tagging campaign is to get them to share it. But you ever see anybody working out? We look like assholes. Yet that damn Bailie look your fucking tongues hanging out, your drooling all over yourself. It’s not attractive people. It’s not. You know, if you want host a photo shoot. We have our members every quarter come in and we do a photo shoot. Not all, but we we select we pick we pick just enough black people, just enough women, just enough guys, because it’s a marketing photo shoot and we do one. But I’m able to pause. I’m able to make them do what I want. I direct the entire thing and I’m able to get exactly what I want out of them. So those you guys, you got an iPhone, you’ve got probably the best cameras on the planet in your pocket, but it doesn’t mean it’s gonna fix your shitty photo. Look, just there’s some tact that needs to go into it.

Fern:
Yeah. I mean, most of us shoot 4K. And if you’re struggling to do this, I am not aware of a gym that doesn’t have somebody that is either a professional photographer or who does photography on the side, have them buy them coffee, have them spend 30 minutes with you and you’re going to learn stupid little things about like don’t angle the camera up because nobody wants that video and your ceiling probably looks like shit and stop taking pictures based on that corner. That’s super dirty in the gym. And speaking of the back. What is in the back of the photo? Like, why is that stupid poster of innervate back there and not your logo of your gym?

Stu Brauer:
100 percent, close ups are always going to kill, like I told people, folk, all art should have one focal point. When you look at the Mona Lisa, it has. There’s one focal point on there. It’s her eyes, right. Like it’s every piece of art should have one focal point. And when I see gym owners take photos of a group and there’s seven people doing seven different things. There is no centralized focal point and the art will be lost on the viewer. So I recommend what we call punching in on one person at a time. And then also when you’re copywriting guys allows you to tell an easier story. It’s much easier to tell a story of Kristin Smith pressing the barbell overhead and how you can talk about it, how on day one she barely could do this with an empty barbell and how proud of her and how much hard she’s worked. Whatever it may be, vs. a shot of six people. And like one person’s like, look, in this way, one person’s eyes are close. Punch in on your shots.

Fern:
The other thing I was going to ask you about was how do you what’s your guidance for people on? Because obviously stories aren’t there forever, but you can use them. So things like. So I think a lot of people don’t understand how to utilize stories or they don’t understand like why they should have something like Langtry attached to the back end of Instagram.

Stu Brauer:
So we so my CRM and Web site, Fleck’s has a built in link tree. So. But for anyone who doesn’t know what we’re told about Link, Tree is a very inexpensive app that allows you because the goal of Instagram is to get them to your gallery, because on your gallery as a link, it’s the only place to take them off the platform. So you want to go ahead, get them to click that. But there’s only room for one link. What a link tree is, is it creates one link. They click it. It opens up two options of different links. That way they can go to your free trial week promo. They can go to your Web site. They can do whatever. So that’s where referring to on that. My biggest thing on Unnice Right is stories and things of that nature. Stories are meant to be conversations in a hallway. So think back to like passing a coworker, you know, in the hallway. There’s meant to be just one little quick things. You’re not meant to be things that are super. Remember a bowl that you really want to live. And if you can, you could create the the story highlights on your Instagram feed. We utilize them to number one, we do the sneak peak every night. We literally show we give out the workout at week in advance, but we show the movements of the next day’s workouts and we have three different speeds and our lift and move class. We talk about that. That’s why we utilize this story for we share our members stories. So whenever a member post about us Riri, share that on our story and give a little context to it. And if the staff is doing something kind of fun that day, like we’re planning for moving day, which is kind of I guess you compare it maybe to our version of the open or an event or something, we will show those quick little highlights there. Nothing that we need to take up your entire day. We don’t need to make it a big deal. It just this is what we’re doing. And I like doing it periodically throughout the day so that we’re always at the top. Whenever you open up your phone, that urban movement is circles up there. One of the top three or four or five on their stories is not like long version, like talking head videos. If you’re going to do a talking head video of you talking to your members and it’s fucking fifteen, ten second clips. Too much, man. Nobody’s listening.

Fern:
You put that on IGTV. Just make a full blown five.

Stu Brauer:
Exactly. Exactly. Exactly. So it’s also understanding that.

Fern:
Yes, I just got to go back to IGTV. That is where if somebody wants to make educational stuff, download the IGTV app through those educational videos there. Don’t put them in stories. You can put some other like short-form, like doctor, like movement videos, like we have those on Facebook and Instagram. But if I do like a five. Like if you go back and look at Crossfit, Ryse Instagram, like you go to HGTV, like the last three posts on HGTV or like 5+ minutes talking about like tips and tricks on the rower, the skier or the runner, the bike. Right. Like that people are gonna click and that and they’re gonna watch a five minute video in there. They’re not going to watch that ten second clip. Fifty eight times.

Stu Brauer:
Correct. And here’s the thing, too, is so Instagram stories of it has a 10 second capacity, your gallery, your Instagram gallery has a one minute capacity and then your i.g.’s TV for our accounts. Have a 10 minute if you are. But if you’re a verified account, you can go up to an hour. So we’re all none of us are verified. So let’s just go out and say we have a ten minute limit when you go and create an i.g.’s story, maybe three, four, five minutes long. It will still show up in preview and your gallery. So people be watching it. And then once it hits the 1 minute mark, it cuts over. I will say this is where the nuances get kind of kind of crazy because the cropping for your gallery versus HGTV are different. So for those of you guys who aren’t really big into the editing, I don’t. We can geek out on that if you want. You get into aspect ratios and dimensions. And here’s just, you know, the real quick, easy, dirty way of it. You want to go? You want to go 19, 20 by 10, 10, 18, 19, 20 by 10, 80 for i.g.’s stories you want to crop in for your gallery. And this again, this gets very much in the weeds of editing. You guys Google at YouTube, it there’ll be some some guy way smarter than me. They’ll tell you how to do it efficiently. But debts, that is, I think also another thing. What do you think for that where people just like I don’t know what the fuck I’m doing with editing. I’m just not like. You think you think the nuances of it people get shy away from.

Fern:
Well, I think I think. I don’t think I know because it was me. I think people are scared of people looking at whatever content they produce on day one, they decide to make this start happening that people are gonna judge them for it. And what I’m here to tell you is, like we all have the attention span of squirrels, basically. So nobody remembers what you posted yesterday. That’s the first thing. So don’t worry about it. But B, just be OK with like it’s that it’s no different than the first day you started. You decided we wanted to coach the first day you decided you want to be a business owner. The first time you walked in Crossfit gym, you’re not going to be good at it. There is no other way to get good at this than to practice it, right. So if you go back and look at our content two years ago, it probably sucks balls. If I look at your content from three years ago, it doesn’t look anything like it looks like today. Right. So in order to get to content, it looks good. You have to understand that that’s going to take a thousand posts. It’s going to take, I don’t know, two hundred podcasts. It’s going to take 150 episodes of a YouTube channel before you start to feel comfortable in front of a camera. You’re like, oh, this doesn’t suck anymore. It’s Quas. Good.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah, and it’s my one of my marketing coaches tells me all the time is that you got to know it in in marketing when you need to see plus and when you need an A-plus and your Daily Post to Instagram and Facebook, you can get away with C plus guys, because like, you know, like Fern said, they’re not going to remember it. It’s just one blip. The one thing I would tell you, though, it needs to be a consistent brand voice. That’s one thing I’m huge on. You know, you want things to be consistent. And I’m not talking necessarily about your Instagram gallery looking super curated and very artsy. And like every image is perfectly aligned. And you know that that’s great of you. The other patients know how to do that. But I am just I’m not using common language. You know, it’s funny with what the fuck, Jym? Talk. You know? You know, I commonly referred to my audience as a fuckface. And I use the word Sally and I use I use a lexicon that people are able to start associating with my brand. I’ve been in business with urban movement now for less than three years. And when I did, I very prematurely trademarked, sweat local. And just now, just now. Are we getting people in our gym to utilize that trade, that that hashtag and utilize the branding of Sweat local? And now when we put that on our shirts, that’s one of the more requested pieces of retail we sell. But I’ve been trying to use that for two years and nobody gave a shit, my members. It took consistency for us to literally in every newsletter.

Stu Brauer:
We literally thank people for sweaty local with us at the end of a workout. Your stupid that sounds when you say it at the door. Like I’m like, God, that sounds so fucking corny. But now my members utilize it to the point where we’re hopefully in six more years. It’s as synonymous with us as think different is with Apple.

Fern:
Yeah, and the other thing, I think the reason consistency is king here, right, is that I think people are underestimating the time line that probably most people who are considering doing Crossfit, or some sort of boot camp or something like that stay in the consideration stage. Like, I have people I have people that will come to our gym and literally tell me straight up, they’re like, I’ve been stalking you guys for six to eight months. Yes. And what I told Reuters and that wouldn’t have worked. Had I been super sporadic about posting. Right. So we have to ask those every single day without failure. We’ve been posting wide brief videos, the 1 minute video with you on Instagram every single day. I think we might have missed five days and almost 18 months like. But that is now a standard thing that goes on our Instagram. Right. And so my recommendation, people like start with something, you know, you can do consistently and then slowly add to it as you build the habit of what the way I pitched it to our staff and the way we look at it now is like posting on Instagram is like the 9:00 a.m. class. It happens every day, like it is non-negotiable, like it goes up. And if it doesn’t go up, then shit has gone wrong.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah, 100 percent, I think, too. You know, it’s also for the gym owner listening. That has been posting manually via Facebook and Instagram and there’s a shouldn’t need to post something today. Going back to what we talked about a few minutes ago. Find a time to schedule it like when you sit down at home. You get up on a Sunday. You have a nice cup of coffee. And it’s kind of chilling in your living room and really thinking about your business. You’ve had maybe about you’ve probably had a day off since then. You probably do much on Saturday. You one class. You’re in a much better headspace to write copy and to think creatively about your business. I. I get it. When a gym was like, dude, it’s forty five. I got a 5:00 p.m. class. I’m trying to think of something to post. So I just post something shitty up there. I get it. That’s not the right time to be creative. And not everybody is creative. And here’s what I here’s my thoughts about creativity.

Stu Brauer:
Some people are naturally creative and and that is something that you can’t instill in somebody. But if you practice it enough, like I suck at basketball. Right. But if I played every day, I’d get better, considerably better. I wouldn’t be awesome. I’d still get my ass kicked, but I’d be better. And I just think that’s just one of those things where don’t. Don’t be like. I’m just not creative. Well, no, you’re not. You’re not as good. You’re not maybe as creative as I am, but that’s OK. But you’re also not trying. You could be as creative as some of the more creative people. If you just practice it every day.

Fern:
Yeah. Creativity is a muscle. And that goes back to the consistency part is like I’m practicing. I’m learning why that’s a bad post and I’m learning like that. That watermark doesn’t work when I post this video because the white of the watermark on a white wall in the background doesn’t fucking show up. Why does it make like that that you only.

Stu Brauer:
Like Programming.

Fern:
Yeah, look, you only learn those things by messing them up and it’s OK because you have to remember this is like which already you have to remember. People forget, right? They forget what the what the specifics of that post are. They don’t forget that they see your content consistently. Right. Like that is what the pieces writes. It’s just like just improve it over time. And then what people are gonna notice is like, oh, these guys really give a shit about what they do. Like, I’ve seen the evolution of this brand because they’re consistent. It’s gotten better. I’ve seen, you know, when Stu gym went from Southside to urban movement, I’m like, oh, that’s looking fresh, dude. I like what’s going on there. Like if you watch that because consistency is happening, like people are paying attention.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah. Now I love man. It’s also be where your clients are you guys ever notice that, you know, the DUI lawyer is always on a park bench on the side of like the public transportation bus because that’s where their fucking clients are. Right. So for urban movement, I’m really big into guerilla marketing. And there’s a firm in Charlotte I hired to do some guerilla marketing with us. And they they do these things called, what’s it called, clean graffiti. If you if you heard of this.

Fern:
No.

Stu Brauer:
Clean. So that clean graffiti is where a company goes and makes giant stencils of your logo, your slogan, whatever you want. And they go all over the city with a power washer and they go to dirty sidewalks and they spray it into the sidewalk and it misses and it hits all the perfect loopholes because they’re not putting anything on the sidewalk. They’re taking dirt off the sidewalk. So we have a company in Charlotte that fuckin does clean the feed. And you go in there and put, you know, you know how to find your movement. Urban movement, whatever, in downtown Charlotte with arrows that go all the way to my gym.

Stu Brauer:
And I like it. The city loves it because it’s they’re getting their sidewalks clean for free. But they think it’s a creative way to get your brand message out. So, guys, if you were to go and start looking at some cool graffiti, here’s another really cool guerilla marketing Tibbett. There’s a new restaurant that open up in Charlotte right next to a beautiful park, and that Parks Landscaping is cornered with pebbles, not mulch, not dirt, just pebbles everywhere. So this company called Bricks, it’s a wood-fired pizza shop. They went ahead and bought a thousand pebbles like from a landscape store, had them all painted red with the bricks logo on it. And they went all through that park and just spread them all through the motherfucking park. Now, the city probably slapped them on the wrist, but the city is not going to go and pick up a thousand red pebbles out of there. And they had it. It’s water based paints would come off eventually. But on the back of each pebble, it was fifteen percent off your next pie. It was just a creative way. Like they. They know that that’s where their customers are. They go to this park with their kids. Why not put your shit there? There’s just other things like social media is that you got to be there, guys. But I’m a huge fan of being as as guerrilla as possible as well. I think that’s such an over an underestimated marketing tactic still.

Fern:
So on that note. Right. So let’s say we get people who are posting, you know, consistent good branding content that provides value to the people that are consuming or follow that platform.

Fern:
The other B fit, which I get right. I have a just extremely visceral reaction to losing money. Like it makes me want to punch babies and punch dogs. Right. So that’s the other thing that people. Have a hard time with.

Fern:
Because I mean, I don’t know how you feel about it, but like when you start to kind of venture out into the deep force that is paid advertising, like you’re going to lose money. Right. So like, where do you where do you start? Like, how do you get people to start? Like, what’s the what’s the tolerable place to start for most people? Yep.

Stu Brauer:
I once the organic tagging campaign happens for at least two months at a gym shows me they can do that. I move them into paid branding campaigns at a five dollar a day budget. When you guys create a campaign on Facebook, you have what are called objectives. These are where you pick. And if you notice going back to our conversation, they’re selected by the three faces the buying cycle awareness, consideration and purchase brand awareness and reach out to the least expensive marketing options.

Stu Brauer:
And that screenshot you reference to the beginning, this podcast where I had to go to in one sense, CPRS. That’s what I was doing. Their engagement video views are probably are next on the cheapest. You can get those for 1, 2, 3, 4 cents. Link clicks those get more expensive. And then when you get into conversion where you’re paying for a conversion on a landing page or you’re gonna use Facebooks built in lead gen for name, email and phone number, then you’re gonna get very expensive. I told people to go with the brand new one. We want an ever green ad. And when I say evergreen guys that just when we’re running something that just consistently works like wrote I use Rogue is my evergreen example. Rogue has an ever green t shirt. It’s the road t shirt just as Rogue on the fucking front. It’s in every color you can fucking imagine. We all probably own 10 of them, right? That’s evergreen. It’s always going to work for them. You should have your own evergreen retail, but you should also have your own evergreen. Ad that is just always running for five dollars a day and a brand campaign. So, you know, I could do a screenshare now. We’ve got one going right now that has seventy five that we can now. Seventy five thousand impressions at point to cents.

Fern:
And it’s just always running in the background because I mean you probably see these numbers too. There’s there’s no consensus on it but it takes the average person 12. Nineteen twenty three different touch points with senior message before they ever actually retain it on social media.

Stu Brauer:
So I start there five dollars a day on one of those branding campaigns where you have a link in there. So there is a clear call to action. You have to tell people what you want them to do. But a $5 day budget everyone to a stand. And now I need I tell them, listen, because you’re only spending five hours a day. Don’t be like, dude, it’s been two weeks. Everybody name e-mails or phone numbers yet. I get it, bro. I get it. You’re going to need ten thousand people to see the ad.. All right. That’s what we call reach or impressions. And then you’re gonna need a thousand people to click on the link and a thousand people. You’ll be happy if one percent give you their name, email and phone number. That I mean, it’s it’s just a numbers game, and when you get into marketing, you’re going to say, let’s go back to the gun analogy. You’re going to waste bullets when you go to the range. You’re going to waste a lot of ammo when you go to the range.

Fern:
Yeah, you’re not going at the bull’s eye every single time. And I think and I think this once we start getting in, once we start going down this rabbit hole, this is where people get a little bit turned off. Right. And this is where I’m trying to get people. I’m like, stay in the boat. Like, don’t jump out because Stu just gave you look to get the ten thousand people. That means only a thousand. We’re going to click the link. I’m looking for one percent because that one percent. Not all of them are going to buy. That means I need to have done consistent amount of work on the back end to provide them value. I need to follow up with them. I might have to hit them with three or four e-mails after that. So I think we’re maybe set people’s mind at ease is that this is a really fucking long game. Like, don’t don’t put that ad up and hope that you’re going to smash it in 30 days. Hope that you’re gonna get conversion on that and six to eight months of doing that consistently. It’s not going to be that at all will be the next one.

Stu Brauer:
So if anyone is listening, this was maybe, let’s say they’re a homeowner or they rent an apartment. When you were looking for your apartments and your homes and your neighborhoods and all that, that that’s a very serious purchase.

Stu Brauer:
A gym membership to some people is a very serious purchase, not even from a monetary standpoint, but just from like a commitment level standpoint. These things are not made overnight. I bought I saw I have an electric skateboard that right around. I probably research that for probably two and a half months before I bought it.

Stu Brauer:
It’s a fucking electric skateboard, isn’t fucking. It’s an expensive thing. But bottom line is you will research. You will see brands you like. You’ll follow them on Instagram.

Stu Brauer:
You’ll keep watching. You’ll Google. You’ll look for reviews. You’ll do all that. And that takes weeks and weeks and weeks. And that is where everyone listening.

Stu Brauer:
This is where why I think we’re saying this members on demand button. It doesn’t exist. It will work. Like we can push that button and you can make some people show up. They will not stick around long term. That’s that. That part has been proven. Some will. Most won’t. But it’s yet another thing. And you’re also I don’t look, it is wasted money. Every two cents that I get charged on a reach or a brand awareness campaign that doesn’t convert to a name, email or phone number and ultimately to a client. They still heard of me. I told you I told you what time the goal of your marketing, your branding is to walk into a grocery store and hear people talking about your business while you’re in line to check out and they don’t know you’re behind them. Have you seen that? Have you heard of that urban movement or see people wearing your apparel that you don’t know? That’s my biggest goal when I see people wearing urban movement apparel that I don’t know because I don’t know them as a member. I’m not very much involved in a lot of the day to days at the gym, but that’s what I’m like, OK, we’re doing something here because that’s what I need. I need people associate themselves with my thing. Maybe they just got a free shirt that we gave away at a breast cancer awareness thing. That’s cool. Fuck it. Wear it. I don’t care. I can’t be upset.

Stu Brauer:
I spent $9 on that t shirt and I didn’t get a member out of it because that is the game you signed up for. I know you guys all saw it. You signed up to own your own gym and workout, whatever you want. And for your own elite fitness. Guess what? You signed up for a business and this numbers game that we’re trying to make seem more tolerable. You know, something easier to digest. That’s the basic fact of it. You’re going to spend money that won’t return money for you. That’s just how it’s going to be.

Fern:
On that note, what do you have with regard to like do you have anything that you recommend or try to get people in with regard to like a marketing budget? Like, hey, I want you to try to get out spending 2 to 3 percent of monthly revenue on this.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah. Here’s a great one. I do a 30 day cancellation notice and I do that because of something we call when I was doing global gym consulting rate of replacement in a global gym, I would have a ten thousand dollar a month marketing budget, have seven sales guys. My rate of replacement on anybody who cancelled was three days. We knew we could replacement three days with that kind of an AMA. The rate of replacement for a micro gym who doesn’t fuck and understand social and probably it doesn’t have those means. I’m just gonna say you need thirty days to replace one.

Stu Brauer:
So let’s say five people canceled your gym and each of those five people were worth two hundred dollars a month to you. So that is now a thousand dollars in recurring of T. You’re gonna be losing. I have them what I call my numbers trackers excel sheet that I use, my gyms that I work with. We take their total cancel the F T for that month. Now we know we’ve a 30 day notice, so we’re gonna be getting one more month’s draft out of them. We’ll take generally around 30 percent of that money as a budget to acquire. So people who cancel finance new client acquisition with their last month’s dues.

Fern:
I’ve never heard of that, but I’m going to try it and see how it goes. So, again, I don’t I’m like, well, we can talk about retention in a minute, but if you want to. But like we we have reversed course on that. And I think we’re doing a really, really good job of it where like I’m not I’ve worked well under 3 percent churn at this point. But the. So if I have five people cancel, let’s say that’s you know, without. So I’m gonna take what, three hundred bucks. That’s not my marketing budget. Thirty three. Three thirty.

Stu Brauer:
Would take or I’d take me. Yeah. Thirty to forty percent of it. And it’s also depending on if you know I look at net zero at the end of the month is the best, worst case scenario is a net zero. Three people join, three people cancel. The average micro gym really should only be growing by maybe two, three, four members if that per month. Honestly, like you know, everyone like that’s when Gym launch of the scene and you heard like 30 members in a month like this, everyone not understand what that’s going to do to the infrastructure of a business. Most of these gyms that we’re talking about don’t have full time staff to drop 20 new members into a business like ours like that. I know it seems like it’s the solution to your problem. It’s not. But I would tell you. No. I try to. You know, for some gyms, let’s say I’m trying to get them the net three members a month. Thirty six new members year over year, which is really good growth.

Fern:
Yeah.

Stu Brauer:
I would say probably about 30 percent of that, probably 30 to 40 depending. And it also depends on what kind of ads we’re running. We’re running those brand ads like the ones that point two cents per C.P.R., three, four cents. That money is gonna go a very long way if we’re going in a generation.

Fern:
If you’re getting like one to two dollars. Yeah. I mean, that’s like really good.

Stu Brauer:
So once those ads for us hit five cents, we kill it. We turn it off once a pain where. Because we. Yeah. We really dial it down that per impression or per through play. And those guys through plays a 15 second watch on a video. We I know I know what we can get. So if we’re not getting it it means I messed something up on the copy or the images and converting as well, whatever it may be. And we go and try it again because I know what I’m capable of getting so I will not overpay. So.

Stu Brauer:
So somebody who’s listening to this, you know, that they’ve listened to this whole conversation. We’ve talked about like obviously this is a lot of work. And I’m not going to be this person who’s going to sit here and tell you that it’s not like anybody who says that this is not a lot of work and you can automate this. You never touch it again. It’s full of shit. So don’t buy that. You know, the gym owner was listening. This is saying, listen, I already don’t get a day off. How the fuck am I supposed to add another 10 hours of work a week? How do they start working their way towards either a removing themselves from some sort of gym aspect that they can do this or maybe bringing somebody on to start taking that role?

Stu Brauer:
I think, again, that we talked about earlier. I think honestly, I would audit that gym owners day to day, the twenty four units and I would find forty five minutes on a Sunday for them to start scheduling organic posts.

Stu Brauer:
I would just start there. I honestly would. And then once they saw then. OK, this makes sense. I get now why you’re having me do this. Now it’s a. Can you give me thirty five dollars a week, five bucks a day for a branding campaign? And I’d start there with them and I’d slowly work at it. But those here’s the thing is. And especially because the Open’s coming up and I’m really going to hit the Crossfit, gym owners real hard in this, guys. If you are bitching about not having enough time for this and you’re gonna refire your open sixty and nineteen point six, remember the fuck it’s called and do it twice. You go fix yourself. I don’t care. I don’t want to hear you complaining. You are a business owner first. You are not an athlete first. Bottom line. So, no, you do if you want to do the open twice. Great. Make sure you get your marketing done, too. But if you’re going complete it enough time, then you need to stop watching that.

Stu Brauer:
You know, outlaw’s ways, fuckin’ strategy video unfuck in, you know, nineteen point seven and fuck and just focus on growing the business because you won’t have a gym to work out a much longer.

Fern:
Yeah, I think I think the big takeaway here is that while this can be overwhelming, once you even get not even a good grasp of it, a moderate grasp of it, it does not take that much time. It does not take that much time. If you schedule it, I have had different like I have somebody else do it now.

Fern:
But the lot I’ve had people do it who’ve done almost a month’s worth of posts scheduled out, separate content to different platforms on like in one day. So 30 days worth of content. Just sit down for three to four hours on a Sunday, schedule it out and that and that could just be the basis of of our of our content that’s gonna go out and then we’ll we’ll put things in there as we get them throughout the month. But that’s already, you know, 50 to 60 posts each platform that we don’t have to worry about anymore because those don’t need to go to specific time. It’s just good content. And then as stuff comes up, I’m like, get that out. Look it up.

Stu Brauer:
And then once you have a good luck with that tagging campaign and all that, once you have a good 40, 50, 60, 70 post, you just repost them like might reduce my saji. Like in the beginning I was like, I know you’re and I spend a lot of time on this now, but just wait.

Stu Brauer:
Give it eight months. He Liley click, click, click, click, rescheduled them all and later allows you to do that because later you can write the copy right in the photos they give you a free cloud. You get to keep all your photos right there. I mean, literally, I bet you I for what we’re paid. I bet you it’s taken him far, far, far less time than them. Really. What it’s what we pay them for. But that’s great. He’s he’s creative. Put the time and effort into make sustainable, repeatable content. Saving what program? We do the same thing. We repeat our workouts all the time. We don’t write new workouts rarely because that’s a lot of time I paid for our model. We just want to go out. We need we have other things we need to focus on. Can’t be right. A brand new workout every day.

Fern:
I just think this is a skill that you have to start developing because I’m not aware of a business that doesn’t have this like this as a strong arm of their business. Like, I don’t I just don’t know. You can consider yourself a business is gonna be around in 10 years that doesn’t have this wired pretty tight over the next thirty six months.

Stu Brauer:
Better have an amazing. You better have an amazing what we call torque trigger. There is a diner called Skip’s Diner out in California. And so if I see burger joints, burgers and fries, what’s the company you think of in California?

Fern:
Oh, in and out

Stu Brauer:
In and out, Right. That’s what everyone thinks of. Skip’s Diner has never spent a single dollar on marketing. What they do is when you walk in the door and the line is always out the door, you get to the front counter, you place your order first, and then the person behind the counter gets open. A brand new deck of cards. They fan out the entire 52 card deck, shuffle it up like a professional casino gambler. And if you pick the Joker, the entire order is fucking free no matter what you ordered. There are people that go insane for this. Like the Instagram videos, when someone wins, they’re calling their mom and Tom, they’ve created what I call a talk. What Jay Baer calls a talk trigger is operational choice to do something remarkably different. That does surprise and delight that does the marketing for them. If you’ve ever seen that a Hilton Hilton gives you the chuck our double tree, they give you the chocolate chip cookie. Right. Little things like that. Most of us are not going to be able to come up with something as extraordinary as that. So, yes, while I know that there are some outlier companies, we could all point emboli, well, they don’t have to do that much. They’re an outlier. We are not. All right. We are the 80 percent bell curve. All right. So I get get comfortable with getting comfortable with social media.

Fern:
So on that note, you when did you start Microgram University or one that launch live?

Stu Brauer:
That was that was we’ve been working on it since two thousand and eighteen and then it launched. April, May, I would say it probably launched in like May is Juneish of this year.

Fern:
Is that largely so? Targeting targeted towards or designed around teaching people social media, marketing? Or what’s that? What is until.

Stu Brauer:
Yes, it is. I have eight. There’s. Yeah. It’s pretty much my goal was to not create systems. I didn’t. I love to two brain guys. I love the Mad Labs guys in our gym. Right. I didn’t want to sell systems. I’ve seen it all. I want to. Just take what everyone else is doing. Put it into an educational platform like you pick which one you like the most. And if you need suggestions, let me know and I’ll tell you which one I think would fit best with your model. Instead of saying you’ve got to do it this way and all the Lego blocks that fit. Here’s how you do the four nines compensation now. Here’s how you do performance. Here’s how you do salary. Here’s you know, I come from the global gym scene, so I’ve got the benefit of seeing a lot of different things that we don’t typically see traditionally in Crossfit, gyms. But that’s why some of them work really well. Yeah. It was just an online school for anybody who was looking to start a gym and didn’t want to make all the mistakes and shit that we see already or anyone who’s in it. And they need to select a specific course like the social media marketing course because they just don’t have a fucking clue.

Fern:
Yeah, that’s where to start. And if you don’t wanna spend money there, guys. I get it. Like here, here’s a guess. What type in your computer. YouTube. Facebook market. And it’s like it’s on you guys. It’s free,.

Stu Brauer:
Free.

Fern:
It’s free. You can get like you can get 50 percent of the way there with free content on YouTube. And just if you’re definitely. Yeah, whatever. Look at the date. You probably want to choose something that’s within the last six to 12 months. If it’s 3 years old, it’s probably completely relevant. None of us can. The screens will match up to what you have on your Facebook ads. Manager. It’ll all be backwards. But just look at the date. Look at it. Look at the. Look at the users. Look at the comments. All that stuff is not going to take you long to find a pretty useful piece of content on YouTube about Facebook ads.

Stu Brauer:
I’ve got a 2 year old now I have. I can’t picture sending her to college. She’s gonna go to YouTube fucking U like. That’s literally everything you need to learn is on YouTube. Like people ask me, why would anyone spend money on your course? Like it? The only reason anyone listening you’ll reason anyone would do micro university is because they want to hear my delivery. That’s it. It’s the only reason. Otherwise it’s all on the internet for free. You just have to hunted down. Yeah, that’s it.

Fern:
So the other thing you have coming up is the self-made summit, which is in. So the surprise drop.

Stu Brauer:
October yet 18, 19 to 20th were just the re-branding thing is a big topic in the microgram scene and we’ve gone through that over the past three years. So I got together a bunch of gyms that started as Crossfit, affiliates. Some are still Crossfit, affiliates and they just have changed names. Some have left the Crossfit, affiliation status and have gone on the franchise and open multiple. So I just brought all those guys together just because their origin story was a Crossfit, affiliate. And I do feel because I Krabi, as we all know, Crossfit, is given wave to the biggest boom in the boutique fitness scene that we’ve ever seen. And I still feel like there’s how you have to pay homage to that. And I wanted to get guys who just had different stories and how they did that. I do believe a lot of people with which is a whole different podcast, I’m not really sure what the fuck they’re doing with their brand and maybe they like or don’t like what Crossfit, is doing. And they’ve created different core values in a different core focus internally. And they want to change stuff, but they don’t know how they’re scared to upset their current members. They don’t want people to leave. So I put together the self-made summit to talk about how to do that efficiently.

Fern:
Yeah, I think I think there’s some good value there. Like I’m clearly biased. I mean, I worked for the company on a Crossfit, gym.

Stu Brauer:
Of course. Of course.

Fern:
I get a little. And I like if you re-brand like, that’s fine. I just think there’s a lot of people that are re-branding for the wrong reasons. Right.

Stu Brauer:
1000 percent.

Fern:
I do think there are people there, but you need to rebrand like you’re cool. You don’t even like Crossfit, anymore. So just don’t be a Crossfit, gym. Like that’s fine if you’re not doing it that don’t use the name. But I do think people are rebranding under the guise of like well that’s going to fix my business anyway. No, it’s not. You still run a business. It’s just old. It’s just called something fitness now instead of Crossfit, something.

Stu Brauer:
100 percent. You’ve been in my spot. I’ve got that coffee lounge in there. Like right now I’m on my I’m on my house right now. But I got I’ve got cameras in there.

Stu Brauer:
I’ve got 17 people in the coffee lounge. I can’t have diane going on right with six people in the coffee lounge having meetings and working on their thesis. We had to because the business changed. And you’re right. And I don’t think anyone will see this. That’s a whole nother podcast. We could do another time. But guys, really look at what is it you’re trying to do? Just like people like going at a bootcamp. Well, why? It’s because you want more money. It’s because you haven’t put enough effort into your Crossfit, program. Right. You don’t need to add a boot camp to fucking make lake. Is your current thing broken? Changing the name of it doesn’t fix it.

Fern:
Yes. Correct. Right. So I’m just like they again. Consumers are not dumb. They know it’s you. Just because you changed the name, this is like if I just change my name to Bob next week, ever does you. No, no, you’re you’re Jason Fernandez. But you were doing that really poorly and you figured that changing your name was going to just magically fix that. That’s not the case.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah, it’s a hundred percent, and it’s but again, I think that that’s a big conversation where we’re see a lot more gyms have and more content that that’s gonna be coming out of gyms who have done it really well, gyms who have eight shit.

Stu Brauer:
And he died because of it because they did it wrong. And it’s that’s a very loaded topic.

Fern:
So, yeah. Well listen, dude, we’ll wrap this up, but I appreciate it and I want any. So listen, you’re kind of a controversial guy, which I’m totally cool with. You know, I think you can rub rub people the wrong way. But I really would urge people I’m like, listen, if you don’t like the fact that Stu cusses, just get over it. I don’t know for about 40 minutes and listen to the content of the conversation, because it’s good content, right? It’s not I don’t. I truly don’t believe I wouldn’t have him on the podcast. We wouldn’t I’m on the podcast fucking twice if we thought that he was giving shitty advice. So. Yeah, and I do.

Stu Brauer:
And I really I appreciate you and Jason Tonn for having me on here. And I think what you guys are doing is great and obviously getting a chance to meet you guys. When we were hosting the certs and all that is has been really cool. And I hope people that listen to this really understand. You it again. There’s not a lot of people do it like. I don’t know how many people in seminar staff and all that are doing podcasts and putting out the kind of content that you guys are doing. Right.

Fern:
It’s yeah, it’s the older ones get where the they all this we have done niche as far as like coaching goes.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah. And you guys are busy as fuck. I know the lifestyle you guys run with those seminars from hearing about it third party and it just these guys are busy. And the fact that they take the time to create this stuff, it’s not just fucking it takes a lot of work, just like we talked about the social media takes a lot of work.

Stu Brauer:
This does, too. But I’ve heard nothing but good things of other people that love your guys as shit. I got so much good feedback when I was on with Jace. And anyway, I really do appreciate you guys having me on here today and exposing me to your audience.

Fern:
Yeah, dude. So guys, check out to check out what the fuck gym talk. Go check out micro- Gym University. If you haven’t pitched the self-made summit real quick because I know there are some options if people can’t attend.

Stu Brauer:
Yeah, if you can’t make it, guys, what for what a reason, travel price point or whatever, we have a remote access. So you’ll get all five of the keynotes from alchemy three five metabolic ego fed and Steve Pinkerton, a vitality fitness myself. Joe Tibaldi will fly anyway. So all the content that’s we’ve done there, the Q&A is about the rebranding. If you’re in that boat and you’re thinking of rebranding, no one else is putting this stuff on. It is kind of a controversial topic, especially amongst the Crossfit, scene, which I get. I completely understand, but that’s why I decided to do it and I’m doing it. Tried to do in the most respectful, honest way possible, showing people the pros and cons of this entire thing. And if that’s something you’d like to get a hold of. Go to the Web site. We’ve got remote access there and we’ll see. Yeah, that’s that’s a way you can kind of sink your teeth in.

Fern:
Cool. Guys, if you have more specific questions, obviously you know where to find Stu on one Instagram. Hit us up. We can we can pass you off if we need to. But if you have more questions about this, maybe we do a Q&A one time, do it. Maybe we do like live or some like that.

Stu Brauer:
Would be fun.

Fern:
And then something like that. So our brother, I know you’re busy. I’ll let you go. I gotta head back. I’ve got another podcast after this. Appreciate your time.

Stu Brauer:
Did your thing, Thank you.

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